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vcczar

How Lasting Coronavirus Could Help Trump

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Saw an interesting article about how closing colleges and universities could cost Democrats. Students are much more likely to vote Democrat. Registration and voting is usually pushed on campus. On-campus voting is very convenient for students. Absent this, youth turnout may decrease noticeably, unless mail-in voting exists. 

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That's an interesting point.  I recall a girl coming up me and asking me to register to vote within my first few weeks on campus.  She asked me which party I wanted to register with and I confessed to her that I didn't even know the difference -- that's how little I'd been paying attention up to that point.  She responded with something like "Well, the Democrats want us to do what we want, but the Republicans want to tell us what to do."  I was pretty sure that was a slanted take, so I registered Republican.  Didn't see the girl again. Ha.

I'd moved to a new state in between the 2008 and 2012 election, so when I had to re-register I changed to Democrat, and now I swap back and forth depending on which party's primary I feel most strongly needs me to weigh in (thank you for that flexibility, Ohio!)

But that was back in 2001 (just a week or two before 9/11), back before college kids were particularly internet savvy.  It would be another 4-5 years before I'd become particularly aware that google exists.  Now you can register to vote on Facebook.  

I don't doubt that in-person recruitment at colleges was successful, but I imagine this easily translates into something that can still be achieved remotely.

 

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31 minutes ago, Actinguy said:

That's an interesting point.  I recall a girl coming up me and asking me to register to vote within my first few weeks on campus.  She asked me which party I wanted to register with and I confessed to her that I didn't even know the difference -- that's how little I'd been paying attention up to that point.  She responded with something like "Well, the Democrats want us to do what we want, but the Republicans want to tell us what to do."  I was pretty sure that was a slanted take, so I registered Republican.  Didn't see the girl again. Ha.

I'd moved to a new state in between the 2008 and 2012 election, so when I had to re-register I changed to Democrat, and now I swap back and forth depending on which party's primary I feel most strongly needs me to weigh in (thank you for that flexibility, Ohio!)

But that was back in 2001 (just a week or two before 9/11), back before college kids were particularly internet savvy.  It would be another 4-5 years before I'd become particularly aware that google exists.  Now you can register to vote on Facebook.  

I don't doubt that in-person recruitment at colleges was successful, but I imagine this easily translates into something that can still be achieved remotely.

 

I think my dad registered me in 2000 TX. I don’t remember doing it. I voted Bush because he was from TX too and I was ignorant of the candidates.  In 2004, I voted for Kerry on campus In TX. Most convenient voting experience ever. 

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

I think my dad registered me in 2000 TX. I don’t remember doing it. I voted Bush because he was from TX too and I was ignorant of the candidates.  In 2004, I voted for Kerry on campus In TX. Most convenient voting experience ever. 

I've told the story before, but I was too young to vote in 2000, was in South Korea in 2004, and was in Iraq in 2008.  I certainly voted in midterms and local elections, but my first Presidential election actually voting was for Obama in 2012.  I also voted to legalize gay marriage in Maryland in that same election (which passed).  

It's wild to think that was just 8 years ago.

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20 minutes ago, Actinguy said:

I've told the story before, but I was too young to vote in 2000, was in South Korea in 2004, and was in Iraq in 2008.  I certainly voted in midterms and local elections, but my first Presidential election actually voting was for Obama in 2012.  I also voted to legalize gay marriage in Maryland in that same election (which passed).  

It's wild to think that was just 8 years ago.

Yeah, I know. It's odd how memory works. 2000 seems like ages ago to me; however, 2001 does not. I think 9/11 sort of just cleaved how my mind registered recent and distant memories. I can remember 9/11 and my life during that time like it was yesterday. 2004 election seems very recent to me (first election I really kept up with). 2008 and 2012 definitely seem recent. 2016 seems further away than it should, but that's because this presidency has just seemed to drag on forever. Total fatigue. 

I'm glad I've voted in every single presidential election. Sadly, I'm not as consistent voter in midterms. That's changed though. 

It's crazy to think how many elections my grandmother could have voted in. Not sure when/if she ever voted. She was born in 1900 and died in 2002. 102 years. She was really old when I was born. My dad was in his mid-40s when I was born. Anyway, I believe she could have voted in the first election that allowed women to vote. Assume that's the case, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000. That's 20 presidential elections! I'm about to have my 6th. Assuming I get to have 14 more, my final presidential election will be 2076! 

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7 minutes ago, vcczar said:

It's crazy to think how many elections my grandmother could have voted in. Not sure when/if she ever voted. She was born in 1900 and died in 2002. 102 years. She was really old when I was born. My dad was in his mid-40s when I was born. Anyway, I believe she could have voted in the first election that allowed women to vote. Assume that's the case, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000. That's 20 presidential elections! I'm about to have my 6th. Assuming I get to have 14 more, my final presidential election will be 2076! 

Very interesting.  My great grandmother lived to 104 -- born in 1914, just passed away in 2018.  

I'd thought about asking her whether she'd ever imagined that she would live long enough to see a black man voted as President.   But we'd never discussed matters of race before, so I was too worried about what a 95-year-old woman might have to say on the subject that I never asked.

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39 minutes ago, Actinguy said:

in South Korea in 2004, and was in Iraq in 2008.

Is US military personnel not permitted to vote when stationed overseas? Maybe you just had no time for it, but if it's prohibited it's very odd.

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3 minutes ago, Actinguy said:

Very interesting.  My great grandmother lived to 104 -- born in 1914, just passed away in 2018.  

I'd thought about asking her whether she'd ever imagined that she would live long enough to see a black man voted as President.   But we'd never discussed matters of race before, so I was too worried about what a 95-year-old woman might have to say on the subject that I never asked.

I rarely saw my grandmother after 1988. I saw her maybe twice in the 1990s. She was really quiet. I only have one vague memory of her saying anything. I was drinking RC Cola and she told me that it was poison or something like that. She wasn't trying to be funny. She believed in some theory that the aluminum cans were bad. Oh, I also remember her getting upset when my grandfather pushed a button on her recliner and it started automatically reclining on her. They both lived on a farm in a small rural town. 

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19 minutes ago, Conservative Elector 2 said:

Is US military personnel not permitted to vote when stationed overseas? Maybe you just had no time for it, but if it's prohibited it's very odd.

They’re allowed, but I got to Korea in October, just weeks before the election.  I think I’d missed the cut-off date to register for absentee voting.

Got to Iraq in July, so no excuses there.  I just didn’t get around to registering for an absentee ballot.

 

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1 hour ago, Actinguy said:

They’re allowed, but I got to Korea in October, just weeks before the election.  I think I’d missed the cut-off date to register for absentee voting.

Got to Iraq in July, so no excuses there.  I just didn’t get around to registering for an absentee ballot.

 

I see. 

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4 hours ago, vcczar said:

Saw an interesting article about how closing colleges and universities could cost Democrats. Students are much more likely to vote Democrat. Registration and voting is usually pushed on campus. On-campus voting is very convenient for students. Absent this, youth turnout may decrease noticeably, unless mail-in voting exists. 

I'm sure Dolard thought of that when he had the virus engineered.

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4 hours ago, Actinguy said:

That's an interesting point.  I recall a girl coming up me and asking me to register to vote within my first few weeks on campus.  She asked me which party I wanted to register with and I confessed to her that I didn't even know the difference -- that's how little I'd been paying attention up to that point.  She responded with something like "Well, the Democrats want us to do what we want, but the Republicans want to tell us what to do."  I was pretty sure that was a slanted take, so I registered Republican.  Didn't see the girl again. Ha.

I'd moved to a new state in between the 2008 and 2012 election, so when I had to re-register I changed to Democrat, and now I swap back and forth depending on which party's primary I feel most strongly needs me to weigh in (thank you for that flexibility, Ohio!)

But that was back in 2001 (just a week or two before 9/11), back before college kids were particularly internet savvy.  It would be another 4-5 years before I'd become particularly aware that google exists.  Now you can register to vote on Facebook.  

I don't doubt that in-person recruitment at colleges was successful, but I imagine this easily translates into something that can still be achieved remotely.

 

 

3 hours ago, vcczar said:

I think my dad registered me in 2000 TX. I don’t remember doing it. I voted Bush because he was from TX too and I was ignorant of the candidates.  In 2004, I voted for Kerry on campus In TX. Most convenient voting experience ever. 

In Canada, voters are already registered if they have a residence and pay income tax (which is a BIG issue their homeless, on welfare or fixed/assured income, or First Nations (who do not pay incomes due to treaty agreements)), which is an issue I have helped many clients overcome. I have even served as a voter assistant twice to illiterate voters - once to a man who even wished to vote for a candidate I found repugnant - Reform Party, then Canadian Alliance, then Canadian Conservative Party of Canada candidate, and slum landlord, Peter Goldring, who help my own constituency from 1997-2011. However, as I've said a few times, official party registration is not at all a thing, and often used to seem "Orwellian," when I was originally heard about it in the U.S.

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2 minutes ago, Wiw said:

I'm sure Dolard thought of that when he had the virus engineered.

Evidence? Or just more paranoid delusional ranting and raving? If the latter, I HIGHLY recommend psychiatric help.

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

 

In Canada, voters are already registered if they have a residence and pay income tax (which is a BIG issue their homeless, on welfare or fixed/assured income, or First Nations (who do not pay incomes due to treaty agreements)), which is an issue I have helped many clients overcome. I have even served as a voter assistant twice to illiterate voters - once to a man who even wished to vote for a candidate I found repugnant - Reform Party, then Canadian Alliance, then Canadian Conservative Party of Canada candidate, and slum landlord, Peter Goldring, who help my own constituency from 1997-2011. However, as I've said a few times, official party registration is not at all a thing, and often used to seem "Orwellian," when I was originally heard about it in the U.S.

Same here, must be a commonwealth thing, you actually have to pay to be a member of a party here, only done that once before... in my shameful years when I was a member of UKIP ugh and it was very cheap cause I technically a student in 2015.

I couldn't imagine paying £20-30 a year for membership to a party that votes on its leadership every 4 to 5 years. You only get to use your membership literally once every five years its a bit ridiculous

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2 hours ago, Actinguy said:

They’re allowed, but I got to Korea in October, just weeks before the election.  I think I’d missed the cut-off date to register for absentee voting.

Got to Iraq in July, so no excuses there.  I just didn’t get around to registering for an absentee ballot.

 

My father-in-law joined the Navy in 1997 and he told me that every election year, sailors would come around asking people to register to vote and if they wanted to. They seem to take it very seriously.

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4 hours ago, vcczar said:

Saw an interesting article about how closing colleges and universities could cost Democrats.

Interesting point.

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6 minutes ago, Patine said:

Evidence? Or just more paranoid delusional ranting and raving? If the latter, I HIGHLY recommend psychiatric help.

Neither. It's conjecture based on events that happened in the last election.

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I feel like if Bernie was the candidate, this would affect me more than Biden cause his support is driven by young people who I assume would show up in a GE more than a primary cause one is more publicized than the other? (i don't know any hard stats on that)

I remember seeing in a lot of places mail-in ballots would benefit Biden, I think that is wrong, mail-in ballots probably would disenfranchise minorities and working class people a lot as they're a lot more busy and have more priorities than retired pensioners, they could end up forgetting entirely to mail their ballot in. 

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6 minutes ago, Wiw said:

Neither. It's conjecture based on events that happened in the last election.

That's a very big - and quite psychotically (note, I had "psychotically," not "psychopathically," before you start raving about THAT again) charged - leap of logic. And calling it "logic," is generous.

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Oh come on - voter supression? That shootout in Orlando? Kim Davis' imprisonment, making the OK sign a white supremacist salute?! Aren't those all things he'd be likely to arrange?!

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