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Soviet Union 2005


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The Communist Party of Soviet Union has been in power for nearly 100 years. But democratic reforms, fatigue with the Communist Party, a broken promise, factional infighting within the Party and a renewed and vigorous opposition makes the 2005 Election a crucial one in the nations history. Who will triumph in the factional struggles of the Communist Party? Will the Soviet Democrats end nearly 100 years of Communist rule?

Status: Complete

Acknowledgement: Some issues were influenced by the Kamchelska Scenario and the Map was taken from the President Forever 2005 Scenario. That being said this has a different thrust to both of them.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=HATA99ZR

Enjoy everyone :)

Critique and feedback actively encouraged!

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Yeah, I think you definitely did a good job on the issues and the map also is a definite plus. The scenario looks good too (which doesn't always equal a good scenario, but still is a nice extra).

The only serious 'problem' I have with the scenario is that I'd love to see some more candidates (Timochenko MUST have a primary challenger, or at the very least an alternative liberal candidate). Also I'm not too sure about Putin and Gorbachov being candidates.

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Yeah, I've tried having a primary challenger for Timonshenko, but in subsequent playtests it's always resulted in the Communists winning due to Timonshenko not having any time to consolidate her position. For the Sovet Democ to have any chance to win at all, they need to have the extra months of consolidation.

Have you played the scenario yet? Or did you just have a run through with the classic "Testparty"

Thanks for the feedback anyway :)

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A small note, the RSSR, by which I assume you meant the Russian Soviet Socialist Republic, was actually the RSFSR or Russian Soviet Federal Socialist Republic. Also here's a list of potential candidates you could use if you chose to in the primaries and the general election:

Communist Party

Nikolai Ryzhkov- Chairman of the Council of Ministers since 1985, Ryzhkov has always been seen as Gorbachev's right hand man. However in recent years Putin seems to have moved into the position of heir apparent, angering Ryzhkov and resulting in a breakdown of relations between himself and Gorbachev and, ultimately, in his decision to challenge his long time ally.

Boris Gromov- A former military general and Soviet hero, Gromov has served as the popular mayor of Moscow for the past decade and is the most prominent conservative-communist left in the party. He challenges Gorbachev and the others from an anti-reformist position.

Democratic Party

Boris Yelstin (off by default)- Yelstin has for years been one of the leading reformists and democrats in the Soviet Union and could likely take the Democratic nomination if he choses to run.

Alexander Rutskoy- A prominent reformist, Rutskoy served as the vice-presidential candidate to Yelstin in the 1995 USSR presidential election. Since then Ruskoy's star has continued to rise and many believe he could take the Democratic nominiation.

Bolshevik Party

Gennady Zyuganov- The leader of the communist splinter Bolshevik Party, a nationalistic, religious, Stalinist group, Zyuganov served as head of internal policy in the Communist Party from 1983-1990 and chief ideologue from 1990-1995. However his role in the communist party ended following his opposition to Gorbachev in the 1995 primaries and the following year Zyuganov formed the Bolshevik Party to oppose the, what he labeled, "pseudo-communism" of the moder CPSU.

Free Communist Party of the South

Nursultan Nazarbayev- The leader of another communist splinter party, the FCPS, Nazarbayev served as First Secretary of the Kazakh Communist Party from 1989-2001 and Chairman of the Supreme Soviet of the KSSR from 1991-2001. His ultimate departure grew out of his divide with Gorbachev over the future of the southern Soviet states, for which he favored independence and which Gorbachev had, thus far, failed to provide. Ultimately this lead to his formation of the separatist communist FCPS.

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