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United States 1796 BETA


tb75
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Here is my first completed scenario. It's an early beta so if there is any mistakes tell me.

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=DX5MD6UV

Whether I start in the primaries or the general election, every candidate's percentage is at 0%.

There are also a few spelling errors, although those are of secondary importance.

Aaron Burr's name is misspelled as a VP candidate and Pennsylvania is misspelled.

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Whether I start in the primaries or the general election, every candidate's percentage is at 0%.

There are also a few spelling errors, although those are of secondary importance.

Aaron Burr's name is misspelled as a VP candidate and Pennsylvania is misspelled.

Don't worry i will fix it. I was just happy to finish making it i didn't take to time to go over it. Like I said this real early beta

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I think is a good start for a scenario I've been expecting. Fix the percentages and the spelling and we have a solid one.

Just two suggestions:

1 - A closer map

2 - More candidates: George Clinton in the Democratic-Republican side and Alexander Hamilton as a Federalist, but off by default

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This looks like a neat one! I'm almost finished a 1789 one myself, I did on a whim, done strictly as a primary, with the convention being the 'election' (with the parrallel Vermont Republic gubernatorial election being the other 'party,' just to make it work), and, because Washington has such a huge advantage, each state has twice as many delegates as historic electors, and the second delegate-getter becomes VP, which is also a level of victory. I'll release it shortly so you can see how it plays out.

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Did you included the Anti-Federalist Electors? They got 3,000 votes in 1789.

Both Anti-Federalist candidates who got electors are full candidates, though most are Federalist. They and Washington are included in a United States Party that runs a primary (election) parallel to a sideshow Vermont Republic primary (election). Each US candidate has their party affiliation detailed in their bio.

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Alexander Hamilton was constitutionally ineligible to be President. I guess you could make that a mini-alternate history, have the Constitution be slightly different. Honestly, were he eligible, he'd've been the Federalist candidate in 1796 and, barring Aaron Burr's murdering him, he probably would've propelled the Federalists to continue as at least a viable party for much longer than they did.

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Alexander Hamilton was constitutionally ineligible to be President. I guess you could make that a mini-alternate history, have the Constitution be slightly different. Honestly, were he eligible, he'd've been the Federalist candidate in 1796 and, barring Aaron Burr's murdering him, he probably would've propelled the Federalists to continue as at least a viable party for much longer than they did.

Yes, I sugested as a alternate history piece, due to the fact that he would be THE federalist candidate.

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  • 1 month later...

tb75, if you'd like, I can finish off this scenario for you while I'm engaged in early elections, including adding a better, more focused map. If you're still up to completing it, that's great, too; I'll look forward to it and still send you the map, if you'd like.

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Here are some popular vote totals to help you out.

Adams 35,726 53.4%

Jefferson 31,115 46.6%

Only 9 of 16 states used the popular vote. I can't seem to find which ones at the moment, but I will post again if and when I find out. I know South Carolina did not use the popular vote.

There were also 4 states with split electoral votes.

Pennsylvania gave 1 to Adams and 14 to Jefferson.

Maryland was split 7-4 in favor of Adams even though it had only 10 electors. One elector voted for a Jefferson-Adams ticket.

Virginia went 20-1 for Jefferson.

North Carolina went 11-1 for Jefferson.

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I found a list of which states tabulated the popular vote.

http://www.presidentelect.org/e1796.html

There appear to be three categories. Some states chose electors by the state legislature. Some chose electors based on the popular vote at-large in the state (same as we do now). Some states chose electors based on the popular vote in each district (like Maine and Nebraska today). Some states mixed different systems.

The 9 states that recorded the popular vote were as follows:

Georgia

Kentucky

Maryland

Massachusetts

New Hampshire

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

Tennessee

Virginia

Hope this helps.

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  • 8 months later...

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