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Chancellor Forever Scenario Designer Notes

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Chancellor Forever Scenario Designer Notes

In each party file, you can add the following:

@free_ad_credits

@ad_type

Regional

@num_credits

15

@end_ad_type

@end_free_ad_credits

You can add ad credits for multiple ad types, for example,

@free_ad_credits

@ad_type

Regional

@num_credits

15

@end_ad_type

@ad_type

National

@num_credits

15

@end_ad_type

@end_free_ad_credits

The following are additional comments taken from one of the source files.

// a credit is certain amount of population can reach, where 1 is the entire population (so, all regions) for one turn

// so, 10 would mean the player could use free credits for the entire country for up to 10 turns

// can use decimal point

// 0 and up

-----

In each candidate file, you can add the following:

@regional_bonuses

@end regional_bonuses

In between the @regional_bonuses and @end regional_bonuses, you can add the region name, followed on the next line by the bonus. For example,

@regional_bonuses

Bayern

5

@end regional_bonuses

You can add multiple regions. For example,

@regional_bonuses

Bayern

5

Berlin

-5

@end regional_bonuses

The following are additional comments taken from one of the source files.

// if you don't want the standard home region bonus (and nothing else) to be applied to this candidate, or want

// to specify any regions where the candidate has a change in percentages from the party percentages, include

// a regional_bonuses section here, at the end of the candidate's file

// Note: if a regional_bonuses section is included, no automatic home region bonus will be applied, only the

// regional bonuses specified here

// list any region where the candidate gets a plus or minus in percentage, and then the change in percentage

// for example,

// Bayern

// 5

// you could then add another region if you wanted,

// Berlin

// -5

// and so on

// you can also have no regions listed between the @regional_bonuses @end regional_bonuses lines, which means the

// candidate gets no change in percentages and no standard home region bonus

// Note: the candidate attributes and platform positions will still be compared to the default candidate listed in the

// party file, and percentages will be modified according to the program algorithm for that (and similarly, other

// party candidates will be compared to the default candidate attributes listed in their party files, which could

// also affect this candidate's percentages)

// Note: because starting percentages are made to sum to 100, actual changes to percentages will not be as large as

// specified here

// for example, if there are two parties, L and R, each with a starting percentage of 50% in region A,

// but the candidate for party L has a +50 from their @regional_bonuses section, what would happen is as follows

// party L 50 + 50, party R 50, so L = 100, R = 50, but this equals 150%, so the program will reduce these percentages

// until the new sum is 100%, by multiplying each value by 100/150 (in this case)

// so, the new percentages will be 66.7 and 33.3, not what might be expected by adding 50 percentage points to the initial

// 50!

// however, if the candidate for party R had a -50 from their @regional_bonuses section, what would happen is as follows

// party L 50 + 50, party R 50 - 50, so L = 100, R = 0, which equals 100%, so the program does not modify the percentages

// any further to make them sum to 100%

// in other words, use these bonuses with caution, there could be large percentage swings for some candidate by simply

// selecting a different opposing candidate

// these percentages can't be edited in the Candidate Editor

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In scenario.p4e, you can add the following:

@allow_coalition_offers

1

@end

A '1' signifies the option is enabled, a '0' that it is turned off.

-----

primary_secondary_conversion.p4e sets out how the Hare-Niemeyer primary to secondary vote conversion works.

-----

ad_types.p4e specifies the ad types.

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primary_secondary_conversion.p4e sets out how the Hare-Niemeyer primary to secondary vote conversion works.

Can you provide more details on how this part works? It's not clear which way round this acts and what the numbers completely reflect.

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Hi Alex,

Below is a sample primary_secondary_conversion.p4e file.

In Germany voters cast two votes - one for the FPP portion of the Hare-Niemeyer system called a primary vote (this is the vote for their local candidate), and another one which largely determines the composition of the Bundestag called the secondary vote (this is a vote for a party, not a particular candidate). (The secondary vote is actually the more important one, the name is misleading.)

The @parties ... @end parties section just lists the parties there are in the scenario, in the order they are listed in the scenario.p4e file.

After that, each party is listed, with (in this case) 5 numbers below it, one number for each party.

So, the

Social Democratic

90.9

3.5

3.3

0.7

1.1

section tells the computer that how much of the Social Democratic party's secondary vote goes to each party for the primary vote. As mentioned above, the primary vote is the FPP vote (in a Hare-Niemeyer scenario), the secondary vote is the other vote used by Hare-Niemeyer.

So, in the above example, if the Social Democratic party received (say) 35% of the secondary vote, they would receive 90.9% of that 35% for the primary vote. The other parties would receive 3.5%, 3.3%, 0.7%, and 1.1% of that 35% respectively for the primary vote.

The computer then looks at the next section.

CDU/CSU

2.5

94.6

0.8

1.4

0.2

This section tells the computer that, if the CDU/CSU received (say) 40% of the secondary vote, the Social Democratic party would receive 2.4% of that 40% for the primary vote, the CDU/CSU would receive 94.6% of that 40% for the primary vote, and so on.

The primary vote numbers are cumulative, so the Social Democratic party receives for the primary vote their amount from the first section, plus their amount from the second section, plus (and so on for all the sections in the file).

Does this help at all?

Sincerely,

Anthony Burgoyne

80soft.com

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// first, list parties that will be listed in conversion tables, in the order they will be listed

// this order should match how parties are listed in general

@parties

Social Democratic

CDU/CSU

Greens

Free Democratic

Left.PDS

//others

@end parties

// then list each party, and underneath list the percentage of the secondary vote that goes to each other party for the primary vote

// this list should also match the order of the parties listed above

// for example, if the CDU/CSU received 40% of the secondary vote, and their table was as follows

// CDU/CSU

// 2.5

// 94.6

// 0.8

// 1.4

// 0.2

//0.5

// the first line in the above simply means that this table is for conversion of, in this case, the CDU/CSU's secondary voters

// so, 2.5% if the CDU's secondary voters are primary voters for the SPD

// so, 94.6% of the CDU's secondary voters are also primary voters for the CDU,

// such that the CDU would receive 40% * 94.6% in primary votes from their own secondary voters

// and so on

Social Democratic

90.9

3.5

3.3

0.7

1.1

//0.5

CDU/CSU

2.5

94.6

0.8

1.4

0.2

//0.5

Greens

33.2

6.7

56.4

0.7

1.6

//1.4

Free Democratic

9.9

54.6

2.3

31.9

0.5

//0.8

Left.PDS

16.7

3.3

4.4

0.6

73.8

//1.2

//others

//21.6

//15.1

//1.6

//5.8

//4.1

//51.8

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How can I change the number of HN seats available in my election ? I want to minimize primary election seats and maximize the HN seats, although I'm stuck at around 40-43 HN seats to my 16 provinces (with 1 elector each)... Adjusting population doesn't work since it just takes the HN seats from the other provinces. Any ideas ???

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