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While Forgotten Moderate and I come up with the Gore 2004 scenario, I thought I'd give everyone a little bit of a hint of what else I'm working on, which is a look into the future of politics.

The scenario I want to do will be set in 2020, after President Obama's two-terms and his Vice President's singular term. In this scenario, Obama's Vice President (whom ever it might have been), is rather old and has decided against a second term, even in the midst of mounting popularity. As such, both the Democrats and the Republicans are in need of candidates, as many of the parties' standard-bearers are getting a tad too old to keep going (Mitt Romney ran against Obama in 2012 and was crushed in a landslide, and Mike Huckabee was defeated by Obama's Vice President in 2016).

The Republicans have a chance to make a comeback for the first time since their landslide defeat in 2008, but will they be able to do so, or will an up and coming Democrat keep the Democrats in the White House?

The election itself will be pretty open. Some of this years' swing states will now be in Democratic or Republican columns (most likely Democratic, based on current trends), such as Virginia and Colorado being now reliably Democratic, while states like Florida will be reliably Republican. New swing states will include the upper South (Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia; as Virginia and North Carolina are reliably Democratic, along with Missouri), Arkansas, Louisiana, and many western states like Nebraska and Kansas.

As for the candidates, I was hoping for some help for those of both parties that are Rising Stats and could be viable candidates in 2020.

DEMOCRATS:

Patrick Murphy, Senator from Pennsylvania (Currently a U.S. Representative)

Scott Kleeb, Senator from Nebraska (Currently a candidate for U.S. Senate)

Chet Culver, Senator and former Governor of Iowa (Currently Governor of Iowa)

Tim Kaine, former Governor of Virginia (Currently Governor of Virginia)

Andrew Cuomo, former Governor of New York (Currently Attorney General of New York)

Ben Chandler, Governor of Kentucky (Currently a U.S. Representative)

Rick Noriega, Senator from Texas (Currently a Texas State Representative and candidate for U.S. Senate)

Harold Ford, Senator from Tennessee (Formerly a U.S. Representative)

Patrick J. Kennedy, Senator from Rhode Island (Currently a U.S. Representative)

Deval Patrick, Senator and former Governor of Massachusetts (Currently Governor of Massachusetts)

REPUBLICANS:

Sarah Palin, 2016 Republican Vice Presidential Nominee, Senator, and Former Governor from Alaska (Currently Governor of Alaska)

Bobby Jindal, Senator and former Governor of Lousiana (Currently Governor of Louisiana)

That's what I have so far. I'm looking for Republicans and more Democrats who would fit this mold of 'Rising Stars' in their respective parties, so help me out a bit with this, will ya? :D

Also, I need some help coming up with issues for 2020. I assume the standard ones will be up (Abortion, Gun Control, etc.), but we'll need some new ones as well. By this time, I'm sure Climate Change will probably be a very important issue as well, but I digress, issues of any form will be nice.

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While Forgotten Moderate and I come up with the Gore 2004 scenario, I thought I'd give everyone a little bit of a hint of what else I'm working on, which is a look into the future of politics.

The scenario I want to do will be set in 2020, after President Obama's two-terms and his Vice President's singular term. In this scenario, Obama's Vice President (whom ever it might have been), is rather old and has decided against a second term, even in the midst of mounting popularity. As such, both the Democrats and the Republicans are in need of candidates, as many of the parties' standard-bearers are getting a tad too old to keep going (Mitt Romney ran against Obama in 2012 and was crushed in a landslide, and Mike Huckabee was defeated by Obama's Vice President in 2016).

The Republicans have a chance to make a comeback for the first time since their landslide defeat in 2008, but will they be able to do so, or will an up and coming Democrat keep the Democrats in the White House?

The election itself will be pretty open. Some of this years' swing states will now be in Democratic or Republican columns (most likely Democratic, based on current trends), such as Virginia and Colorado being now reliably Democratic, while states like Florida will be reliably Republican. New swing states will include the upper South (Kentucky, Tennessee, West Virginia; as Virginia and North Carolina are reliably Democratic, along with Missouri), Arkansas, Louisiana, and many western states like Nebraska and Kansas.

As for the candidates, I was hoping for some help for those of both parties that are Rising Stats and could be viable candidates in 2020.

DEMOCRATS:

Patrick Murphy, Senator from Pennsylvania (Currently a U.S. Representative)

Scott Kleeb, Senator from Nebraska (Currently a candidate for U.S. Senate)

Chet Culver, Senator and former Governor of Iowa (Currently Governor of Iowa)

Tim Kaine, former Governor of Virginia (Currently Governor of Virginia)

Andrew Cuomo, former Governor of New York (Currently Attorney General of New York)

Ben Chandler, Governor of Kentucky (Currently a U.S. Representative)

Rick Noriega, Senator from Texas (Currently a Texas State Representative and candidate for U.S. Senate)

Harold Ford, Senator from Tennessee (Formerly a U.S. Representative)

Patrick J. Kennedy, Senator from Rhode Island (Currently a U.S. Representative)

REPUBLICANS:

Sarah Palin, 2016 Republican Vice Presidential Nominee, Senator, and Former Governor from Alaska (Currently Governor of Alaska)

Charlie Crist, former Governor of Florida (Currently Governor of Florida)

Bobby Jindal, Senator and former Governor of Lousiana (Currently Governor of Louisiana)

Mark Sanford, former Governor of South Carolina (Currently Governor of South Carolina)

That's what I have so far. I'm looking for Republicans and more Democrats who would fit this mold of 'Rising Stars' in their respective parties, so help me out a bit with this, will ya? :D

Also, I need some help coming up with issues for 2020. I assume the standard ones will be up (Abortion, Gun Control, etc.), but we'll need some new ones as well. By this time, I'm sure Climate Change will probably be a very important issue as well, but I digress, issues of any form will be nice.

jodi rell-ct-republican-current gov.

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Wouldn't she be far too old in 2020?

Also, I added Deval Patrick to the Democratic list, and I'm thinking about adding Caroline Kennedy as a Senator from New York (as if she was able to take Hillary's seat in 2012 and then go on to serve in the Senate).

sorry i forgot about that love the caroline kennnedy

wut about maria shriver as a senator

sorry i forgot about that love the caroline kennnedy

wut about maria shriver as a senator

chris murphy dem ct (current rep considering run for u.s. senate in 2010)

sorry i forgot about that love the caroline kennnedy

wut about maria shriver as a senator

chris murphy dem ct (current rep considering run for u.s. senate in 2010)

John Sununu- rep -current us senator form new hampshire

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I would advise you that this isn't adding up to be a very competitive scenario. By your numbers, the Dems have 300 electoral seats, with a 120 vote lead over the Republicans, without winning a single swing state!

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Democrats

Senator Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (currently U.S. representative for South Dakota)

Former Secretary of the Treasury Jeffery Sachs (currently a professor at Columbia University)

Gov. Jim Webb (currently US Senator for Virginia)

Republicans

Gov. Patrick McHenry (currently U.S. representative for North Carolina)

Gov. Adam Putnam (currently U.S. representative for Florida)

Senator John Cornyn (currently US Senator for Texas)

Issues-

Saudi Arabia- Secretary Sachs' economic policies not only cut global poverty by a quarter but they also drastically reduced the price of oil. Without black gold to buoy their economy the House of Saud has fallen and a radical Islamic government seems poised to take over. Positions range from send UN Ambassador Clinton to negotiate peaceful settlement to invasion.

Oil Exports- Thanks to a vigorous exploration of alternative fuels America no longer needs all the oil its been hording in the SPR. Or says the Democratic President. She wants to sell the oil the SPR to pay for more government programs, like student loans and more Peace Corps volunteers. The Republican controlled Senate is prepared to filibuster. Positions range from sell sell sell to buy buy buy

Living Wage (this is one of Obama's stated policy positions)- positions range from increase the federal living wage to abolish it.

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GOP

Paul Ryan (senator-WI, current congressman)

Scott Walker (gov-WI, current Milwaukee county exec)

Going along with what seems to be the tenor of this scenario, one issue could be what we will do with our massive budget surpluses now that President Obama has taught us how to poop gold.

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Some issues that will arise with an Obama presidency

Israel invaded

Iran gets nukes

Borderline communism

Huge debt

High Taxes

Massive immigration

High unemployment tied to the previous issue

Genocide in Iraq

Racial tensions

Ignoring of Chinas rise to supower status

High inflation

Second amendment infringement

Mass abortions

People marring animals and children

A failed healthcare plan

A failed education plan

Oil shortage

Business' failing due to unfair enviromental standards

No enviromental improvement

No alternate energy sources

Sounds fun huh?

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Wow. So many right-wing delusions, so little time.

Israel invaded

Putting aside U.S. policies for a moment, what on Earth would make people think that Israel would allow that to happen? Just about any military attack on them would be disastrous for the attacker. If you're talking terrorism in Israel, what else is new?

Iran gets nukes

Seems they're doing a good enough job of that on Bush's watch.

Borderline communism

As opposed to the police state that the Bush administration has us heading toward?

Huge debt

Largely run up during the Bush years.

High Taxes

Compared to? Certainly not the rest of the world.

Massive immigration

High unemployment tied to the previous issue

Gee, in a nation of immigrants...

Yet, you're doubtlessly talking about the illegal immigration that a Republican Congress and White House failed to do anything about when they had the chance.

Genocide in Iraq

... which is likely to happen regardless of whether we're there or not.

Racial tensions

... as if those are anything new.

Ignoring of Chinas rise to supower status

Highly unlikely. China wouldn't allow it.

High inflation

Already headed that direction ... on Bush's watch.

Second amendment infringement

Yeah, pesky things like making it difficult to buy a machine gun or a grenade launcher. Never mind the Bush administration's infringements on most of the rest of the Bill of Rights.

Mass abortions

As opposed to the return to dangerous back-alley abortions that will result from abortion becoming illegal again?

People marring animals and children

This item is something that nobody will ever be taken seriously for suggesting.

A failed healthcare plan

As opposed to a failed health-care system that we have now?

A failed education plan

How many school systems are there that already have or are ready to opt out of NCLB? There's your failed education plan.

Oil shortage

That's why it's called a non-renewable resource. The country doesn't need to end its dependence on foreign oil; it needs to end its dependence on oil. Period.

Business' failing due to unfair enviromental standards

Yeah! Those no-good people wanting their children and grandchildren to be able to breathe are causing businesses to lose money!

No enviromental improvement

No alternate energy sources

Your proof that these won't happen? Or that it would only happen due to an Obama presidency?

Sorry. I know this is a developmental thread, but people posting (mostly, if not entirely, outrageous) suppositions like these as fact drive me nuts.

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In case none of you have noticed most of the recent scenarios are so outragousley pro-democrat that they are not worth playing. First off you have this scenario which says Obama wins by a landslide in 2008, fat chance, look at the poll averages I quoted in a previous post.

Sorry, but there is no evidence that the dems will win by a landslide this year.

Real Clear Politics poll averages:

General Election: McCain vs. Obama

Obama: 46.6% McCain: 44.3%

General Election: McCain vs. Clinton

Clinton: 45.9% McCain: 44.9%

Then there is the Gore scenario which makes it seem like everything would have been perfect under Gore. Obviously everything wasn't perfect under Bush and there has NEVER been a president who was gotten everything right.

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Abe Lincoln, please read the posts in my scenario thread. It is not a Gore lovefest. It simply presumes that 9/11 did not happen, and that Gore increased domestic spending and pushed for Fair Trade. The economy is slightly better, but the majority of things are the same as they are now. However this scenario does seem like a Dem lovefest. Once I'm done with Gore in '04, I'm gonna make a 2008 Scenario post-Gore.

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I've got to agree with you. Sadly, this is a good idea, but given the obnoxious tone of this and the Gore 04 premises, I don't think I'd spend the bandwidth.

Here's a more likely possibility for bridging to 2016. Keep in mind that I'm a Republican, but I would venture that my idea (stipulating 2 Obama terms and a 1-term successor) is nowhere near as absurd as the "it's a blue blue world" premise. The Gore 04 writeup is too ridiculous to attempt to fix, so I'll just do this one. I'll even update the elections for my home state as I go, just for shiggles.

'08 - Obama beats McCain with 285-300 EVs, 50-46 in the popular vote. Dems make gains in congress. Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle becomes Attorney General.

'10 - Mild GOP gains in congress. President Obama's popularity holds, but galvanized opposition by congressional Republicans stymies most of his major initiatives. The US maintains a base in Iraq, but all peacekeeping is handled by Iraqi forces. Both sides claim credit for this. In WI, Scott Walker comfortably defeats Governor Barbara Lawton and Senator Russ Feingold is re-elected over the useless J.B. Van Hollen.

'12 - President O is re-elected by a comfortable margin. Congressional elections are a wash. Governor Mike Huckabee is the GOP nominee, edging Mitt Romney in a bitter primary fight, but fails to click with the grassroots fiscal conservatism that helped in the midterms. The South and West stay red, but O beats Huckleberry with room to spare. In Wisconsin, Congressman Paul Ryan, fast becoming a darling of fiscal conservatives, is elected to the seat of the retiring Senator Herb Kohl over Congresswoman Gwen Moore.

'14 - Big GOP gains in congress, narrowly taking one house, let's say the Senate. The split congress leads to two years of nothing really happening in Washington, which leads to big-time economic growth. Overseas, things are unsettled, with North Korea acting up and continuing tension between India and Pakistan. Governor Walker is re-elected, carrying all but Dane County.

'16 - Anonymous Veep is narrowly elected 48%-46%. It is touch-and-go until the end, but President O's continuing popularity wins through. In the end, Obama's legacy is much the same as Clinton's, popular, but not terribly consequential. A divided congress continues, with the Dems closing the gap in the Senate. Senator Feingold is re-elected handily.

'18 - The bottom drops out on Anonymous Veep. The US is finally spurred into action in Darfur after China's continuing obstruction in the UN. When things on the ground look to be ugly, Anonymous Veep cuts an off-the-cuff remark criticizing Obama for inaction. Obama replies by burying Anonymous Veep in his memoirs. Additionally, 8 years of being the administration's hatchet man have burned some bridges. The GOP makes big gains in congress, taking the House and adding a seat in the Senate. Shortly after the midterms, Anonymous Veep announces that he will not seek, nor will he accept, his party's nomination for another term as President. Anonymous Veep's Anonymous Veep considers a run, then decides against it shortly before the Primary season begins. Most Democratic candidates, however, have distanced themselves from the Administration, leaving them on clean footing. In Wisconsin, Ryan and Walker are both re-elected. And the Packers win again.

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This is a scenario development thread, not a policy debate. Constructive criticism is welcome but please air your personal political views elsewhere.

Please note that the end of my post, reposted below, was an acknowledgement of that fact.

Sorry. I know this is a developmental thread, but people posting (mostly, if not entirely, outrageous) suppositions like these as fact drive me nuts.

Also note that the quoted text was posted a good 3 hours before your comment.

That post was in response to another person (whose username makes his political allegiance crystal clear) airing his personal political views as if they were fact. I chose not to let that post stand unchallenged.

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It was far more than that. It was framing the very idea of an Obama presidency as an absolute nightmare.

Noting a few possible problems is one thing. It's quite another to post a largely partisan laundry list.

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Please note that the end of my post, reposted below, was an acknowledgement of that fact.

Your acknowledgment of a wrong does not absolve you of that wrong.

Merely pointing out what you perceive as an ultra-partisan scenario does not assist in the development of that scenario. OK, it's an Obama-love fest, it's a GOP-hate fest. If you want to make the scenario better than submit some ideas rather than just attacking them.

In defense of my suggestions I would mention that if you stopped 100 people in the street when Reagan was elected in 1980 and told them that in 12 years there was going to be a peaceful resolution to the Cold War how many of them do you think would have believed you? Things like cutting global poverty by a quarter (especially if you read Sachs' book) or developing alternative fuel sources (we went from satellites built with duct tape to putting a man on the moon in less than a decade) are as not as far-fetched as you might think.

Is it going to be a utopia? No, but there is an argument to be made, especially since it seems extremely possible we're going to see a Democratic Congress with a Democratic White House for the first time in 16 years that a good deal of the Democrat's policy will put into place. Does that mean it's going to work? No. I'm just trying to come up with some issues that I believe will be put on the table by the Democrats by 2020, I see alternative fuels as one of them, I'm not saying I agree, I'm not saying the policies will work.

I don't really see Darfur being an issue in 2020. If no one has taken action by now I can't imagine they'll have taken action in a decade. I mean look at the DRC, 3 million dead in 10 years and nothing. I imagine Iraq will still be an issue in some capacity but it's hard to say how.

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Merely pointing out what you perceive as an ultra-partisan scenario does not assist in the development of that scenario. OK, it's an Obama-love fest, it's a GOP-hate fest. If you want to make the scenario better than submit some ideas rather than just attacking them.

The only thing I was attacking was the idea that VoteGOP's partisan laundry list was the likely result of an Obama presidency.

Is it going to be a utopia? No, but there is an argument to be made, especially since it seems extremely possible we're going to see a Democratic Congress with a Democratic White House for the first time in 16 years that a good deal of the Democrat's policy will put into place.

Agreed.

Does that mean it's going to work? No.

Also agreed. Might work ... might not.

Want something constructive, do you?

Possibilities for 2020:

  • Social Security: taken off-budget? (the famous "lockbox")
  • Decreased (and possibly no) presence in Iraq
  • Encouragement of renewable energies and environmentally friendly technologies
  • Probable increase in CAFE standards
  • Substantial changes to (if not all-out repeal of) things like NCLB and the "Patriot Act"

Questions for 2020:

  • How has China been handled? What balance of confrontation vs. diplomacy? (Given China's need to "save face," it's likely that too much confrontation would not work well. We're also not going to roll over for them.)
  • Could environmentally friendly technologies could become a growth industry by this point?
  • Since bin Laden's likely dead (in 12 years, natural causes if nothing else), has anyone "credible" (to terrorists) taken over for him?

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Taking into your concerns of the over-partisaness of my scenario (which it is, frankly, and should be a lot more realistic), I'm switching up some of the swing states to make them a lot more competitive for both parties, as par your suggestions.

Louisiana and Arkansas will remain in the red category, as will the Dakotas, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho. Florida will also be solidly in this category.

Missouri will remain purple, as well as New Hampshire, Nevada, Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa (All relatively neutral as it comes). New swing states will include Kansas and Nebraska (leaning Democratic) and New Jersey (leaning Republican).

New additions to the Democratic category will include Virginia, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada, and North Carolina.

Sample Issue Ideas:

Abortion

Balanced Budget

Business Tax

Chinese Threat (China, by this time, is a superpower...I'd say there'd be a similar relationship between the U.S. and China as there was between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.)

Education (Moving towards greater federal control, extending the school year, or opting for charter schools)

Environmental Economy (Subsidies for green companies to push for energy independence and less harmful emissions, or cutting funding/eliminating such subsidies)

European Union (Relations between a federal European Union and the United States)

Climate Change (How the problem should be addressed, or in some circles, even if it is a problem)

Gun Control (Possible move towards a nationwide handgun ban? Already in effect in many cities...)

Homeland Security

Inflation (caused by Bush's war on debit policies, much like Johnson's during Vietnam. I expect Inflation would hurt pretty bad around 2020.)

Personal Tax

Saudi Arabia

Same-Sex Marriage (I assume, since the public direction seems to be going in favor of homosexual rights, this would be favoring or opposing a national recognition of civil unions of gay marriages.)

Social Security

Unions

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Taking into your concerns of the over-partisaness of my scenario (which it is, frankly, and should be a lot more realistic), I'm switching up some of the swing states to make them a lot more competitive for both parties, as par your suggestions.

Louisiana and Arkansas will remain in the red category, as will the Dakotas, Wyoming, Utah, Idaho. Florida will also be solidly in this category.

Missouri will remain purple, as well as New Hampshire, Nevada, Arizona, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa (All relatively neutral as it comes). New swing states will include Kansas and Nebraska (leaning Democratic) and New Jersey (leaning Republican).

New additions to the Democratic category will include Virginia, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada, and North Carolina.

(Adding more...)

Better but Kansas and Nebraska? I really doubt they'll turn blue any time soon.

Mccain vs Obama Kansas poll has Mccain up by 22. Up 11 in Nebraska.

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Better but Kansas and Nebraska? I really doubt they'll turn blue any time soon.

Mccain vs Obama Kansas poll has Mccain up by 22. Up 11 in Nebraska.

I've gotta to agree with you on this. Being a Kansas citizen, I could not ever see Kansas being a "leaning Dem." State. Also to mention, Kansas hasn't voted for a democratic president since the Democratic Landslide in 1964 (LBJ vs. Goldwater). Plus, Kansas hasn't voted a Democrat to the U.S. Senate since 1932 (which was in a special election due to the resignation of Charles Curtis who became Hoover's Vice President).

Different Subject: If your looking for Democratic Candidate, you could add KS Gov. Kathleen Sebelius. I'm expecting her to run for Senate in 2010 against Brownback's Republican Successor (He said he's not running again)

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