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Particularly Strong 3rd Party Preformance


QuickHead555

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So the votes are still being tallied, but now we have a pretty good idea on how things stand with the 3rd Party candidates. Here are the results of it currently

NUMBERS ON 11/10

PERCENTS

GARY JOHNSON: 3.24%

JILL STEIN: 0.97%

EVAN MCMULLIN: 0.37%

 

VOTE COUNTS:

GARY JOHNSON: 4,125,000

JILL STEIN: 1,234,000

EVAN MCMULLIN: 475,000

WRITE-INS: 526,000

 

NUMBERS ON 11/21

PERCENTS

GARY JOHNSON: 3.28%

JILL STEIN: 1.02%

EVAN MCMULLIN: 0.41%

 

VOTE COUNTS:

GARY JOHNSON: 4,368,000

JILL STEIN: 1,361,000

EVAN MCMULLIN: 545,000

WRITE-INS: 749,000

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If the Libertarians had even a half decent candidate they'd have qualified for federal matching funds next cycle worth more than every dollar they'd raised this year.

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On 11/11/2016 at 6:24 PM, VanMav said:

If the Libertarians had even a half decent candidate they'd have qualified for federal matching funds next cycle worth more than every dollar they'd raised this year.

Weld should have been at the top of the ticket. I think they made a good move of not having a pure Libertarian. They would have been stuck at 1% of the vote if they had. Pure Libertarianism isn't attractive to most people that aren't already Libertarians. Johnson/Weld, to their credit, made their party more palatable to more people. 

The conundrum is whether or not a Libertarian Party that hit 5% would except federal funds that are raised through tax dollars. 

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7 hours ago, vcczar said:

Weld should have been at the top of the ticket. I think they made a good move of not having a pure Libertarian. They would have been stuck at 1% of the vote if they had. Pure Libertarianism isn't attractive to most people that aren't already Libertarians. Johnson/Weld, to their credit, made their party more palatable to more people. 

The conundrum is whether or not a Libertarian Party that hit 5% would except federal funds that are raised through tax dollars. 

There is a quickly growing part of the Republican Party, especially among younger voters, that leans Libertarian but where turned off by Johnson.  I know many others that work within the Republican Party that didn't vote for Johnson because of Weld who was more of a Clinton surrogate then a Libertarian candidate for VP.

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32 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

There is a quickly growing part of the Republican Party, especially among younger voters, that leans Libertarian but where turned off by Johnson.  I know many others that work within the Republican Party that didn't vote for Johnson because of Weld who was more of a Clinton surrogate then a Libertarian candidate for VP.

Well, Libertarian thought is still such a minority (and I believe will remain so), that Johnson/Weld was the best ticket to inflate the numbers. A puritan Libertarian is just going to drive away any possible converts. I actually respect the Johnson/Weld ticket.

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

Well, Libertarian thought is still such a minority (and I believe will remain so), that Johnson/Weld was the best ticket to inflate the numbers. A puritan Libertarian is just going to drive away any possible converts. I actually respect the Johnson/Weld ticket.

Except for the many in the Republican Party who where looking for an alternative but couldn't vote for a Johnson/Weld ticket.

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20 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

Except for the many in the Republican Party who where looking for an alternative but couldn't vote for a Johnson/Weld ticket.

They aren't going to win 270 EVs without getting some people that aren't fiscal extremists, as most puritan Libertarians are. All parties have to allow give and take a move towards the center to reach moderates, who are more likely to remain undecided in a general election. The Green Party will have to do the same. 

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On ‎11‎/‎13‎/‎2016 at 6:58 PM, vcczar said:

They aren't going to win 270 EVs without getting some people that aren't fiscal extremists, as most puritan Libertarians are. All parties have to allow give and take a move towards the center to reach moderates, who are more likely to remain undecided in a general election. The Green Party will have to do the same. 

But, they will not get to 270 without convincing Republican-leaning people to join them.

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2 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

But, they will not get to 270 without convincing Republican-leaning people to join them.

That shouldn't be a problem since they are already Republican-leaning. They're a much more fiscally conservative option to Democrats and Republicans, as they stand. Their more socially moderate than some conservative Republicans, however. I think if the Libertarians can drain enough centrists, and moderate Democrats wanting change over economic policy, then the more conservative Republicans will join them. That won't be an option with a Purist Libertarian, who is unlikely to get any Democrats (unless they're one-issue anti-establishment voters) or likely to get centrists, moderate Republicans, and probably not even mainstream Republicans. 

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On November 13, 2016 at 4:58 PM, vcczar said:

They aren't going to win 270 EVs without getting some people that aren't fiscal extremists, as most puritan Libertarians are. All parties have to allow give and take a move towards the center to reach moderates, who are more likely to remain undecided in a general election. The Green Party will have to do the same.


 

2 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

But, they will not get to 270 without convincing Republican-leaning people to join them.

Frankly, as it is, I don't see the Libertarian party getting to 270 at all in the foreseeable future...

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1 hour ago, Patine said:


 

Frankly, as it is, I don't see the Libertarian party getting to 270 at all in the foreseeable future...

I agree. I don't think they will at any time in their history, since the key philosophies of the party aren't practical for most Americans. 

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On ‎11‎/‎15‎/‎2016 at 9:57 PM, vcczar said:

I agree. I don't think they will at any time in their history, since the key philosophies of the party aren't practical for most Americans. 

I also agree.  While I think they could increase there percentages by quite a bit, their policies conflict with Americans on both sides of the isle.  It will take some time for this to change, if at all.

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21 hours ago, jvikings1 said:

I also agree.  While I think they could increase there percentages by quite a bit, their policies conflict with Americans on both sides of the isle.  It will take some time for this to change, if at all.

I think the percentages will increase by abandoning or not focusing on the parts that are soundly unpopular to most Americans. There's definitely attractive parts in Libertarian philosophy, but there are also parts that are horrific, depending on your line of work, where you live and who you are. It would be interesting if someone wrote a book about four hypothetical Americas. Chapter 1: Progressive America. Chapter 2: Conservative America. Chapter 3: Libertarian America. Chapter 4: Socialist America. Each chapter would suppose that these forms of government dominate American politics on the local through federal levels, and in every branch of government. Each chapter would discuss the daily life, work, jobs, quality of life, cost of life for the average worker. Social and economic mobility. Crime, education, retirement, leisure, military, elections, freedoms, law, infrastructure, national power, science, health, the arts, entertainment, business, etc. 

 

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20 hours ago, vcczar said:

I think the percentages will increase by abandoning or not focusing on the parts that are soundly unpopular to most Americans. There's definitely attractive parts in Libertarian philosophy, but there are also parts that are horrific, depending on your line of work, where you live and who you are. It would be interesting if someone wrote a book about four hypothetical Americas. Chapter 1: Progressive America. Chapter 2: Conservative America. Chapter 3: Libertarian America. Chapter 4: Socialist America. Each chapter would suppose that these forms of government dominate American politics on the local through federal levels, and in every branch of government. Each chapter would discuss the daily life, work, jobs, quality of life, cost of life for the average worker. Social and economic mobility. Crime, education, retirement, leisure, military, elections, freedoms, law, infrastructure, national power, science, health, the arts, entertainment, business, etc. 

 

I agree that that could be one solution, but there will still most likely be conflict.

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