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Korean Unification Constituent Assembly 2047


Patine
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vcczar @Reagan04 @Actinguy @Patine  @TheMiddlePolitical @WVProgressive @SilentLiberty @pilight  @Hestia11 @Herbert Hoover @mlcorcoran @Leuser @upandaway @jvikings1 @Rodja @Edouard @jnewt @Nentomat @Kingthero @Sunnymentoaddict @RFK/JFKfan @Mr.Blood @Zenobiyl @Wiw @MBDemSoc @ThePotatoWalrus @Alxeu @Allyn @Cenzonico @CentristGuy @Ishan @billay @wolves @RI Democrat @lizarraba @lizphairphreak @TheLiberalKitten @MysteryKnight @avatarmushi  @Mark_W@Anthony_270 @populist86 @BeetleJuice   @Ido @Berg2036 @PunPunand ESPECIALLY @IndependentPerson and @Conservative Elector 2

This scenario is part of my fictional hypothetical future 2048 (or so) scenario set. It involves, after numerous political, military, and economic issues on both sides of the Demilitarized Zone, but neither side desiring to push to a new, true and genuine negotiations for a full reunification of the Korean Peninsula have begun. This is a Constituent Assembly election, not a proper Presidential or Parliamentary one, and thus most issues and events centre on hammering a new Constitution for a United Korea. Ideally, such a Constitution is meant to go into force in 2048, on the centennial anniversary of the creation of the separate North and South Korean nations. There is a Seven-Power Guidance and Assistance Committee to aid and observe, but with little true long-term binding authority, made up of the People's Republic of China, the Restored Russian Socialist Federation, Japan, the Republic of India, the Federation of Australasia, the Western North American Federation, and the Republic of California (the main powers in the Pacific Rim in this timeline by 2047). Among the main the parties participating are:

-The Workers' Party of the Greater Korean Fatherland (built from the governing Workers' Party of Korea in modern North Korea)

-The Democratic and Unification Party of Korea (built from the governing Democratic Party of Korea in modern South Korea)

-Parties built around the modern Progressive Party, People's Power Party, and Korean Green Party of modern South Korea and Chandoist Party of modern North Korea, maybe with name changes or alterations

-A fusion of the left-leaning Justice and Labour Parties of modern South Korea and the Korean Social Democratic Party of modern North Korea

-A Joseon Monarchist Revival Party

-And maybe a few more

I'm fully open to constructive suggestions, as well as on issues, events, and other such things.

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7 minutes ago, Patine said:

vcczar @Reagan04 @Actinguy @Patine  @TheMiddlePolitical @WVProgressive @SilentLiberty @pilight  @Hestia11 @Herbert Hoover @mlcorcoran @Leuser @upandaway @jvikings1 @Rodja @Edouard @jnewt @Nentomat @Kingthero @Sunnymentoaddict @RFK/JFKfan @Mr.Blood @Zenobiyl @Wiw @MBDemSoc @ThePotatoWalrus @Alxeu @Allyn @Cenzonico @CentristGuy @Ishan @billay @wolves @RI Democrat @lizarraba @lizphairphreak @TheLiberalKitten @MysteryKnight @avatarmushi  @Mark_W@Anthony_270 @populist86 @BeetleJuice   @Ido @Berg2036 @PunPunand ESPECIALLY @IndependentPerson and @Conservative Elector 2

This scenario is part of my fictional hypothetical future 2048 (or so) scenario set. It involves, after numerous political, military, and economic issues on both sides of the Demilitarized Zone, but neither side desiring to push to a new, true and genuine negotiations for a full reunification of the Korean Peninsula have begun. This is a Constituent Assembly election, not a proper Presidential or Parliamentary one, and thus most issues and events centre on hammering a new Constitution for a United Korea. Ideally, such a Constitution is meant to go into force in 2048, on the centennial anniversary of the creation of the separate North and South Korean nations. There is a Seven-Power Guidance and Assistance Committee to aid and observe, but with little true long-term binding authority, made up of the People's Republic of China, the Restored Russian Socialist Federated Republic, Japan, the Republic of India, the Federation of Australasia, the Western North American Federation, and the Republic of California (the main powers in the Pacific Rim in this timeline by 2047). Among the main the parties participating are:

-The Workers' Party of the Greater Korean Fatherland (built from the governing Workers' Party of Korea in modern North Korea)

-The Democratic and Unification Party of Korea (built from the governing Democratic Party of Korea in modern South Korea)

-Parties built around the modern Progressive Party, People's Power Party, and Korean Green Party of modern South Korea and Chandoist Party of modern North Korea, maybe with name changes or alterations

-A fusion of the left-leaning Justice and Labour Parties of modern South Korea and the Korean Social Democratic Party of modern North Korea

-A Joseon Monarchist Revival Party

-And maybe a few more

I'm fully open to constructive suggestions, as well as on issues, events, and other such things.

1.What electoral system will be used? The current South Korean system?

2.There are descendants of the royal family, but I don't think they are making any effort to revive the monarchy.

3.I honestly think the Green Party will actually fit with the Justice Party better.

4.What about the Conservatives?

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Just now, IndependentPerson said:

1.What eleectoral system will be used?

2.There are descendants of the royal family, but I don't think they are making any effort to revive the monarchy.

3.I honestly think the Green Party will actually fit with the Justice Party better.

4.What about the Conservatives?

1. I am considering that part, and haven't come up with an answer yet.

2. I am viewing it much like French, German, and a few other countries' royalist parties that crop up perennially - they run on restoring the monarchy, and THEN talking an heir into taking the position is meant to be done afterwards.

3. You're probably right, here.

4. I'm a bit confused as to who the TRUE Conservatives are in South Korea. The Democratic Party are Classical Liberals, and the People's Power Party are Ultra-Nationalists, both on the right side of the spectrum. Who are considered the standard, "Conservatives?"

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Just now, Patine said:

1. I am considering that part, and haven't come up with an answer yet.

2. I am viewing it much like French, German, and a few other countries' royalist parties that crop up perennially - they run on restoring the monarchy, and THEN talking an heir into taking the position is meant to be done afterwards.

3. You're probably right, here.

4. I'm a bit confused as to who the TRUE Conservatives are in South Korea. The Democratic Party are Classical Liberals, and the People's Power Party are Ultra-Nationalists, both on the right side of the spectrum. Who are considered the standard, "Conservatives?"

The People's Power Party are conservatives in South Korea. What do you mean by "Ultra-nationalist"?

Immigration and race are hardly even issues in South Korea. In my opinion, the Progressives tend to be more nationalist (left-wing nationalism, anti-imperialism, etc.).

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Just now, IndependentPerson said:

The People's Power Party are conservatives in South Korea. What do you mean by "Ultra-nationalist"?

Immigration and race are hardly even issues in South Korea. In my opinion, the Progressives tend to be more nationalist (left-wing nationalism, anti-imperialism, etc.).

That's the label Wikipedia gave them (perhaps contributor bias). I did include include them in the original list of parties above, as well as the Progressives, in the original list of parties in my first post, if you look. It's just that they, as well as the Green and Chandoist Parties shared a line of text, which might have thrown you off while reading.

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6 minutes ago, Patine said:

That's the label Wikipedia gave them (perhaps contributor bias). I did include include them in the original list of parties above, as well as the Progressives, in the original list of parties in my first post, if you look. It's just that they, as well as the Green and Chandoist Parties shared a line of text, which might have thrown you off while reading.

The People's Power Party would never unite with the Progressive Party.

The Progressive Party tends to have a sympathetic attitude to North Korea.

The People's Power Party are die-hard anti-Communists.

In fact, I'd say that uniting the Progressive and Chondoist parties make sense, but I'd say they'd sooner unite with the Workers Party than the People's Power Party.

To put it simply, Ronald Reagan would never unite with Bernie Sanders.

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Just now, IndependentPerson said:

The People's Power Party would never unite with the Progressive Party.

The Progressive Party tends to have a sympathetic attitude to North Korea.

The People's Power Party are die-hard anti-Communists.

In fact, I'd say that uniting the Progressive and Chondoist parties make sense, but I'd say they'd sooner unite with the Workers Party than the People's Power Party.

Ronald Reagan would never unite with the Workers World Party.

My apologies for the confusion. My way of typing is sloppy here. The Justice, Labour, and Korean Social Democratic Parties (and, now that you mention is, probably the Korean Green Party) are stated as a merger. The People's Power Party, the Progressive Party, and the Chandoist, while listed in a similar one line format, were meant to be listed as appearing as separate parties as I had intended. My format of putting them on a single is sloppy there, and thus was confusing, and I apologize for that.

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39 minutes ago, IndependentPerson said:

1.What electoral system will be used? The current South Korean system?

2.There are descendants of the royal family, but I don't think they are making any effort to revive the monarchy.

3.I honestly think the Green Party will actually fit with the Justice Party better.

4.What about the Conservatives?

Also, given a Constituent Assembly is a great time for such renegotiation, perhaps a Jeju Autonomist/Nationalist Party. Of course, given the very limited number of possible seats possible to them, the best they could hope for is as a, "kingmaker," party if the margin of majority is razor thin to force concessions.

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Just now, Patine said:

Also, given a Constituent Assembly is a great time for such renegotiation, perhaps a Jeju Autonomist/Nationalist Party. Of course, given the very limited number of possible seats possible to them, the best they could hope for is as a, "kingmaker," party if the margin of majority is razor thin to force concessions.

Maybe if it was a local assembly, they might do better. But where would they be on the left-right spectrum? Cheju seems to be a swing region in Presidential elections, Liberal in legislative elections, and Conservative when they elect govenors. The Progressive (and maybe the Green Party) seems to do well in that region.

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Just now, IndependentPerson said:

Maybe if it was a local assembly, they might do better. But where would they be on the left-right spectrum? Cheju seems to be a swing region in Presidential elections, Liberal in legislative elections, and Conservative when they elect govenors. The Progressive (and maybe the Green Party) seems to do well in that region.

Perhaps like the BQ here in Canada, in overall effect (whatever their whole platform on the campaign trail may be). They've backed Liberal AND Conservative minority governments, and brought down both in votes of no confidence, looking for the best deal for Quebec. Other then the Workers' and the People' Power Parties (who might both be, "turkeys voting for Christmas," to support, as yet another Nationalist party botching at that tactic was termed as doing), they might be pretty flexible as to whom they'd back, depending on the concessions of autonomy they'd get - especially if the island is normally a pendulum.

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