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#7 Andrew Jackson Legacy


Andrew Jackson's Legacy  

21 members have voted

  1. 1. Which of the following Jackson decisions/events are positives for his legacy?

    • Threatened to invade South Carolina if they went through with their threats of secession during the Nullification Crisis.
    • Vetoed the renewal of the National Bank
    • Appointed offices by party loyalty over merit ("Spoils System")
    • Signed the Indian Removal Act, and starting acting on it immediately
    • Agreed to slightly lower the tariff to diffuse the Nullification Crisis
    • Reached a trade agreement with Great Britain to open trade with the British West Indies
    • Allowed Southern postmasters to block abolitionist tracts from being sent to slave owners
    • Recognized the sovereignty of the recently independent Republic of Texas
    • Appointed Chief Justice Roger B. Taney, who would later preside over the controversial Dred Scott decision.
    • Promoted greater Democracy among the states, including an expanded popular vote during national elections and extending other voting rights (However, it still applied only to White males at the time).
    • Enhance the powers of the presidency by making it into an office that acts for, "The Will of the People!"
    • Opposed the powers of the elites and aimed to put the powers of the three branches of government under the influence of the "Common Man."
    • Vetoed more legislation than all previous presidents combined
    • Won reelection and was popular enough to be followed by a successor
    • Elevated the Democratic Party into a permanent fixture in American political history
    • Vetoed a major infrastructure bill to create a road to the Ohio River
    • Mostly avoided his official cabinet for an unofficial "Kitchen Cabinet"
    • Made about 70 treaties with Native Tribes, but broke nearly as many as well.
    • Inaugurated the Second Seminole War, as part of the Indian Relocation platform.
    • None of the Above
  2. 2. part 2 of the above

    • Increased funding and support for military pensions
    • Instituted the policy of "rotation in office" to combat corruption, life-term bureaucrats and because it was more Democratic
    • Imports increased 250% under Jackson; Exports (mostly Cotton) increased 75%.
    • Rejected paper money, insisting on gold and silver coins only ("Specie Circular"), which is often considered a leading cause of the Panic of 1837.
    • Did not intervene in the early stages of the Panic of 1837, which was felt primarily in Van Buren's term.
    • The first president to be censured by the US Senate for removing funds from US Banks
    • Did not believe in the use of federal funding for exploring expeditions, but relented late in his presidency.
    • Under Van Buren's guidance, Jackson set the precedent for "permanent opposition" between political parties, forcing politicians and voters to pick sides.
    • Moved the Democratic Convention date up to ensure that opposition to his successor, Van Buren, could not find an alternate candidate in time.
    • Left the longest-lasting influence on the Supreme Court, with several justice still serving at the outbreak of the Civil War
    • Had an iron-gripped leadership over his party, even in death, as all Democratic nominees from Van Buren (1836) to Stephan A. Douglas (1860) claimed to be the heir of Jackson
    • While a supporter of States Rights, he was first a strong Unionist, setting an example for Abraham Lincoln.
    • His expanding of the powers of the presidency and the government are seen as the starting point of the Modern Presidency, setting an example for Lincoln, both Roosevelt's, LBJ and others.
    • Kept JQ Adams's "Tariff of Abominations," a high, pro-Northern tariff, which angered the South, and led to the Nullification Crisis.
    • Victory in the brief Black Hawk war cleared more land for white settlement in Illinois and Michigan.
    • Avoided major wars
    • Forced the French, through threat of military retaliation, to pay for ships damaged during the Napoleonic War.
    • Attempt to buy Texas from Mexico (failed), refused to go to war with Mexico to get Texas, when advised to do so.
    • Sent the navy to destroy a village in Sumatra, after some the tribesmen on that Asian island attacked an American trade vessel, killing two.
    • None of the above
  3. 3. Overall, what is your general opinion of Jackson's presidency?



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Here's Jackson's poll, which will be used towards a forum ranking. 

Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, JQ Adams have polls in this forum.

Please take these polls if you have not done so already. 

If anyone needs clarification/definition of an event/decision, then I'll be glad to provide one. 

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@vcczar

Ah, Andrew "the Beast" Jackson! I had uncertain and mixed feelings about the recognition of the Republic of Texas and his Presidency supposedly ruled by the "common man," largely due to the short term historical consequences of the first and the way he approached and envisioned the second, personally. As for currency, I myself believe currency SHOULD have SOMETHING solid backing it, as the absolute disaster in the modern day of a constant roller-coaster ride of "bull-and-bear" global economics, of which fiat currency is one of the biggest contributing factors, clearly demonstrates. I just don't think gold and silver are up to snuff for the job. Thus, I left all three blank.

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I think his fiscal policy was terrible, the Indian Removal Act/Trail of Tears is one of the biggest stains on American history along with slavery and Japanese internment, and I've come to have a distaste for populism for the sake of populism as of late. He's probably my least favorite President, though Nixon's not far behind and I'll wait to rate Trump until he's out of office (so probably either in a month or two, or after the 2018 midterms).

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2 hours ago, JohnnyK said:

Jackson was the only U.S. President to ELIMINATE the debt where is that on this list?

The national debt in his day was literally pocket change compared to what we see in the latter half of the 20th Century as well as the 21st Century thus far...

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1 hour ago, Patine said:

The national debt in his day was literally pocket change compared to what we see in the latter half of the 20th Century as well as the 21st Century thus far...

I didn't see @JohnnyK's comment since he's blocked, but I'll answer it since I see it through Patine's reply. I didn't include it for two reasons. 1) I ran out of spaces for events/decision and, 2) James Monroe and especially JQ Adams payed off the majority of the debt, and Jackson just finished the tail end of the job. I'll also add that Patine is correct in that the debt, especially when Jackson took office, wasn't that much. On top of this, the Jackson and Adams supporters were both aiming to pay off the debt, so it was inevitable. Lastly, the debt went back up before he left office; although, it was close to zero. He did have a balanced budget, but a lot of presidents have done that. 

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I'm not shocked that Jackson is seen as unfavorable, considering that he's tanked in the rankings since the Civil Rights fights became popular in the 1960s. 

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On 2/22/2017 at 7:23 PM, Patine said:

@vcczar

I myself believe currency SHOULD have SOMETHING solid backing it, as the absolute disaster in the modern day of a constant roller-coaster ride of "bull-and-bear" global economics, of which fiat currency is one of the biggest contributing factors, clearly demonstrates. I just don't think gold and silver are up to snuff for the job. Thus, I left all three blank.

One of the causes of the depression was that the supply of gold couldn't keep up with the demand for cash.  Any attempt to return to a fixed currency standard would likely face the same issue.

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