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lizphairphreak

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  1. what's the confusion here? theyve approved pfizer booster shots for people over a certain age or with certain medical conditions. president biden is over that age and apparently got pfizer, so he's getting a booster. and doing it televised the way that most leaders have handled getting vaccinated.
  2. Removed some of the more... outdated ones.
  3. Obviously there are a lot of caveats since our current landscape is less predictable (plus, you know, gerrymandering and voter suppression,) but I feel like DeSantis is peaking early. He's become so toxic to anyone outside of the GOP / Covid "truther" base and alienated enough people to be a hindrance eventually, even if it gives him an opportunity to puff his chest out now. Being a public enemy means he'll face far more scrutiny and have more eyes on him, especially with a re-election bid coming up. If he under-performs, or even loses, that would really knock him off his perch right before a primary cycle begins. Beyond just that, being the focus point now in 2021 means that there will be time for almost two full years before a primary cycle for him to misstep. Especially with his dependence on the base, he could say one even marginally negative thing about Trump and turn supporters against him. Anyway, I really think that when there's a large primary field with one central favorite (Trump,) you don't want to peak until right around time to vote. I think we saw a similar pattern in the 2020 Dem primary, to a lesser extent. Biden was the favorite, and whenever someone was polling high, eventually the news cycle would shift. Harris, Warren, Buttigieg, even Sanders to an extent, all had that. That's just my personal theory, though.
  4. Can editing the files create an actual RCV flow? That would be cool if I can pull it off..
  5. Considering the Ranked Choice NYC Mayoral election, I wonder how RCV could be incorporated into PI? I'm guessing it could be similar to how the conventions are processed?
  6. Eric Adams is hardly representative of the Democratic Party lol
  7. I played this 2024 scenario as AOC, starting with the primaries: http://campaigns.270soft.com/2020/10/25/2024-americas-crossroad/ For the GOP, I turned on Haley, Cotton, Cruz, Scott and DeSantis. Haley won pretty easily, with Cotton and Cruz both polling equal to her and falling back at different points. She ended up choosing Pence as VP. For the Democrats, I turned on Harris, AOC, Buttigieg, Klobuchar, Abrams, and Williamson. I had Gabbard, Booker, and Whitmer as Not Seeking and they all declined to run. Had some candidates for Greens and Libertarians, but forget who (sorry.) Harris was the clear frontrunner with AOC in second until Iowa, when Buttigieg surged to first and ended up winning almost every state but Nebraska (which went to Harris) and Vermont (which went to AOC.) As AOC, I came in third, and was able to negotiate a running mate position for Buttigieg in exchange for my delegates. He would've likely reached the threshold without AOC's delegates, but it would've taken until the end of the voting to do so. Buttigieg was polling far ahead of Haley for the entire GE, usually around 7% if not more, but the electoral college was very iffy and genuinely could've gone either way up until the end. Buttigieg triumphed in all three debates, and AOC easily beat Pence too. The campaign ended up focusing on Florida, Ohio, Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Carolina, Texas, and Indiana. In the end, this was the result: Despite the clear margin of victory in both the Popular Vote and Electoral College, Haley remained strong in NC, GA, IA, AZ, and OH until the end, even leading in FL and WI at a few points. And despite massive investment into TX, Haley ended up carrying the state by around 3 points; in IN, she won by around 4.5. All in all, I thought the GE portion of this was fairly realistic, other than Haley choosing Pence as a VP. The primaries were a different story: Abrams polled irrationally low, AOC led in random states (she was ahead in IA, NH, and NV at the beginning as well as UT and a few others,) and Kamala Harris got absolutely clobbered despite being VP by this point.
  8. Heya, 1. 25 2. Work at an LGBTQ nonprofit / also in media/comms 3. Undergrad in Political Science and a minor in Bioethics. would love to do more, but not there yet. 4. Lib Left 5. In honor of your Marianne Williamson propic, Aquarius
  9. NEED to know who the VPs were.
  10. I don't disagree. I grew up in the Boston area until I was 18, and I don't think of it as more racist than other cities I've been to / learned about, but it has its own brand of racism (hate using this phrase) that's not quite like anywhere else. Kind of like how Manhattan racism is different than Queens racism in NYC.
  11. Because Boston has had a pretty racist history, and so a non-white (and non-male) mayor would be a pretty big step for the city.
  12. I was thinking about this with this Atlantic article that came out today: https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/08/how-biden-loses/615835/ There are so many people who completely agree with the protests, are sick and tired of not being heard by politicians, and have seen "peaceful" protests fail (and still be painted as violent affairs) that they're desensitized to fires and violence. Obviously Biden can't endorse violent riots for many reasons, but any advice telling him or Harris or other people to turn their back on this large group of protesters and supporters of protesters is a great way to lose the progressive base.
  13. I agree with the take that Jill Biden's speech was better than Kasich's, but I understand the inclusion of his here. I will say the one major notable absence for me was Brayden, the 13 year old who bravely talked about his stutter. That moment did more to make Biden sympathetic for those neutral/against him than anything else, and nobody could watch and not feel something or at very least acknowledge the bravery.
  14. The only new discussion I brought in is that Intersex is now being used (by actual people who are Intersex) and that the term 'hermaphrodite,' at least for human identity, is outdated and often considered offensive. Your insistence on continuing to use it seems like a fixation to me. You're right about defining sex being an issue that is nebulous and hard to pin down... which is why it's strange to me that you're insisting on trying to draw out this discussion and, in turn, minimizing certain biological characteristics and occurrences because they don't match your point that seeks to uphold sex as binary. I'd recommend talking with people who are Intersex and learning about Intersex organizations, since it's always better to learn from people who share an identity than not (and, personally, I am not Intersex myself.) The correlation I was drawing is that dominant social groups (in our case, cisgender white men with money) often go to describing members of marginalized groups as being sexually violent (ie, Black men will sexually abuse white women, refugees and immigrants from Latin American and Muslim countries will invade and beat and rape women, ...transgender women will go into bathrooms to assault little girls.) Do you see how these are similar arguments that target marginalized identities? And none of them necessarily are coming from "we hate ___" but rather from "we need to feel safe and _____ people challenge that safety." And, again, these arguments stick and they color how people view marginalized groups, despite being baseless. If I was unclear about the correlation I was drawing, my apologies. Unfortunately, for people who are marginalized, the impacts of negative beliefs that stem from innocence are the same as if they were to stem from outright antagonism and hatred.
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