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Good book suggestion


vcczar

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I'm reading a book right now that is new to me. I's called Anti-Intellectualism in American Life by Richard Hofstadter. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1964. 

I'm probably going to use it a little in my update of the 1952 and 1956 PI scenarios, most likely in the bios, and perhaps for some events to add flavor. He mentions that Anti-Intellectualism was a term that was rarely heard until McCarthyism. 

His preface is almost a warning against Donald Trump, "Great men, great nations, have not been boasters and buffoons, but perceivers of the terror of life, and have manned themselves to face it."

I just bought this book, along with Henry Clay: The Essential American, today at the Texas Book Festival. I've read a lot about Henry Clay, but never a book specifically about him. In time when compromise is a dirty word, and gridlock, government shutdown and the like is making a mockery of our political system, it seems appropriate to read about the "Great Compromiser" 

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7 minutes ago, vcczar said:

I'm reading a book right now that is new to me. I's called Anti-Intellectualism in American Life by Richard Hofstadter. It won the Pulitzer Prize in 1964.

I'm probably going to use it a little in my update of the 1952 and 1956 PI scenarios, most likely in the bios, and perhaps for some events to add flavor. He mentions that Anti-Intellectualism was a term that was rarely heard until McCarthyism.

His preface is almost a warning against Donald Trump, "Great men, great nations, have not been boasters and buffoons, but perceivers of the terror of life, and have manned themselves to face it."

I just bought this book, along with Henry Clay: The Essential American, today at the Texas Book Festival. I've read a lot about Henry Clay, but never a book specifically about him. In time when compromise is a dirty word, and gridlock, government shutdown and the like is making a mockery of our political system, it seems appropriate to read about the "Great Compromiser" 

I had actually read Plato's "The Republic" earlier this year and was amazed at the book that gave it's name to a form of government claimed to be followed by (or at least used in the official name of) a vast majority of nation's today, held as an enlightened idea by, first Roman Republic, then the American and French Revolutionaries, and spreading onward and outward, and seen as a pinnacle of governmental achievement, actually seemed to deal with (in the original book itself) ends with a form of enlightened absolute monarchialism with "philosopher-kings" as he calls them with an impossible and highly unrealistic degree of wisdom, justice, and benevolence, but whom, nonetheless, are viewed as beyond question or reproach as most monarch of Antiquity or the Middle Ages were. I admit, I was quite shocked.

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@TheMiddlePolitical would like the Anti-Intellectualism in American Life, since it discusses La Follette as one of the many progressive fighters that made Intellectualism popular (along with Teddy Roosevelt) in the Progressive Age. 

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58 minutes ago, vcczar said:

@TheMiddlePolitical would like the Anti-Intellectualism in American Life, since it discusses La Follette as one of the many progressive fighters that made Intellectualism popular (along with Teddy Roosevelt) in the Progressive Age. 

I'm guessing I wouldn't :P

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16 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

I'm guessing I wouldn't :P

I think you'd like it if you read it. You might not agree with all of it. It's more of an analysis rather something attempting to be persuasive. It just explains the origins of intellectualism and anti-intellectualism in American Life. It starts with the current situation (1950s for him), and then it goes back to the early Colonial times and works its way back up to 1950s. 

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Just now, vcczar said:

I think you'd like it if you read it. You might not agree with all of it. It's more of an analysis rather something attempting to be persuasive. It just explains the origins of intellectualism and anti-intellectualism in American Life. It starts with the current situation (1950s for him), and then it goes back to the early Colonial times and works its way back up to 1950s. 

Hmm. I read a book detailing the Cold War and at the same time attempting to rip its legitimacy to shreds and that wasn't bad so I might enjoy it.

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15 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

Hmm. I read a book detailing the Cold War and at the same time attempting to rip its legitimacy to shreds and that wasn't bad so I might enjoy it.

You'd like Shield of Achilles by Phillip Bobbitt (LBJ's nephew). It argues that the wars from WWI to the end of the Cold War is really just one war attempting to establish a new constitutional order. 

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

@TheMiddlePolitical would like the Anti-Intellectualism in American Life, since it discusses La Follette as one of the many progressive fighters that made Intellectualism popular (along with Teddy Roosevelt) in the Progressive Age. 

Thanks for this! Ill check it out :) 

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