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I think Biden is an existential threat to the country and in my 34+ years I have never been more embarrassed to be an American than I am with him as president. Even though the vast majority of my adult I have been a registered Democrat (presently independent).

That said however, I think spending is a good thing. Had Trump won the deficit would look similar and so would inflation. He’d probably just spend money on stimulus/infrastructure that people want.

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12 hours ago, PoliticalPundit said:

inflation numbers today were awful, Biden looking more like Jimmy Carter by the day. 

 

They say it will over in months.. I have STRONG doubts about that. It's going to be March and still this will be an issue.. We'll see. 

I think if the GOP does do well in the midterms it will be because of inflation. 

Carter wasn't the cause of inflation, however. He just was unable to reign in existing inflation. The inflation issue started with Nixon, carried on with Ford, and existed in the beginning of Reagan's term. You can't just pin it on Carter, although he does deserve some blame for not finding a solution to bring it down during his term. 

I also agree with @populist86 in his suggestion that Trump would be having the same inflation woes if he had won. That's true. The inflation is systematic of things that occurred prior to Biden taking office. If Biden loses in 2024 because of inflation, historians will connect Trump-Biden-(whoever the 2024 winner is) much in the same way as historians connect Nixon-Ford-Carter to the 1970s inflation. That said, the current inflation is nowhere as near as bad as the 1970s inflation. It would be like comparing the COVID Recession to the Great Depression or something. It certainly isn't good, but it also isn't spiraling out of control. 

My own thoughts on Biden, to respond to @populist86's thoughts, are much different. He seems obviously far embarrassing than Trump, partially because Biden isn't drawing attention to himself and neither is he slinging insults daily or boasting daily. He's at least presidential. Policy-wise and executive-wise, he's operating just about the way I expected or expect any establishment president to operate. As someone that prefers Sanders or Warren, he's obviously disappointing and will disappoint me, but I can at least breathe a sigh of relief that he isn't going to dismantle things that a GOP president will or has dismantled, repealed, revoked, deactivated, etc. I think Biden is a C+ president, which is what I expected him to be. Trump was a D- or F president, and the leading historians agree. Biden is flawed. He might become a below average president, even (although I think he'll be average), but he won't be a poor or failed president like Trump was.

Everything is so much calmer with Biden in office. It's so nice. It's like being on vacation. Gentle breeze. Quiet. Everything seems so much more refreshing. Enjoy it.   

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4 hours ago, vcczar said:

Everything is so much calmer with Biden in office. It's so nice. It's like being on vacation. Gentle breeze. Quiet. Everything seems so much more refreshing. Enjoy it.

😆 It's true that this is a welcome change - even I, someone closer to Trump's policies than Biden's in many cases, was and am tired of the constant shit show. Even his post-election missives tend toward the ridiculous - attacking Fauci, Birx, and now his own AG. They were *his* appointees, joining many others he has attacked (such as Bolton). One or two incidences like this, fine - but a string of them suggests the problem isn't just them but also Trump.

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The 3 big problems with Trump's Presidency from my POV are

1. Confused response to Covid.

2. Inflammatory rhetoric which caused problems more than it solved them. Some of this is great - he's fighting for what he believes in. Too much and it just becomes tone-deaf and histrionic.

3. String of questionable personnel choices. 

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My guess is that Trump 'actually' won both AZ and GA. Even if the evidence continues to pile up, and it becomes clear Biden won the EC by 1 state (or even lost!), at this point I would still favour a vigorous, open primaries (and at this point favour DeSantis over Trump) for the GOP in 2024, not a coronation for Trump.

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It's also becoming clearer that Trump supporters were to some extent setup on 1/6, with federal agents and agent provocateurs in the mix probably being decisive in parts of the crowd moving into the Capitol. *Even so*, Trump should have easily seen that his opponents would try to do this, and encouraged the crowd to meet the previous day, or at least stay away from the Capitol while the voting was on-going. Just more shit show - a self-own. 

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10 hours ago, Anthony_270 said:

My guess is that Trump 'actually' won both AZ and GA. Even if the evidence continues to pile up, and it becomes clear Biden won the EC by 1 state (or even lost!), at this point I would still favour a vigorous, open primaries (and at this point favour DeSantis over Trump) for the GOP in 2024, not a coronation for Trump.

I don’t think Trump won AZ. I do however think PA might have been turned by fraudulent changes in election laws. Allowing vote by mail but not in person early voting stacked the margins significantly. Biden got something like 86% of the early vote in PA, not in Philly but state-wide. In other midwestern states the margin was 60-40 or lower.

GA it seems likely was turned by fraud surrounding automatic voter registration - a measure I actually support. I just think the cost of incorrect results is outweighed by the benefit of enfranchising more voters.

Regarding things being calmer, when the house wins things tend to go that way. The media, Big Pharma, and China got their guy in, they don’t need to fight anymore. I’m embarrassed to have once been a Democrat. 

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On 7/14/2021 at 10:31 AM, Anthony_270 said:

The 3 big problems with Trump's Presidency from my POV are

1. Confused response to Covid.

2. Inflammatory rhetoric which caused problems more than it solved them. Some of this is great - he's fighting for what he believes in. Too much and it just becomes tone-deaf and histrionic.

3. String of questionable personnel choices. 

? what do you mean by this

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7 minutes ago, Anthony_270 said:

Bolton, Fauci, Birx, Barr, most latest is Milley - there are other high profiles ones I can't remember off hand. These were bad appointments *according to Trump*.

oh, I misread it. I thought you said "personal" choices not "personnel" choices haha 

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On 7/15/2021 at 6:22 PM, Anthony_270 said:

Bolton, Fauci, Birx, Barr, most latest is Milley - there are other high profiles ones I can't remember off hand. These were bad appointments *according to Trump*.

Anyone that later disagrees with him or has any semblance of an independent mind is a "bad appointment," according to Trump. He doesn't want any contradictions, even if he's got an opinion on something he knows very little about. 

I thought it was interesting though that Bolton was the one "bad appointment" that defended Trump from accusations that Trump might launch a coup. Bolton thought launching a coup required a depth of thinking and a level of foresight that Trump doesn't possess. 

Going back to the top of "Inflation," although I'm uncertain if this plays a role in what I'm about to say: The main street in my neighborhood has "Help Wanted" signs on about 7 out of 10 businesses, mostly restaurants. This is no doubt residual results of the COVID Recession. I'm a little surprised that none of these "Help Wanted" signs give details to the terms of hiring. If I were desperate for employees, I'd mention the hourly wage and any benefits. If enough businesses do this, they can compete with salaries and benefits with one another. It's an unusual situation because often a wage worker hasn't much of a choice of work. They're lucky to get it. Now there's the opportunity for choice. 

I've also noticed that the streets have far fewer uber drivers, which is driving up the costs during non-peak hours. 

Obviously, this is bad if long-term but it also provides an opportunity for higher wages and more benefits. It's going to be a stare-down contest. I'm a little curious which way this situation goes -- could be great, ultimately, or it could be a disaster. It's going to make midterms a dice roll. 

I wouldn't be surprised if, once Covid checks dry up, that these holes fill up quickly. I'm wondering if Democrats are planning to trigger a massive job surge prior to midterms to help their chances then. 

Nevertheless, the Covid checks are quite paltry compared to even wages at a restaurant. 

One of the restaurants isn't helping their case. "No outside seating due to limited staff" which is right next to "Help Wanted." This sort shows a sign of impending failure. Who would want to take a job for company that seems about to fail? A better option is to not have a sign about the outdoor seating and to inform customers that service will be slower if you choose to sit outside because of temporary limited staff.

 

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

Anyone that later disagrees with him or has any semblance of an independent mind is a "bad appointment," according to Trump.

I think this is a reasonable conclusion to come to. Basically, anyone who publicly attacks him, he attacks back. Even if it means making an argument that ultimately undermines the assessment of his own hiring choices.

This goes back to Trump's commitment to 'eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth'. He believes in this, presumably because he thinks it dissuades people from attacking him.

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1 minute ago, Anthony_270 said:

This goes back to Trump's commitment to 'eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth'. He believes in this, presumably because he thinks it dissuades people from attacking him.

I think it might have the ultimate result. They'll just attack him more. A New Testament mentality isn't that great for the 21st century. It's better to give logical reasons for why that appointee is wrong in whatever instance they are wrong in. 

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15 minutes ago, vcczar said:

I think it might have the ultimate result. They'll just attack him more. A New Testament mentality isn't that great for the 21st century. It's better to give logical reasons for why that appointee is wrong in whatever instance they are wrong in. 

I don't understand these sentences.

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46 minutes ago, Anthony_270 said:

I don't understand these sentences.

Probably because I'm multitasking. I'll try to improve them: 

"Ultimate" is autocorrect error. It should read, "I think it might have the opposite result." Second sentence is understandable. Third sentence is in relation to "eye for an eye," which is a very Old Testament or at least BC "Before Christ" mentality (in my opinion). The last sentence is arguing that rather than insulting his appointees or indirectly stating he made a bad decision in picking them for an office, that he would have been wiser to give logical reasons for why his appointee is wrong in whatever wayward opinion/belief that the appointee is having. For instance, if Bolton says Trump's North Korea strategy is flawed. Trump, rather than calling Bolton and "idiot" or a bad appointment, should say something like, "I appreciate Bolton playing devil's advocate--that's one reason I wanted him on the team--but myself and my foreign policy team has found that our policy towards North Korea will make the USA and the world stronger." A statement like this shows Bolton is a minority opinion, that he didn't make a "bad appointment, and gives some confidence of level-headedness that an insult doesn't do. 

I hope that's clearer.

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2 hours ago, vcczar said:

"Ultimate" is autocorrect error.

Ah, that was it. :)

Ya, the reflex insulting and blaming others gets pretty tiring. I agree that sort of response would be better, but Trump seems to thrive on the constant media buzz. It's the WWE school of media relations, IMO.

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1 hour ago, Anthony_270 said:

Having said that, I would prefer lots of drama with Trump to little drama with, say, Biden.

But everyone can use a bit of constructive feedback. ;)

I totally agree, my grocery bill is so bad for myself and my boyfirend its almost 150 bucks a week, for simple stuff its so bad.

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1 hour ago, Anthony_270 said:

Having said that, I would prefer lots of drama with Trump to little drama with, say, Biden.

But everyone can use a bit of constructive feedback. ;)

I'm curious if you'd feel that way if you lived here. For instance, I might want more interesting foreign leaders because it's more fun to read about and I don't suffer the repercussions. For instance, I wasn't terribly opposed to Boris Johnson as other people that share my US views. I must admit part of that is because I don't live there but also that I found Johnson more interesting than Corbyn, even though I would have wanted Corbyn to win if I lived there most likely. I also was rooting for Corbyn but only because I assume I'd prefer him if I lived there, but I have strong feeling in that election or any elections outside the US, except in the case that one of the nominees is an authoritarian (and the other isn't) or the nominee is favoring apartheid, state-endorsed bigotry/racism, or genocide (and the other isn't).  

I agree with the Constructive Feedback. For instance, I'm reading a Civil Rights book that has a much more conservative view on Civil Rights but openly supports pro-active measure to defend and expand it. Basically, it's critical of Identity Politics but not of fighting for Civil Rights. The author is black. I've just begun the book. Lots of strong points. Already finding some spots of weakness, but it's definitely useful and, so far, seems to be a strong work in finding some sort of compromise theory between those that like Identity Politics and those that think its counter-productive or inflaming.

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6 hours ago, vcczar said:

Anyone that later disagrees with him or has any semblance of an independent mind is a "bad appointment," according to Trump. He doesn't want any contradictions, even if he's got an opinion on something he knows very little about. 

I thought it was interesting though that Bolton was the one "bad appointment" that defended Trump from accusations that Trump might launch a coup. Bolton thought launching a coup required a depth of thinking and a level of foresight that Trump doesn't possess. 

Going back to the top of "Inflation," although I'm uncertain if this plays a role in what I'm about to say: The main street in my neighborhood has "Help Wanted" signs on about 7 out of 10 businesses, mostly restaurants. This is no doubt residual results of the COVID Recession. I'm a little surprised that none of these "Help Wanted" signs give details to the terms of hiring. If I were desperate for employees, I'd mention the hourly wage and any benefits. If enough businesses do this, they can compete with salaries and benefits with one another. It's an unusual situation because often a wage worker hasn't much of a choice of work. They're lucky to get it. Now there's the opportunity for choice. 

I've also noticed that the streets have far fewer uber drivers, which is driving up the costs during non-peak hours. 

Obviously, this is bad if long-term but it also provides an opportunity for higher wages and more benefits. It's going to be a stare-down contest. I'm a little curious which way this situation goes -- could be great, ultimately, or it could be a disaster. It's going to make midterms a dice roll. 

I wouldn't be surprised if, once Covid checks dry up, that these holes fill up quickly. I'm wondering if Democrats are planning to trigger a massive job surge prior to midterms to help their chances then. 

Nevertheless, the Covid checks are quite paltry compared to even wages at a restaurant. 

One of the restaurants isn't helping their case. "No outside seating due to limited staff" which is right next to "Help Wanted." This sort shows a sign of impending failure. Who would want to take a job for company that seems about to fail? A better option is to not have a sign about the outdoor seating and to inform customers that service will be slower if you choose to sit outside because of temporary limited staff.

 

The bottom line is the unemployment benefits for sitting at home and doing nothing was an awful mistake when these same people would normally drive Uber's or work in hospitality. Uber's are absolutely ridiculous today and I have strong doubts they get even close to "normal" till 2022. 

These benefits should have ended last month - the fact that Democratic states have them going till September is insane. 

 

The fact that as all this happens, the Dems are trying to jam a massive "infrastructure" bill through instead of the bipartisan bill is crazy to me. We are spending just way too much in general, and I question in 4 years where our economy will be. Particularly since I'm hearing rumors that Powell is getting replaced for a more "big tech heavy" leader.. 

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25 minutes ago, PoliticalPundit said:

The bottom line is the unemployment benefits for sitting at home and doing nothing was an awful mistake when these same people would normally drive Uber's or work in hospitality. Uber's are absolutely ridiculous today and I have strong doubts they get even close to "normal" till 2022. 

These benefits should have ended last month - the fact that Democratic states have them going till September is insane. 

 

The fact that as all this happens, the Dems are trying to jam a massive "infrastructure" bill through instead of the bipartisan bill is crazy to me. We are spending just way too much in general, and I question in 4 years where our economy will be. Particularly since I'm hearing rumors that Powell is getting replaced for a more "big tech heavy" leader.. 

Not to mention about the bendfits but people are suing the states that stop the extra money a week and winning in court.

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