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My awesome new idea for a scenario is nearly done!


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I am making a scenario where you run for president of the European Union in 2006. These are the parties/canidates:

Labour- Prime Minister Tony Blair (UK), Prime Minister Goran Presson (Sweden)

Green- Rep. Osmo Soininvaara (Finland), Rep. Trevor Sargent (Ireland)

Conservative- The Honorable Kenneth Clarke (UK), The Honorable William Hague (UK), Prime Minister Alain Juppe (France), PresidentJacques Chirac (France)

Socialist- (These are two people who are made up) General Kadas Petrova (Poland),Senator Sidor Ivanov (Russia)

Story:

General Kadas Petrova lead a successful revolt against Russia's dictator, Vladimere Putin. Instead of creating one nation, it is slit in half: the EU State and the Asian Country.The EU election takes place. Petrova is the favorite in East Europe. while Tony Blair has the north, Chirac has the west, and Soininvaara has the south. Who will win?

Issues:

Anti-Semitism

Direct Democracy

Foreign Policy

Freedom of Religion

Military Intervention

Military Funding

NATO

Russian State

Same-Sex Marriage

Same-Sex Adoption

Socialism

The Russian State

Terrorism

Trade

Turkey

US Relations

The UN

Vatican City

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I know this is supposed to be an eelction of a fully-functioning souvereign state, but if it was a real EU election for a real EU president, one very important issue would be 'EU integration', ie. how much decision power do the individual member states want to cede to a centralised EU governing body? This would leave the Nordic countries and UK in particular as extreme on one wing (opponents), and Luxembourg, Italy and Germany as extremes on the other (proponents).

Another major issue in the current EU is farming subsidies, another one which divides it (France being the foremost against reform, Netherlands, UK, Germany and the Nordic members being the most eager for reform).

Rather than 'Military funding' being an issue, it's instead 'Military structure'. Do we want a unified European army (read: reaction force) or do we want to keep the system as is?

Socialism is dead and out of the water, but if you want a more ideological issue, something like 'Privatisation' or 'Welfare state' could do.

Why is 'Vatican City' an issue, by the way? Oh, and you have '(The) Russian State' twice as an issue in your list.

Again, as said before, a few of these problems with the issues could be explained by how you perceive the election: As a realistic one, where the issues mirror those discussed in the EU 2004; or a hypothetical one, where there are new states etc.

I can't believe that the most popular politician and secretary of state (foreign affairs) of the EU's largest member state, Germany - Joschka Fischer - isn't included on the Green party's ballot.

Furthermore, in accordance with what others have said, I think it's too fabricated to have a socialist party. Instead have a populist/nationalist party. There are many nationalist/populist parties in Europe (UK Independence Party, British Nationalist Party, Front Nationale, Vlaams Blok, Freiheitliche Partei Östereichs, Dansk Folkeparti, to name but a few), and in many of the new 10 member states such parties have sprung up in opposition to 'one central power (Soviet, Moscow) being substituted for another (EU, Brussels).'

Gerhard Schröder and Blair would form a more uniform Labour platform, by the way. There's quite a difference between Persson and Blair, and Persson holds little sway in EU meetings.

If you want to research voting trends in the respective districts (member states), I can recommend looking at the last European Parliament election, which was held June this year.

I hope this doesn't sound like a hammering; I hope you take it on board as constructive criticism - that's certainly what it is intended as :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well I also think that the socialist party thing is senseless. But besides my support for the idea with the populist party you forgot the third largest political movement in the European Parlament: The Liberals. And they have prominent figures, too, like Guy Verhofstat, the Belgian prime minister or his Estonian counterpart Juhan Parts. Some other countries are also governed by liberals.

And please don't mix Poles with Bulgarians or other southeastern Slavs

Kadas Petrova is not a Polish name. It's not even close to one. So, shame on you on behalf of the Polish people. And they are very anti-communist by the way. Welcome in the 21st century.

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[...] the Polish people. And they are very anti-communist by the way. Welcome in the 21st century.

The post-Communist era Communist parties in Eastern Europe aren't doing that badly (a case in point is PDS, the remake of the SED of the DDR), and saying 'very anti-communist' does negate the fact that hyperinflation and mass unemployment has turned some people towards Communist parties.

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I was referring to Poland as anti-comunist and not the eastern part of Germany, and if you would mind to take a look at the results of the EU-Parlament in Poland you will notice that the socialists and post-comunists have massive losses. The conservatives, theocrats, populists and liberals are winning instead, so that was all i meant. No communist general with a Bulgarian name starting as a polish candidate will be realistic. That was my remark.

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I was referring to Poland as anti-comunist and not the eastern part of Germany, and if you would mind to take a look at the results of the EU-Parlament in Poland you will notice that the socialists and post-comunists have massive losses. The conservatives, theocrats, populists and liberals are winning instead, so that was all i meant. No communist general with a Bulgarian name starting as a polish candidate will be realistic. That was my remark.

The scenario creator wanted a socialist candidate that had his base support from all of the former Communist countries, so in that sense it became a question of not just Poland, but Eastern Europe in general. I didn't know about the candidate being Bulgarian, but I see that he is being omitted.

I don't think European Parliamentary elections are the best guideline to the political mood in a country, especially considering the catastrophically low turnout, especially in places like Poland, but they will have to do. If you look at the 'old' EU members, the results of EP-elections and national polls at the same time they divert greatly.

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