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All-Star Governorships


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In compiling my list of candidates for all-time Congressional elections, I've basically decided I think the all-time gubernatorial races are best done as 50 individual races, which obviously allows for primaries (though I still want primaries for C4E!). If anyone who knows a particular state's political culture well wants to take that state, I'd obviously appreciate the reduction in the workload. Other than that, what I need is maps of the 50 states, by counties or something else similar, lists of issues for each of the 50 states (though obviously many issues will be relatively constant across the several states), and candidate lists. Suggestions as to who is a viable candidate in each state, as well as where each candidate's strengths are in the primary or the general election, would of course be greatly appreciated. I'm starting to work on the candidate lists with the newest states first. Obviously most states have had dozens of governors from each party, so not all eligible candidates will be running. Candidates listed in roughly decreasing order of prominence/initial standing.

Alaska:

Democrats:

William Egan

Tony Knowles

Bill Sheffield

Steve Cowper

Republicans:

Jay Hammond

Sarah Palin

Sean Parnell

Keith Miller

Frank Murkowski - Running for All-Time Senate, off by default

Alaska Independence:

Wally Hickel

Hawaii:

Democrats:

George Ariyoshi

John Burns

Neil Abercrombie

John Waihee

Ben Cayetano

Republicans:

Linda Lingle

William Quinn

Arizona:

Democrats:

Bruce Babbit

George Hunt

Janet Napolitano

Ernest MacFarland

Republicans:

Paul Fannin

Thomas Campbell

Jack Williams?

Jan Brewer?

New Mexico:

Democrats:

Bruce King

Bill Richardson

John Dempsey

John Burroughs

Republicans:

Edwin Mechem

Gary Johnson

David Cargo

Octaviano Larrazolo

Susana Martinez?

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I'll do Delaware and Washington, the latter, because I'm somewhat familiar with the state (I've already done a Washington gubernatroial 2008 and Senatorial 2010 scenario), and Delaware, because I think it could be fun, and I'm a bit of a masochist. ;) After all, Delaware had seven seperate parties produce governors (Democratic, Republican, Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, Whig, and American/Know-Nothing), and I think I could get an eighth party out of the non-partisan 'presidents' and governors of Delaware who predated party politcs in that state and were instrumental in the early days after the Revolution (I was thinking of calling them the 'Revolutionary' or 'Foundation' Party or something like that; what do you think?).

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I strongly, strongly recommend doing Delaware by towns rather than counties (since there aren't many counties). My ideas for Delaware candidates, noting those that I have running for Congress or Senate in the All-Time Elections (and I don't know if you'll have a lot of Democrats in, since there are only about a dozen-plus of them). I'll let you do most of the development of the primary fields, except to say who I had put as the top nominee for each party when I was doing it that way, and also a few strong candidates that I have running elsewhere:

Democrats: Ruth Minner, because Tom Carper's my DE-1 nominee for Congress.

Republicans: Caleb Boggs, because Mike Castle's my DE-1 nominee for Congress.

Whigs: William Cooper (I tend to consider Whigs and National Republicans one party)

Democratic-Republicans: Joseph Haslet

Federalists: Joshua Clayton

Americans: Peter Causey, obviously, unopposed

"Colonials": Uncertain, 'cause I didn't make a Colonial party, but Nicholas Van Dyke is one of my Federalists for DE-SEN

As for the general election, with these candidates I had Clayton 37%, Boggs 29%, Minner 27%, Haslet 4%, Cooper 2%, Causey 1%.

Similarly, for Washington, I had:

Democrats: Gary Locke

Republicans: Daniel Evans

Populists: John Rogers (again, unopposed)

And for the general election, Locke 56%, Evans 41%, Rogers 3%. Obviously, those are just my ideas, but those were my ideas for these states.

I think I might try Rhode Island first, since that's where I am now. We have lots of parties, like the "Lincoln Chafee party" and the "Dorr Rebellion" party (and yes, Thomas Dorr as an independent is happening. Also the guy who opposed him as an independent.)

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I strongly, strongly recommend doing Delaware by towns rather than counties (since there aren't many counties). My ideas for Delaware candidates, noting those that I have running for Congress or Senate in the All-Time Elections (and I don't know if you'll have a lot of Democrats in, since there are only about a dozen-plus of them). I'll let you do most of the development of the primary fields, except to say who I had put as the top nominee for each party when I was doing it that way, and also a few strong candidates that I have running elsewhere:

Democrats: Ruth Minner, because Tom Carper's my DE-1 nominee for Congress.

Republicans: Caleb Boggs, because Mike Castle's my DE-1 nominee for Congress.

Whigs: William Cooper (I tend to consider Whigs and National Republicans one party)

Democratic-Republicans: Joseph Haslet

Federalists: Joshua Clayton

Americans: Peter Causey, obviously, unopposed

"Colonials": Uncertain, 'cause I didn't make a Colonial party, but Nicholas Van Dyke is one of my Federalists for DE-SEN

As for the general election, with these candidates I had Clayton 37%, Boggs 29%, Minner 27%, Haslet 4%, Cooper 2%, Causey 1%.

Similarly, for Washington, I had:

Democrats: Gary Locke

Republicans: Daniel Evans

Populists: John Rogers (again, unopposed)

And for the general election, Locke 56%, Evans 41%, Rogers 3%. Obviously, those are just my ideas, but those were my ideas for these states.

I think I might try Rhode Island first, since that's where I am now. We have lots of parties, like the "Lincoln Chafee party" and the "Dorr Rebellion" party (and yes, Thomas Dorr as an independent is happening. Also the guy who opposed him as an independent.)

I would say, with regards to the Delaware 'Colonials,' Thomas McKean as the likely frontrunner, but I could be persuaded otherwise. His status as having been a Governor of Pennsylvania as well could complicate things, though...

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It's slightly tedious, but what I'm doing for New York at least is taking historical census data on population for each county (available on Wikipedia) and totalling it up for each county, and then doing apportionment of EVs and such based on total historical population. (Use Excel or something similar if you want to do this, the alternative is too boring to contemplate...)

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In terms of issues, I think there are some that are going to show up in just about all states, including some of the most controversial issues through history and some of the main areas of traditional state power. Some federal issues I think are not really relevant at the state level, like tariffs or foreign policy, but I think things like immigration might have some relevance at a state level, right? Anyway, here's my idea of issues constant across the nation:

Civil Rights

Taxation

Education

Environment

Labor Laws

Family Law (incl. gay issues)

Public Morals (drugs & gambling, incl. Prohibition)

Corporate Laws

Welfare

Public Services

Public Works/Infrastructure

Gun Laws

Crime/Law & Order (incl. death penalty)

Electoral Law

I'm not sure whether I think it's better to have all of these issues the same across all the states, and just change the issue centers, or to have something be the center-right position on civil rights in Massachusetts but the center-left position on civil rights in Alabama. I think I favor the former approach, so I might post my ideas for issue positions as I develop them.

Things like Native Issues or something about cities might be important, but probably not in all states.

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In terms of issues, I think there are some that are going to show up in just about all states, including some of the most controversial issues through history and some of the main areas of traditional state power. Some federal issues I think are not really relevant at the state level, like tariffs or foreign policy, but I think things like immigration might have some relevance at a state level, right? Anyway, here's my idea of issues constant across the nation:

Civil Rights

Taxation

Education

Environment

Labor Laws

Family Law (incl. gay issues)

Public Morals (drugs & gambling, incl. Prohibition)

Corporate Laws

Welfare

Public Services

Public Works/Infrastructure

Gun Laws

Crime/Law & Order (incl. death penalty)

Electoral Law

I'm not sure whether I think it's better to have all of these issues the same across all the states, and just change the issue centers, or to have something be the center-right position on civil rights in Massachusetts but the center-left position on civil rights in Alabama. I think I favor the former approach, so I might post my ideas for issue positions as I develop them.

Things like Native Issues or something about cities might be important, but probably not in all states.

As for my doing of Washington, Native Issues would certainly be an issue there, less so Civil Rights or Electoral Law (the only real victims of civil rights abuses or disenfranchisement their significantly and institutionally were, again, Natives and, to some degree, Asians, as women had the vote there less than 10 years into statehood, and Blacks always had the vote there and never really the hard times they saw in the South). Delaware, of course, is a completely different story...

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In a Republican primary in New York between Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Dewey, Nelson Rockefeller, George Pataki, Charles Evans Hughes, and Levi Morton, assuming that the top 4 would be strongest with Roosevelt a pretty serious favorite, who would win what? Dewey, Rockefeller, Hughes and Morton are all basically from Manhattan, Roosevelt's from Long Island, and Pataki's from Westchester. So who wins upstate?

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I'd say Roosevelt would have the most rural appeal with his image as an adventurer and outdoorsman. As for upstate cities like Albany, Syracuse, and Buffalo, that is a good question there. Maybe check which of those candidates drew out the bigger % of GOP voter turnout in each upstate city. It's somewhat flimsy, but I'm at a loss for anything else...

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So, I would assume George Clinton is the forerunner for the Democratic-Republicans, John Jay for the Federalists, and Franklin Roosevelt for the Democrats, with Mario Cuomo, Grover Cleveland, and Martin Van Buren offering him some stiff opposition (correct me please if I'm wrong). Who then will be the frontrunner for the three or four Whig governors?

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Well, of the Whig governors, I think that all of them except Myron Clark are currently in my All-Time Congressional election for various positions, so they'll be in the game but off by default. Obviously if they're all "off", then Myron Clark it is. If they're all on, I think Hamilton Fish is the leader, maybe with a narrow lead over Seward (who was obviously a pretty Big Effing Deal later in history). And yeah, it's FDR for the Democrats ahead of Cleveland, Van Buren, Al Smith, Mario Cuomo, Hugh Carey, and (in distant last place) Horatio Seymour. He did kind of run for President once.

Also, I'm putting DeWitt Clinton in as an off-by-default Federalist (off because he's in as one of my Federalist Senate candidates). He's nominally a D-R as governor, but we know he was basically a Federalist and by the time he was governor it was already Era of Good Feelings so his having called himself a D-R didn't really tell us much. I feel like he'd be the favorite over Jay if he's on, though. Otherwise I'd need to have him be running somewhat behind George Clinton, and I feel like it's more interesting to have the two of them in different parties.

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Manhattan, and probably the rest of New York. I almost think I should have two Tammany endorsers, one to pick a candidate in the primary and one to boost Democrats in the general. Maybe one of them is Tammany itself and one of them is Boss Tweed, or something.

Also, anyone know a good way to find prominent newspapers from each NY county? Obviously the, uh, New York Times is a "national" endorser throughout the state...

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