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1637 Massachusetts Election


vcczar

1637 Massachusetts Election  

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  1. 1. Would you be interested in downloading and playing the 1637 Massachusetts Election?

  2. 2. Would you be willing to make the 1637 Massachusetts map for me, since I can't seem to figure it out. (I'll send instructions on how it should look)

    • Yes, please send me a message or email.
    • No, because I don't know how, or I don't have the time.
  3. 3. Which of the candidates for 1637 are you most interested in playing as?

    • Incumbent governor Henry Vane of Boston, the 24-year-old relatively liberal Anne Hutchinson advocate, newly from England, as he seeks reelection.
    • Former governor, and current deputy governor, John Winthrop of Boston, the 49-year-old leading figure of Massachusetts government, who seeks to unseat Vane before he changes Puritan Massachusetts.
    • Former governor, and current assistant (magistrate), Thomas Dudley of Cambridge, the 60 year old consistent rival with Winthrop, who hopes to be the leading force of Massachusetts.
      0
    • Former (and first) governor, and current assistant (magistrate), John Endicott of Salem, 49-year-old leader of the radical separatist group of Puritans, mostly inhabiting Salem.


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12 minutes ago, vcczar said:

I've just focused on the more accessible trade markets. Trade elsewhere definitely occurred, but I'm not as knowledgeable on it. I know for instance that my ancestor John Tuttle operated ships in a triangle from Boston to Barbados to London. Trade with New France, New Amsterdam, New Sweden, Virginia, Maryland, etc. would probably be dictated by the level of intolerance and level of need for a good. Massachusetts Bay was incredibly closed off. As such, except when supplies were low, they probably didn't allow much imports. Exporting merchants, who probably cared more about money than God when they weren't having to put on as how when they were in the bay, probably ported their ships at any dock that was profitable. 

I'd like to read about their trade a little more. Thanks for bringing this up. 

Another issue about New France that's not trade related but very important. The border between New France and the English colonies was largely undefined, and English and French claims overlapped. I'm pretty sure that half of Massachusetts Bay was on some French maps as French colonial territory about then. This could lead to potentially big problems, and different factions might propose different potential solutions for the problems that could easily arise.

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

 

Here are the issues for 1637, if you are curious:

  • Relations with the Indians
  • Relations with Rhode Island
  • Relations with Plymouth Colony
  • Relations with Connecticut
  • Relations with England
  • Religious Tolerance
  • Covenant of Works vs. Covenant of Grace
  • Church of England
  • Church Polity
  • Strictness of Justice
  • Taxation
  • Pequot War
  • Expansion of Massachusetts Bay
  • Role of Government
  • Immigration
  • English Law
  • Establishing the College
  • Public School
  • Militia Organization
 

Those are rather interesting, looking at issues is always my favorite part. Will you be going from Far-Left to Far-Right, or just Left to Right. Many scenarios forgo the Far, how do you plan o executing it?

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58 minutes ago, Patine said:

Another issue about New France that's not trade related but very important. The border between New France and the English colonies was largely undefined, and English and French claims overlapped. I'm pretty sure that half of Massachusetts Bay was on some French maps as French colonial territory about then. This could lead to potentially big problems, and different factions might propose different potential solutions for the problems that could easily arise.

New France would be involved in this 1637 election. It may be added to a later election. I don't think the colony would have too much of a role in boundaries with another major power. The crown would probably have a larger role in that. 

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8 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

Those are rather interesting, looking at issues is always my favorite part. Will you be going from Far-Left to Far-Right, or just Left to Right. Many scenarios forgo the Far, how do you plan o executing it?

Good question. I made it the following way, since I think there was more uniformity, but also more objection to difference when they existed, as such I am using far-left, center-left, center-right and far-right. All others are "n/a". 

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Just now, vcczar said:

Good question. I made it the following way, since I think there was more uniformity, but also more objection to difference when they existed, as such I am using far-left, center-left, center-right and far-right. All others are "n/a". 

 

Interesting, so Right and Left are n/a? I havent seen it like that. Sure to be intriguing.

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9 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

Interesting, so Right and Left are n/a? I havent seen it like that. Sure to be intriguing.

right, left, and center are n/a

I think I'd probably maintain this system for colonial Massachusetts elections until the early 1700s when the Churches were mostly starting to relax, mostly because the English government forced tolerance a decade or two before, and Harvard started cranking out less dogmatic ministers. Harvard can probably be given the most credit for liberalizing Massachusetts. Soon they were cranking out proto-Unitarians, Unitarians and Unitarian-leaning preachers, and secularized the education by opening it up to law and medicine. These education people ended up leading the various towns. In addition, the high literacy rate and culture of reading in Massachusetts allowed for the swift spread of these ideas. The relatively closed-off nature of New England helped circulate it quicker and more constantly within it, without outside interference. They're much closer ties to London than the other colonies, allowed for more of an exchange of ideas from London, the intellectual capital of the world during that time. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, vcczar said:

right, left, and center are n/a

I think I'd probably maintain this system for colonial Massachusetts elections until the early 1700s when the Churches were mostly starting to relax, mostly because the English government forced tolerance a decade or two before, and Harvard started cranking out less dogmatic ministers. Harvard can probably be given the most credit for liberalizing Massachusetts. Soon they were cranking out proto-Unitarians, Unitarians and Unitarian-leaning preachers, and secularized the education by opening it up to law and medicine. These education people ended up leading the various towns. In addition, the high literacy rate and culture of reading in Massachusetts allowed for the swift spread of these ideas. The relatively closed-off nature of New England helped circulate it quicker and more constantly within it, without outside interference. They're much closer ties to London than the other colonies, allowed for more of an exchange of ideas from London, the intellectual capital of the world during that time. 

 

 

I hate to say it, but, despite usually viewed historically as a notorious figure of tyranny of arbitrary oppression, Edmund Andros also had a hand in such liberalization by ramming allowance of all English-derived protestant groups (including Anglicanism) to be allowed to set up churches and practice there religion in all parts of the short-lived Dominion of New England, even if he did it in a heavy-handed, authoritarian, ramming-it-down-their-throats sort of way (which had started with the notion of Andros saying, "I'm an Anglican and want an Anglican church in Boston, where I have been posted as colonial governor").

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31 minutes ago, Patine said:

I hate to say it, but, despite usually viewed historically as a notorious figure of tyranny of arbitrary oppression, Edmund Andros also had a hand in such liberalization by ramming allowance of all English-derived protestant groups (including Anglicanism) to be allowed to set up churches and practice there religion in all parts of the short-lived Dominion of New England, even if he did it in a heavy-handed, authoritarian, ramming-it-down-their-throats sort of way (which had started with the notion of Andros saying, "I'm an Anglican and want an Anglican church in Boston, where I have been posted as colonial governor").

I agree he was overall positive, but his methods, I think, were not well-advised. For instance, he destroyed the First Church of Boston, and built a stone (Puritan churches were wooden) church, which is still extant, called King's Chapel. However, he built much of it over the graveyard, so we lost the original burial spot of some of the famous colonial people, like Rev. John Cotton--the leading Puritan theologian, and some others. Harvard, the provincialness of Massachusetts, and the high literacy rate get equal credit with Andros in liberalizing Massachusetts. 

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@Patine @jvikings1 @Reagan04 @Sunnymentoaddict @TheMiddlePolitical @The DM @SeanFKennedy @CalebsParadox @pjw21200 @Conservative Elector 2

Here are the events for the 1637 scenario. Hopefully, I can get a workable map so this scenario can be finished:

1636-
July 1 - Rev. Thomas Shepard of Newtown (Cambridge) warns Rev. John Cotton of Boston that his "Free Grace" theology is misconstrued by the laity, which may develop into a larger problem. 
July 2 - Three men are given six lashes for drunkeness
July 3 - Endicott and some conservative protest Gov. Vane's decision to fly the English flag at the Fort in Boston, since the Cross of St. George looks Catholic.
July 5 - Rev. Roger Williams's settlement in Providence (Rhode Island) is said to be doing well. We wish the best for our misguided friend. 
July 10 - The new colony at Hartford could be easily attacked by Native tribes. 
July 15 - Anne Hutchinson faction heats up, as she begins to hold religious meetings at her house. 
July 17 - Itinerant minister Rev. John Wheelwright discuss the qualities of Rev. Cotton's theology with Anne Hutchinson. 
July 20 - Capt. John Oldham killed by Pequot Indians at Block Island!
August 1 - Endicott sent by Gov. Vane to retaliate on Pequot Indians at Block Island
August 15 - Endicott attacks two Niantic Indian villages
August 15 - A covenant at Dedham is signed, creating a new town in Massachusetts Bay
August 20 - Thomas Dudley suggests that Dep. Gov. John Winthrop is exerting too much on the government. 
September 1 - William Pynchon founds a settlement called Agawam (Springfield)
September 7 - Robert Shorthose has his tongue placed in a cleft for saying the Lord's name in vain. 
September 8 - The General Court establishes a college in Newtown (Cambridge) to be called New College (Harvard). 
September 9 - James Clarke released on false charges of fornication. 
September 9 - Dedham recognized as a new town. 
September 11 - Peter Bussaker given 20 lashes for drunkeness.
September 15 - Edward Woodley given 30 lashes and a year's imprisonment for tresspassing and attempted rape. 
Setpember 20 - Elizabeth Appletgate has her tonge placed in a cleft for swearing.
October 1 - Pequots besiege Saybrook in Connecticut Colony
October 15 - Plymouth Colony founds a town called Scituate
October 17 - Anne Hutchinson criticizes Rev. John Wilson's theology, saying it's a weak comparison to Rev. John Cotton's.
October 18 - Anne Hutchinson declares that all the ministers in Massachusetts Bay are unable ministers, except for Rev. Cotton. 
October 20 - Rev's Cotton and Wheelwright meet with Anne Hutchinson over her recent remarks. 
October 21 - John Winthrop identifies Anne Hutchinson as dangerous to the colony. 
October 22 - Rev. Wheelwright and Anne Hutchinson increase their communication with one another. 
October 25 - Rev. Cotton meets with seven ministers to discuss the Hutchinson problem. 
October 26 - Chausop, a Pequot Indian, is sentenced to be a slave for life by the General Court
October 27 - Seven members of the General Court fined for not arriving by 9am
October 28 - Mr. Thomas Mayhew is fined for the 3rd day in a row for being late to his General Court duties. . 
Dec 1 - Boston Congregation clearly under the spell of Anne Hutchinson.
Dec 6 - Will Clarke, convicted of several thefts, sentenced to be whipped and deported back to England. 
Dec 7. - Anthony Robinson to received 20 lashes after confessing to fornication on three occasions.  
Dec 13 - The General Court organizes three militia to protect the colony against possible Pequot attack.
Dec 14 - The three militia to be led each by John Winthrop, John Haynes and John Endicott with Gov. Vane commanding. Thomas Dudley, Roger Harlakenden, and John Winthrop, Jr. will assist the militia heads.
Dec 15 - Rev. Wheelwright clearly under the spell of Anne Hutchinson. 
Dec. 17 Gov. Vane clearly under the spell of Anne Hutchinson
Dec 20 - Boston Congregation asks that Rev. Wheelwright replace Rev. Wilson as the second pastor with Rev. Cotton. 
Dec 21 - Rev. Wilson vocalizes his opposition to Anne Hutchinson's religious views, upsetting much of the congregation. 
Dec 22 - John Winthrop intercedes for Rev. Wilson, supporting Rev. Cotton in keeping Rev. Wilson in the Boston Congregation. 
Dec. 23 - Cotton defends Wilson as minister, but admonishes him for speaking out against Anne Hutchinson. 
Dec. 25 - Rev. Wilson gives conciliatory sermon, causing Gov. Vane to applaud it loudly. 
Dec. 27 - Gov. Vane prevented from resigning by the Boston Congregation, after the General Court accepts his resignation. 
Dec 30 - Rev. Wheelwright sent to preach at Mt. Wollaston 
 
1637
Jan 1 - Hutchinson and her followers begin to journey through Massachusetts, criticizing the orthodox ministers. 
Jan 10 - Hutchinson and her followers walk out of a sermon by Rev. Wilson. 
Jan 15 - Rev. Cotton invites Rev. Wheelwright to give a sermon. 
Jan 17 - Boston becomes deeply divided on the Hutchinson issue, as ministers are becoming pitted against one another. 
Jan 19 - A day of fasting and repentance is called 
Jan 19 - Rev. Wheelright gives sermon in Boston
Jan 20 - Wheelright's sermon upsets conservative factions; Cotton calls the sermon, "ill-advised, but valid in content." 
Jan 30 - John Winthrop states that Gov. Vane is exacerbating the Hutchinson issue into a major problem for the colony. 
April - Dorothy Talbye of Salem put in chains for assaulting her husband.
April 23 - Pequots raid Wethersfield in Connecticut Colony!
March 7 - Weybro Lovell is admonished for "light and whoreish behavior," and ordered to repent.
March 8 - William James sentenced to the stocks in Boston and Salem for fornicating with his wife before their marriage.
March 9 - Rev. Wheelwright accused of contempt and sedition by the court. 
March 10 - Wheelwright meets with the court, which criticizes the theology of Wheelwright and Cotton as being too different than other ministers.
March 10 - Rev. Cotton defends himself, accusing the court of tying him to Rev. Wheelwright.
March 11 -  Court backs down on Rev. Cotton but aims to force Wheelwright to repent.
March 12 - Rev. Wheelwright refused to repent; accusation of contempt and sedition is upheld for trial at a later date. 
March 13 - Protestors protest the courts decision on Rev. Wheelwright
March 14 - The court defies the protestors 
March 15 - Thomas Petitt is sentence to be whipped and placed in the stocks for slander. 
April 1 - Winthrop and Dudley work together to move the governor election to Newtown (Cambridge) instead of Boston, where most of Gov. Vane's support lives.
April 3 - Gov. Vane reluctantly agrees to send soldiers to assist other colonies in destroying the Pequot Indians. 
April 5 - Gov. Vane unable to convince the General Court to keep the upcoming election in Boston. 
April 30 - King Charles I issues a proclaimation to stem immigration to the New World. 
May 1 - A colonial militia is formed to combat the Pequot in Connecticut
May 10 - Dudley suggests that Winthrop, Endicott or himself should banish followers of Hutchinson and Wheelwright should one of them defeat Vane on May 17.
May 12 - Winthrop and Dudley agree to influence the deputies to vote down magistrates that favor Hutchinson and Wheelwright.
May 15 - Gov. Vane asks that a petition in defense of Rev. Wheelwright be read.
May 16 - Winthrop and Dudley block Vane's petition until after the voting. 
May 16 - Winthrop, and Endicott expected to force Vane out of the government if they win. 
May 16 - Winthrop and Endicott expected to expel Hutchinson, Wheelwright and their followers should they win; Dudley on the fence. 
May 17 - election
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6 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

@vcczar one critique, you seem to love the months April and March.

Oh yeah, those two April's between Jan and March should be Feb

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Endorsers nearly done. 

I've just about created all of the endorsers for the 1637 scenario. These are all town leaders for the voting towns. 

The names at the very bottom are the ones I'm still researching to figure out where they are from. These names are from the Massachusetts Bay Colony governmental records.

An * in the names means that they're one of my many Massachusetts ancestors:

Boston:
Atherton Haugh, assistant/magistrate
John Winthrop, deputy governor and former governor
Henry Vane, governor
Richard Bellingham, assistant/magistrate, and future governor
Rev. John Wheelwright, controversial theologian 
Rev. John Cotton, the leading theologian of the colony
Rev. John Wilson 
John Coggeshall 
William Aspinwall 
William Coddington 
Lt. Thomas Savage 
John Clarke 
William Hutchinson, husband of Anne Hutchinson
Anne Hutchinson, the black sheep of the colony
William Baulston 
Edward Hutchinson, adult son of Anne Hutchinson
Richard Gridley 
Thomas Marshall 
William Dyer 
William Dinely 
Capt. John Underhill, leading military figure in the Pequot War
Robert Keayne
Jonathan Fairbanks
Dr. Thomas Oliver 
Anthony Colby, ancestor of the namesake of Colby Cheese
William Dawes, ancestor of all the famous Dawes's from US history
Rev. William Skepper
Edward Raynsford 
Christopher Batt
John Leverett, future governor
Samuel Cole 
William Rainsford 
John Sanford
Thomas Wheeler 
William Freeborn
Mr. Cane
 
Cambridge:
Thomas Dudley, assistant/magistrate and former governor
Roger Halarkenden, assistant/magistrate
John Haynes, former governor
Rev. Thomas Shepard 
*Gregory Stone* 
*John Benjamin*
Daniel Denison
Nathaniel Hancock, ancestor of John Hancock
*Barnabas Lambson*
*Nathaniel Sparhawk*
Herbert Pelham
William Goodwin
William Spencer
John Talcott
Matthew Allen
Joseph Cooke
Nicholas Danforth
John Bridge
Richard Jackson
Edward Goffe
Simon Crosby
 
Roxbury:
William Pynchon, founder of Springfield and ancestor of novelist Thomas Pynchon
Joseph Weld 
Rev. John Eliot 
Rev. Thomas Weld 
*Griffin Crafts* 
William Parke
Ralph Hemingway, ancestor of Ernest Hemingway
Samuel Chapin
*John Johnson*
Israel Heath
 
Dorchester:
Israel Stoughton, magistrate/assistant
George Minot
John Glover
Richard Collicott
*Humphrey Atherton*, future commanding general of Massachusetts militia
Rev. Richard Mather, grandfather of Cotton Mather of the Salem Witch Trials
*John Whitcomb*
*James Bate*
William Sumner, ancestor of abolitionist senator Charles Sumner
William Phelps
 
Charlestown: 
Rev. Zechariah Symmes 
Rev. John Harvard, namesake of the university
Ralph Mousall
John Mousall
Thomas Line
Robert Sedgwick, ancestor of Civil War general John Sedgwick
Ezekiel Richardson
Ralph Sprague
Edward Converse
Thomas Beecher
William Frothingham
Isaac Johnson
Dr. Richard Palgrave
John Mansfeld
Increase Nowell, assistant/magistrate
George Bunker, ancestor of the namesake of Bunker Hill

Saugus:
Edmund Ingalls 
Adams Hawkes
Thomas Dexter
John Humphrey, former deputy governor
Daniel Howe
Timothy Tomlins
 
Watertown:
William Jennison
Thomas Mayhew, future first European resident of Nantucket
Richard Browne
*Isaac Stearns*
*John Barnard*
*Thomas Carter,*future reverend, sometimes said to be the first minister ordained in American
*Henry Curtis*
Joseph Morse
Samuel Morse
Rev. George Phillips
John Sherman?
Robert Feake, known in Massachusetts history more for his controversial wife
 
Newbury:
Richard Dummer, namesake of the badly named Dummer Academy
*Rev. James Noyes*
Rev. Thomas Parker 
*Robert Adams*
*Thomas Coleman*
John Spencer 
John Oliver
*Nicholas Busby*
Robert Pike
*John Pike*
*Edmund Greenleaf*
John Emery
Henry Sewell, son of a former mayor of London
Edward Woodman
John Woodbridge, future founder of Woodbridge, New Jersey
 
Ipswich:
John Winthrop Jr, assistant/magistrate, son of John Winthrop and future governor of Connecticut
*Samuel Appleton*, ancestor of the Boston Brahmin Appleton's of mercantile and philanthropic fame
Simon Bradstreet, assistant/magistrate and future governor
Joseph Metcalf
Richard Saltonstall Jr, son of Sir Richard Saltonstall, who was a founder of Massachusetts Bay Colony
*John Tuttle*
*John Cogswell*
Rev. Nathaniel Ward
John Perkins, ancestor of another Boston Brahmin family known for their mercantile and philanthropic activities
*Richard Jacob*
William Moody
Nathaniel Rogers
Mr. William (?) Bartholomew
 
Weymouth:
Henry Adams, ancestor of John Adams and John Quincy Adams
Rev. Joseph Hull 
Edmund Quincy, ancestor of John Quincy Adams
Thomas Thayer
William Torrey
John Upham
William Smythe
 
Hingham:
Samuel Lincoln, ancestor of Abraham Lincoln
Rev. Peter Hobart
John Leavitt
Thomas Loring
Anthony Eames
Joseph Andrews
 
Salem:
John Endicott, assistant/magistrate and former governor
Lt. Danford (?)
*Charles Gott*
Rev. Hugh Peters 
*Joseph Batchelder*
*Joseph Grafton*
Roger Conant, Salem's first leader before the arrival of Endicott
*Moses Maverick,* brother of Samuel Maverick, who was one of the original landowners of Boston before Winthrop
William Hawthorne, ancestor of Nathaniel Hawthorne
Townsend Bishop
Robert Codman
John Throckmorton
William Trask
John Holgrave
Thomas Gardner, leading citizen, having been in Salem since 1624. 
Edmond Batter
Jeffrey Massey
Philip Verrin
John Balch
Ralph Fogg
Robert Moulton
 
Concord:
Rev. Peter Bulkely 
*Lt. Simon Willard,* bought Concord from the Native Americans
Thomas Brooks
James Hosmer
 
Still verifying the locations for these often-mentioned men:
Mr. Gibbons
Mr. Alcock
Mr. Chaplain
George Cooke
John Coxcall
William Swain
George Hull
William Gallerd
Capt. Turner
Johne Burseley
Mr. Bishop
Mr. Blackleach
Nicholas Baker
Edward Dillingham
Abraham Palmer
Joseph Wells
William Reade
William Brenton
William Colbron
John Kirman
Thomas Scruggs
Richard Browne
Bryan Pendleton
Lt. Davenport
William Heath
Thomas White
Lt. Duncan
William Gaylord
Thomas Cakebread
Thomas Underwood
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3 hours ago, vcczar said:

Endorsers nearly done. 

I've just about created all of the endorsers for the 1637 scenario. These are all town leaders for the voting towns. 

The names at the very bottom are the ones I'm still researching to figure out where they are from. These names are from the Massachusetts Bay Colony governmental records.

An * in the names means that they're one of my many Massachusetts ancestors:

Boston:
Atherton Haugh, assistant/magistrate
John Winthrop, deputy governor and former governor
Henry Vane, governor
Richard Bellingham, assistant/magistrate, and future governor
Rev. John Wheelwright, controversial theologian 
Rev. John Cotton, the leading theologian of the colony
Rev. John Wilson 
John Coggeshall 
William Aspinwall 
William Coddington 
Lt. Thomas Savage 
John Clarke 
William Hutchinson, husband of Anne Hutchinson
Anne Hutchinson, the black sheep of the colony
William Baulston 
Edward Hutchinson, adult son of Anne Hutchinson
Richard Gridley 
Thomas Marshall 
William Dyer 
William Dinely 
Capt. John Underhill, leading military figure in the Pequot War
Robert Keayne
Jonathan Fairbanks
Dr. Thomas Oliver 
Anthony Colby, ancestor of the namesake of Colby Cheese
William Dawes, ancestor of all the famous Dawes's from US history
Rev. William Skepper
Edward Raynsford 
Christopher Batt
John Leverett, future governor
Samuel Cole 
William Rainsford 
John Sanford
Thomas Wheeler 
William Freeborn
Mr. Cane
 
Cambridge:
Thomas Dudley, assistant/magistrate and former governor
Roger Halarkenden, assistant/magistrate
John Haynes, former governor
Rev. Thomas Shepard 
*Gregory Stone* 
*John Benjamin*
Daniel Denison
Nathaniel Hancock, ancestor of John Hancock
*Barnabas Lambson*
*Nathaniel Sparhawk*
Herbert Pelham
William Goodwin
William Spencer
John Talcott
Matthew Allen
Joseph Cooke
Nicholas Danforth
John Bridge
Richard Jackson
Edward Goffe
Simon Crosby
 
Roxbury:
William Pynchon, founder of Springfield and ancestor of novelist Thomas Pynchon
Joseph Weld 
Rev. John Eliot 
Rev. Thomas Weld 
*Griffin Crafts* 
William Parke
Ralph Hemingway, ancestor of Ernest Hemingway
Samuel Chapin
*John Johnson*
Israel Heath
 
Dorchester:
Israel Stoughton, magistrate/assistant
George Minot
John Glover
Richard Collicott
*Humphrey Atherton*, future commanding general of Massachusetts militia
Rev. Richard Mather, grandfather of Cotton Mather of the Salem Witch Trials
*John Whitcomb*
*James Bate*
William Sumner, ancestor of abolitionist senator Charles Sumner
William Phelps
 
Charlestown: 
Rev. Zechariah Symmes 
Rev. John Harvard, namesake of the university
Ralph Mousall
John Mousall
Thomas Line
Robert Sedgwick, ancestor of Civil War general John Sedgwick
Ezekiel Richardson
Ralph Sprague
Edward Converse
Thomas Beecher
William Frothingham
Isaac Johnson
Dr. Richard Palgrave
John Mansfeld
Increase Nowell, assistant/magistrate
George Bunker, ancestor of the namesake of Bunker Hill

Saugus:
Edmund Ingalls 
Adams Hawkes
Thomas Dexter
John Humphrey, former deputy governor
Daniel Howe
Timothy Tomlins
 
Watertown:
William Jennison
Thomas Mayhew, future first European resident of Nantucket
Richard Browne
*Isaac Stearns*
*John Barnard*
*Thomas Carter,*future reverend, sometimes said to be the first minister ordained in American
*Henry Curtis*
Joseph Morse
Samuel Morse
Rev. George Phillips
John Sherman?
Robert Feake, known in Massachusetts history more for his controversial wife
 
Newbury:
Richard Dummer, namesake of the badly named Dummer Academy
*Rev. James Noyes*
Rev. Thomas Parker 
*Robert Adams*
*Thomas Coleman*
John Spencer 
John Oliver
*Nicholas Busby*
Robert Pike
*John Pike*
*Edmund Greenleaf*
John Emery
Henry Sewell, son of a former mayor of London
Edward Woodman
John Woodbridge, future founder of Woodbridge, New Jersey
 
Ipswich:
John Winthrop Jr, assistant/magistrate, son of John Winthrop and future governor of Connecticut
*Samuel Appleton*, ancestor of the Boston Brahmin Appleton's of mercantile and philanthropic fame
Simon Bradstreet, assistant/magistrate and future governor
Joseph Metcalf
Richard Saltonstall Jr, son of Sir Richard Saltonstall, who was a founder of Massachusetts Bay Colony
*John Tuttle*
*John Cogswell*
Rev. Nathaniel Ward
John Perkins, ancestor of another Boston Brahmin family known for their mercantile and philanthropic activities
*Richard Jacob*
William Moody
Nathaniel Rogers
Mr. William (?) Bartholomew
 
Weymouth:
Henry Adams, ancestor of John Adams and John Quincy Adams
Rev. Joseph Hull 
Edmund Quincy, ancestor of John Quincy Adams
Thomas Thayer
William Torrey
John Upham
William Smythe
 
Hingham:
Samuel Lincoln, ancestor of Abraham Lincoln
Rev. Peter Hobart
John Leavitt
Thomas Loring
Anthony Eames
Joseph Andrews
 
Salem:
John Endicott, assistant/magistrate and former governor
Lt. Danford (?)
*Charles Gott*
Rev. Hugh Peters 
*Joseph Batchelder*
*Joseph Grafton*
Roger Conant, Salem's first leader before the arrival of Endicott
*Moses Maverick,* brother of Samuel Maverick, who was one of the original landowners of Boston before Winthrop
William Hawthorne, ancestor of Nathaniel Hawthorne
Townsend Bishop
Robert Codman
John Throckmorton
William Trask
John Holgrave
Thomas Gardner, leading citizen, having been in Salem since 1624. 
Edmond Batter
Jeffrey Massey
Philip Verrin
John Balch
Ralph Fogg
Robert Moulton
 
Concord:
Rev. Peter Bulkely 
*Lt. Simon Willard,* bought Concord from the Native Americans
Thomas Brooks
James Hosmer
 
Still verifying the locations for these often-mentioned men:
Mr. Gibbons
Mr. Alcock
Mr. Chaplain
George Cooke
John Coxcall
William Swain
George Hull
William Gallerd
Capt. Turner
Johne Burseley
Mr. Bishop
Mr. Blackleach
Nicholas Baker
Edward Dillingham
Abraham Palmer
Joseph Wells
William Reade
William Brenton
William Colbron
John Kirman
Thomas Scruggs
Richard Browne
Bryan Pendleton
Lt. Davenport
William Heath
Thomas White
Lt. Duncan
William Gaylord
Thomas Cakebread
Thomas Underwood

This must have been half the freemen of the colony... :P

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9 hours ago, Patine said:

This must have been half the freemen of the colony... :P

Haha. Actually, believe it or not, I don't even think it's a quarter of them. I'm probably actually forgetting some people, because I can't find a list of the selectmen for the separate towns; although, I probably have most of them on here. 

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I've done some research and a made a list of all the Governors, Deputy Governors, Assistants, Magistrates, Selectmen, Deputies to the General Court, Ministers and Military officers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1632-1637. Whenever I can get a working map, I'll be able to do all the annual governor's elections within this time frame. If these become popular, I'll then do the interesting elections after 1637--meaning the ones in which there are some sort of crisis--Quaker problem, Salem Witch Trial, King Phillip's War, etc. 

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With Anthony's help, I think I figured out how to make the 1637 map workable. Turns out, I didn't know the top left button was a drop down menu, so my own ignorance was the reason the map editor wasn't working for me. I hope to have this scenario out soon (within a week)

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@Patine @jvikings1 @Conservative Elector 2

So I had an error in the map. As you can see, Salem and the area outside the circle are the same color, and John Endicott's marker is out of Salem's circle. Lastly, Endicott has 60% of the popular vote, when he should be in 4th place. I know my population numbers are as I want them to be. I'm assuming the outside circle area is somehow messing up the numbers. There are no regions other than those in the circles. I deleted any other regions. 

Any clue why this is happening? Thanks. 

 

Mass1637Screenshot.jpg

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8 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

There are probably multiple fill positions.  I have made this mistake before when editing scenerios.

Are you saying that you think I clicked two fill ins for Salem? How do undo it if that's the case? 

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

Are you saying that you think I clicked two fill ins for Salem? How do undo it if that's the case? 

Yes.  In the editor, go to regions, and then Salem.  In the Salem region, click on map.  Look at the drop down labels fill positions.  Click on that to check if there are more than one.

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34 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

Yes.  In the editor, go to regions, and then Salem.  In the Salem region, click on map.  Look at the drop down labels fill positions.  Click on that to check if there are more than one.

Ok. I'll do that and get back to you. Thanks for the advice. 

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Update: It will be mid to late April until I finish this scenario. I have all the notes for the events and endorsers, but I still have to implement those. As a college professor, I won't have much time at the moment. My workload will ease up in 3 to 4 works for a week or two. 

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@vcczar

 

I remember reading an article linked from my old homepage several years by a professor from Massachusetts whose name slips my mind, who, like you, had (or claimed to have, anyways) a lot of ancestors in the Massachusetts Bay Colony (he claimed his family and Senator John Cabot Lodge's were two branches of the same family), and he taught at a smaller university in the state the eminent Harvard, MIT, or University of Massachusetts. He claimed that the number of executions and unwinnable trials of ordeal for strictly religious offences that are not crimes today (witchcraft, sorcery, blasphemy, heresy, sacrilege, homosexuality, Devil worship, etc.) were highly overstated by historians and were actually very rare, and that putting people in the stocks, public floggings, or banishment was much, in truth, much more common. I believe this person had also edited the official Wikipedia article on the Massachusetts Bay Colony with that statement as well, but it's been edited several times since. Is there truth in this statement, or is it Puritan apologism or revisionism?

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