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#21 Chester A. Arthur's Legacy


Chester A. Arthur's Presidential Legacy  

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  1. 1. Which of the following Arthur decisions/events are positives for his legacy?

    • Signed the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act, which was opposed by the establishment.
    • While having been a Roscoe Conkling establishment crony, Arthur broke from his wing of the party and aimed for reform, angering his friends.
    • Tried to veto the Harbor and Rivers Act, which Arthur thought overly benefited the South
    • Signed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which significantly restricted immigration
    • Refurbished the White House into the showplace it is today for tourists, diplomats and special guests.
    • Ordered the wooden navy to be upgraded to a steel navy.
    • Established the Naval War College
    • Decided not to get too involved in the debate on whether or not to build a canal in Panama
    • Reached treaties with Latin America and Spain, which put him at odds with the protectionist establishment of the Republican Party
    • Appointed Roscoe Conkling, his old boss, to be a Supreme Court justice, despite his reputation as the corrupt New York political machine leader of the Republican Party. (Conkling decline the job)
    • Arguably prevented the Panic of 1884 from escalating through a bailout, possibly setting the precedent for government intervention in financial crises
    • Had a budget surplus, and maintained it.
    • Signed the slightly lower "Mongrel Tariff," which upset both parties
    • Proponent of hard money over soft money
    • Continued the Apache War
    • Opened more Native American Reservations to white settlement
    • Avoided major wars
    • Worked less than 8 hours a day on average
    • Was not renominated by his own party, primarily for a lack of attempted leadership
      0
    • None of the above
  2. 2. Who had/has had a more positive legacy as president?

    • Chester A. Arthur
    • Donald Trump
  3. 3. In general, your opinion of Arthur's presidency is...



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What were the advantages/disadvantages of both during Chester's presidency:  ''Proponent of hard money over soft money''  I could not really find something helpful and I can't figure it out, so I humbly ask you for clarifying. Was his position the conservative approach?

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13 minutes ago, Conservative Elector 2 said:

What were the advantages/disadvantages of both during Chester's presidency:  ''Proponent of hard money over soft money''  I could not really find something helpful and I can't figure it out, so I humbly ask you for clarifying. Was his position the conservative approach?

His monetary policy was Conservative. During the Civil War, Lincoln issues Greenbacks and bonds (soft money) because he needed a money supply to pay for the war (pay troops and supplies etc). Had he been a strict conservative Gold Standard, hard money politician only, he would not have been able to fund the war. By the time US Grant was in office, they were trying to revert back to hard money, but a new party, the Greenback Party, supported keeping the Greenback because they felt it was better for people that were involved in finance or overseas trade (and for other reasons). You also have people wanting to cause inflation in the money supply by adding silver, which would allow debtors to pay off their debts much easier. Arthur was definitely a conservative in about every sense, except for his aims at Reform, which were generally favored by the more "liberal" wing of his party, but also by both conservative and liberal/populist Democrats. But the short answer, yes, his position was the conservative approach, but it was also the traditional approach. 

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11 hours ago, vcczar said:

His monetary policy was Conservative. During the Civil War, Lincoln issues Greenbacks and bonds (soft money) because he needed a money supply to pay for the war (pay troops and supplies etc). Had he been a strict conservative Gold Standard, hard money politician only, he would not have been able to fund the war. By the time US Grant was in office, they were trying to revert back to hard money, but a new party, the Greenback Party, supported keeping the Greenback because they felt it was better for people that were involved in finance or overseas trade (and for other reasons). You also have people wanting to cause inflation in the money supply by adding silver, which would allow debtors to pay off their debts much easier. Arthur was definitely a conservative in about every sense, except for his aims at Reform, which were generally favored by the more "liberal" wing of his party, but also by both conservative and liberal/populist Democrats. But the short answer, yes, his position was the conservative approach, but it was also the traditional approach. 

Okay thank you for this explanation. I should have ticked off this box as well.

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That question #2 is quite interesting; i find the corrupt business-first Arthur to be quite similar to Trump in many ways, except that Trump isn't really interested in cleaning up the corruption he is helping proliferate. I reckon the GOP won't be renominating ol' Trumpy, either...

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