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1637 Massachusetts Election 2.0!! (Events added)


1637 Massachusetts Election  

13 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you plan on downloading this election?

  2. 2. Why are you interested in playing this election?

    • I am interested in Massachusetts history
    • I am interested in colonial history
    • I long for the days when the separation of Church and State was barely existent.
    • I want to learn more about this time period through the game
    • I want to rewrite history by winning the election with a liberal (Henry Vane) or a more radically religious Puritan (Endicott).
    • I don't know why I am interested in the scenario, but I am.
    • I am not interested in this election
  3. 3. If you lived in 1636-1637, you would have probably voted for

    • Dep. Gov. John Winthrop -- moderate conservative, and the most powerful man in the colony since 1630.
    • Gov. Sir Henry Vane -- liberal incumbent governor who is much more of a Londoner than a Utopian puritan, and elected governor purely by his pedigree
    • Assist. Thomas Dudley - moderate conservative, and political rival of Winthrop, consistently the second fiddle trying to topple Winthrop
    • Assist. John Endicott - radical conservative, the fiery, militant leader of Salem


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Version 2.0 is now up and is filled with events. What-if candidates now have portraits. All candidates, what-if or regular, have unique colors. The election is also now using an "electoral vote" rather than a "popular vote". The EV stands for the number of votes that town had (number of voting officials). The popular vote stands for support power, rather than really popular vote. 

 

http://campaigns.270soft.com/2017/05/25/1637-massachusetts-gubernatorial-election/

Feedback is desired,

@jvikings1 @Patine @CalebsParadox @republicaninnyc @Reagan04 @The DM @SeanFKennedy @Sunnymentoaddict @TheMiddlePolitical @Conservative Elector 2 @koneke @pjw21200 @sasso

 

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6 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

@vcczar Dudley was a rival of Dudley's? Interesting.

Just imagine a Pitcairn Island Legislative Council (probably the most overrepresented legislative body above the local/municipal level in the world) election - there's only seven last names among permanent residents in circulation on the island. :P

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14 minutes ago, Patine said:

Just imagine a Pitcairn Island Legislative Council (probably the most overrepresented legislative body above the local/municipal level in the world) election - there's only seven last names among permanent residents in circulation on the island. :P

I'm not sure I'm familiar?

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4 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

I'm not sure I'm familiar?

Pitcairn Island, an isolated South Pacific Island and a remote British Overseas Territory, with a permanent population of 54 in one settlement (Adamstown) who are all direct descendants of the mutineers of the HMS Bounty and their Tahitian wives from the 18th Century.

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21 minutes ago, Patine said:

Pitcairn Island, an isolated South Pacific Island and a remote British Overseas Territory, with a permanent population of 54 in one settlement (Adamstown) who are all direct descendants of the mutineers of the HMS Bounty and their Tahitian wives from the 18th Century.

Nantucket was very much like this well into the 19th century. Nearly every surname in Nantucket for 200 years was Coffin, Starbuck, Macy, Coleman, Hussey, Swain, Folger, and about three others. I'm directly related to Tristram Coffin and Thomas Coleman, two of the founders. Tristram Coffin pretty much ruled the island for decades. They weren't puritans, some were even Anglicans. Pretty much every whaling ship had multiple people surnamed Coffin on them. Macy is the famous family that founded the department. Folger is the famous coffee family and founders of the Shakespeare library. Starbuck is the name of one of the characters in Melville's Moby Dick, and probably the namesake of Starbucks coffee. 

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

Nantucket was very much like this well into the 19th century. Nearly every surname in Nantucket for 200 years was Coffin, Starbuck, Macy, Coleman, Hussey, Swain, Folger, and about three others. I'm directly related to Tristram Coffin and Thomas Coleman, two of the founders. Tristram Coffin pretty much ruled the island for decades. They weren't puritans, some were even Anglicans. Pretty much every whaling ship had multiple people surnamed Coffin on them. Macy is the famous family that founded the department. Folger is the famous coffee family and founders of the Shakespeare library. Starbuck is the name of one of the characters in Melville's Moby Dick, and probably the namesake of Starbucks coffee. 

Actually, one of the early leaders of Pitcairn, and the main original spiritual leader, who possessed the HMS Bounty ship Bible, was named John Adams (Adamstown is named after him), but many historians call him Jack Adams, not just because that's what he was commonly called in his day, but to differentiate him in general 18th Century historical parlance from the 2nd U.S. President.

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@republicaninnyc

I saw your comment regarding the electoral/popular vote result. The reason I use the electoral vote is because only select members actually voted for the governor, deputy governor and assistants. That is, the Deputies of the General Court, assistants, deputy governor and governor, which was less than 40 people. I can't use a popular vote of 40 people because the game would be unplayable, as there would be more candidates than voters in some of the towns, especially if all the what-if candidates are turned on. Ideally, the vote would just be getting the endorsers to endorse you, and that translates to an automatic vote. But the engine doesn't allow that. 

As such, I use the popular vote to show the relative power of each town in the colony, and it acts as "support power," rather than as a popular vote, since there wasn't a popular vote for the governor. If a town supports a specific candidate, the delegate is likely to follow the whim of his town. The electoral vote, as a I say, stands for the specific vote of the leaders of that town for a candidate. I wish I could turn off benchmark number that has to be reached, so a straight majority of electoral votes would work. If I can figure out how to do this, then I will remove that barrier, or at least remove any candidate from "controlling" the Congress. 

Historically speaking, the leader in votes would become governor, the second place finisher would become deputy governor. They would then vote for 8 to 10 assistants to the governors, generally people who also received votes. They may have also voted for Deputies to the General Court at the same time, but this probably would have been done in the towns rather than at the General Court elections, since the records show only the new or reelected governors, dep. gov., and assistants. 

I'm wondering if @Patine @Reagan04 @Conservative Elector 2 @SirLagsalott have played the scenario yet. 

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

@republicaninnyc

I saw your comment regarding the electoral/popular vote result. The reason I use the electoral vote is because only select members actually voted for the governor, deputy governor and assistants. That is, the Deputies of the General Court, assistants, deputy governor and governor, which was less than 40 people. I can't use a popular vote of 40 people because the game would be unplayable, as there would be more candidates than voters in some of the towns, especially if all the what-if candidates are turned on. Ideally, the vote would just be getting the endorsers to endorse you, and that translates to an automatic vote. But the engine doesn't allow that. 

As such, I use the popular vote to show the relative power of each town in the colony, and it acts as "support power," rather than as a popular vote, since there wasn't a popular vote for the governor. If a town supports a specific candidate, the delegate is likely to follow the whim of his town. The electoral vote, as a I say, stands for the specific vote of the leaders of that town for a candidate. I wish I could turn off benchmark number that has to be reached, so a straight majority of electoral votes would work. If I can figure out how to do this, then I will remove that barrier, or at least remove any candidate from "controlling" the Congress. 

Historically speaking, the leader in votes would become governor, the second place finisher would become deputy governor. They would then vote for 8 to 10 assistants to the governors, generally people who also received votes. They may have also voted for Deputies to the General Court at the same time, but this probably would have been done in the towns rather than at the General Court elections, since the records show only the new or reelected governors, dep. gov., and assistants. 

I'm wondering if @Patine @Reagan04 @Conservative Elector 2 @SirLagsalott have played the scenario yet. 

I've only just re-installed all my TheorySpark games onto my new computer yesterday, and now plan to transfer my backed up fan-made scenarios (by both me and others), including unfinished projects, from my portable HD, then enter all the validation codes to unlock my games, and THEN I'll be able to give it a go.

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@vcczar I simulated through it actually. I did not play a whole game myself, but it was interesting to see how it developes as the Simulator character (I even like simulating more, than playing myself - not just with this scenario). Dudley won with 21 compared to Winthrop's 16. Endicott could win 4 EVs.

And I think it works good, and the portraits look really nice!! A great scenario, the only thing I noticed is, that in the end some cities are just reporting for instance 97 % of the votes, but the election night is over. I guess that's a small flaw within the game engine, however - and not with your scenario.

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1 hour ago, Conservative Elector 2 said:

@vcczar I simulated through it actually. I did not play a whole game myself, but it was interesting to see how it developes as the Simulator character (I even like simulating more, than playing myself - not just with this scenario). Dudley won with 21 compared to Winthrop's 16. Endicott could win 4 EVs.

And I think it works good, and the portraits look really nice!! A great scenario, the only thing I noticed is, that in the end some cities are just reporting for instance 97 % of the votes, but the election night is over. I guess that's a small flaw within the game engine, however - and not with your scenario.

That's strange. I'll see if I can fix it. I also like simulating more than playing, much of the time. 

 

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9 hours ago, vcczar said:

That's strange. I'll see if I can fix it. I also like simulating more than playing, much of the time. 

 

Oh it's just a minor thing. Don't worry.

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@vcczar

Alright, all my games are installed, updated, and activated, my computer settings in order, and my computer updated, and I will now give this and the other recently put out scenarios a try. But just one question, largely out of curiosity - it doesn't directly affect my playing of this particular scenario. Did the term New England for the rough region referred to nowadays exist as a referential term in colonial times before the political creation of the Dominion of New England in 1689, or was the term first coined to actually give a name to the political consolidation that briefly existed under Edmund Andros, and stuck as a term thereafter? I can't find a clear and concise answer or statement on that either way.

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12 minutes ago, Patine said:

@vcczar

Alright, all my games are installed, updated, and activated, my computer settings in order, and my computer updated, and I will now give this and the other recently put out scenarios a try. But just one question, largely out of curiosity - it doesn't directly affect my playing of this particular scenario. Did the term New England for the rough region referred to nowadays exist as a referential term in colonial times before the political creation of the Dominion of New England in 1689, or was the term first coined to actually give a name to the political consolidation that briefly existed under Edmund Andros, and stuck as a term thereafter? I can't find a clear and concise answer or statement on that either way.

It was coined in 1616, before a single settler moved to the region: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/john-smith-coined-the-term-new-england-on-this-1616-map-180953383/

 

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21 hours ago, vcczar said:

It was coined in 1616, before a single settler moved to the region: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/john-smith-coined-the-term-new-england-on-this-1616-map-180953383/

 

Another question that the answer is difficult to find. The Wikipedia article on the Dominion of New England says that, during it's existence between 1689-1692, it's legislative body was called the "New England Council," but has no separate link for that body, or much information at all (or really much mention otherwise) in the base article. Was this body elected by the colonists by any means or method, EVEN by indirect voting and/or stiff suffrage restrictions, or was it all just appointed by Andros upon arriving in Boston and/or brought with him from England?

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3 hours ago, Patine said:

Another question that the answer is difficult to find. The Wikipedia article on the Dominion of New England says that, during it's existence between 1689-1692, it's legislative body was called the "New England Council," but has no separate link for that body, or much information at all (or really much mention otherwise) in the base article. Was this body elected by the colonists by any means or method, EVEN by indirect voting and/or stiff suffrage restrictions, or was it all just appointed by Andros upon arriving in Boston and/or brought with him from England?

I could be incorrect, but I think it was appointed by Andros, or at least approved by him. 

Have you played the 1637 scenario yet?

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Just now, vcczar said:

I could be incorrect, but I think it was appointed by Andros, or at least approved by him. 

Have you played the 1637 scenario yet?

I'm still deciding whom to play. Who would you suggest?

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5 minutes ago, Patine said:

I'm still deciding whom to play. Who would you suggest?

It depends what you find more exciting:

1. Returning Winthrop to power?

2. Having Dudley emerge ahead of Winthrop, so as to no longer play second fiddle to him. 

3. Get Vane reelected and send Massachusetts on a more "liberal" trajectory? 

4. Win with Endicott and begin religious persecutions ahead of schedule. 

5. Pick one of the many what-if candidates, some of them former governors and future governors. 

6. Space bar through to watch the scenario with the Simulator party

I'd probably start with the simulator, just to get a feel for it. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

@vcczar

If I may ask, with this pretty much complete except for maybe a more attractive map at some future point (it's quite engaging, interesting, and educational on my first couple of plays, though I've thus far been unable to unseat Winthrop), is there any chance you'll do one of the several Republic of Texas Presidential scenarios in a similar light?

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9 hours ago, Patine said:

@vcczar

If I may ask, with this pretty much complete except for maybe a more attractive map at some future point (it's quite engaging, interesting, and educational on my first couple of plays, though I've thus far been unable to unseat Winthrop), is there any chance you'll do one of the several Republic of Texas Presidential scenarios in a similar light?

Maybe if someone else co-created it. Although born in Texas, and currently living here, I'm about to move from Texas for the 2nd time in my adult life. I'm not terribly interested in the history of Texas enough to build a scenario for it by myself; although, I know a lot about it and I've read several books about it. I think Massachusetts, and select mayoral elections in Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and San Francisco might be my limit for regional or local election scenarios. I also have slight interest in colonial Virginia elections.

As far as Texas goes, I've thought about making a fictional election for San Marcos, TX--which is probably the most pleasant place I've ever lived. Although, it's no longer what it used to be. It used be extremely affordable ($330 for a one bedroom apartment in a prime location), a downtown with a lot of things to do. Centrally located Coffee shops with really intelligent, well-read, interesting and often eccentric people of unusual talent, but no ambition for money or power. Coffee for a $1 with 25 cent refills A river that was permanently 72 degrees. Hills and greenery everywhere. Very walkable, not too much traffic. Almost zero crime. A good mix of differing ideologies, but the more interesting parts of town were primarily frequented by left-wing people, except for a sizable Libertarian minority. 30 minute drive to Austin and 45 minutes to San Antonio.  It was easy to know everyone that frequented downtown. I feel like everyone could have run for mayor, and not really had to get to know the voters. Population was about 20,000, if you didn't count the 30,000 college students that generally went home in Summer and Winter.  This was from about 2001-2007. Now the population has skyrocketed to about 100,000, as so many people want to work in Austin or live near it now. Prices have gone way up, and priced out the interesting people. Now it's filled with mainly future suburbanites that don't talk about anything other than their family and hipsters (or are they post-hipster?). I moved back here in 2013 after returning from NYC, and I went from knowing 90% of the people that frequented the downtown area to knowing about 5% of the people. It was like being in a dream, where you recognize the place, but everything isn't quite right and all the people have changed. I hope to write about my time in San Marcos at some point. 

If I ever get Prime Minister forever, I might do some of the Victorian Era elections, maybe go as early as the French Revolution-Napoleonic Wars. 

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6 hours ago, vcczar said:

Maybe if someone else co-created it. Although born in Texas, and currently living here, I'm about to move from Texas for the 2nd time in my adult life. I'm not terribly interested in the history of Texas enough to build a scenario for it by myself; although, I know a lot about it and I've read several books about it. I think Massachusetts, and select mayoral elections in Boston, NYC, Philadelphia, New Orleans, and San Francisco might be my limit for regional or local election scenarios. I also have slight interest in colonial Virginia elections.

As far as Texas goes, I've thought about making a fictional election for San Marcos, TX--which is probably the most pleasant place I've ever lived. Although, it's no longer what it used to be. It used be extremely affordable ($330 for a one bedroom apartment in a prime location), a downtown with a lot of things to do. Centrally located Coffee shops with really intelligent, well-read, interesting and often eccentric people of unusual talent, but no ambition for money or power. Coffee for a $1 with 25 cent refills A river that was permanently 72 degrees. Hills and greenery everywhere. Very walkable, not too much traffic. Almost zero crime. A good mix of differing ideologies, but the more interesting parts of town were primarily frequented by left-wing people, except for a sizable Libertarian minority. 30 minute drive to Austin and 45 minutes to San Antonio.  It was easy to know everyone that frequented downtown. I feel like everyone could have run for mayor, and not really had to get to know the voters. Population was about 20,000, if you didn't count the 30,000 college students that generally went home in Summer and Winter.  This was from about 2001-2007. Now the population has skyrocketed to about 100,000, as so many people want to work in Austin or live near it now. Prices have gone way up, and priced out the interesting people. Now it's filled with mainly future suburbanites that don't talk about anything other than their family and hipsters (or are they post-hipster?). I moved back here in 2013 after returning from NYC, and I went from knowing 90% of the people that frequented the downtown area to knowing about 5% of the people. It was like being in a dream, where you recognize the place, but everything isn't quite right and all the people have changed. I hope to write about my time in San Marcos at some point. 

If I ever get Prime Minister forever, I might do some of the Victorian Era elections, maybe go as early as the French Revolution-Napoleonic Wars. 

Some NYC mayorals to do:2009,1993,1989

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18 hours ago, republicaninnyc said:

Some NYC mayorals to do:2009,1993,1989

I was living in NYC for the 2009 election. I think the 1970s mayoral elections would have been interesting considering how much urban decay was going in certain parts of the city. 

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

I was living in NYC for the 2009 election. I think the 1970s mayoral elections would have been interesting considering how much urban decay was going in certain parts of the city. 

If you want to do a 1970's one I'd recommend you do 1977 as 1973 was heavily one-sided towards Abe Beame

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

I was living in NYC for the 2009 election. I think the 1970s mayoral elections would have been interesting considering how much urban decay was going in certain parts of the city. 

I remember in the original Ghostbusters movie (1982, I believe, or 1983), Egon Spangler says the neighbourhood around the shut-down old fire station they buy as a headquarters looks like a "demilitarized zone" (I believe referring to some footage of Berlin in the late '40's), as a reference to a lot of the urban decay in NYC at that time.

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