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Patine

Just Voted

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I just voted in the Alberta election here. I think my best hope is that the UCP are forced to minority government status, realistically (though it's unprecedented in Alberta politics, with big majorities always being, and every change of party being a big upset to a new party's majority), but I don't want Kenney, who is not even in the tradition of the 41-year Progressive Conservative dynasty who, with much more moderate, balanced, and adaptive policies (for a centre-right party) turned Alberta into the envy of all other Canadian provinces and a fair number of U.S. States economically and in general development, as Kenney's completely out of touch with that tradition and is just an " unadaptive, noninnovative, stock 21st Century Conservative drone" who would likely nosedive a lot of what makes this Province great if given unrestrained power.

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Although the polls have tightened, for a little while it looked like Notley might be able to close the gap entirely. Notley is polling about as well as her result in 2015, the difference being that Wildrose and the PCs aren't splitting the vote.

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So you are living in Alberta? Sorry I always placed you in British Columbia. I do not know why

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Kenney did win a majority, BUT the smallest majority of any government in Alberta history. That is still a BIG message - especially in Alberta.

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

Kenney did win a majority, BUT the smallest majority of any government in Alberta history. That is still a BIG message - especially in Alberta.

Smallest in votes or seats?

Seats I think NDP was least :( 

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Just now, Edouard said:

Smallest in votes or seats?

Seats I think NDP was least :( 

Percentage of seats available.

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1 minute ago, Edouard said:

Smallest in votes or seats?

Seats I think NDP was least :( 

The opposition was smaller right after the 2015 election.

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Just now, Patine said:

The opposition was smaller right after the 2015 election.

This I did not know :o 

I would've believed it would be difficult for NDP to win a lot of seats in a rural conservative and rich state such as Alberta.

But maybe Wild Rose + Con division helped...

It's a bit sad for the NDP, they took the 2014 oil's crisis in the face as soon as they took office.

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2 minutes ago, Edouard said:

This I did not know :o 

I would've believed it would be difficult for NDP to win a lot of seats in a rural conservative and rich state such as Alberta.

But maybe Wild Rose + Con division helped...

It's a bit sad for the NDP, they took the 2014 oil's crisis in the face as soon as they took office.

Yes, the division certainly helped. Also, they won the northern riding with Fort McMurray, strangely - not on promoting oilsands or pipelines, but on the God-awful, under-developed, and neglected infrastructure that the workers' and their families who brought in Alberta's oil wealth had to endure living in.

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I have been the only person in my Comparative politics class that has mention the Alberta election. I found this election to be interesting and somewhat not surprising. Now the question is if the NDP still keeps Notley as leader of the opposition.

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13 minutes ago, Patine said:

Yes, the division certainly helped. Also, they won the northern riding with Fort McMurray, strangely - not on promoting oilsands or pipelines, but on the God-awful, under-developed, and neglected infrastructure that the workers' and their families who brought in Alberta's oil wealth had to endure living in.

Be sure that now Alberta will even clash with Quebec on oil...

Is Kenney still decided to do a referendum on equalization?

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2 minutes ago, TheLiberalKitten said:

I have been the only person in my Comparative politics class that has mention the Alberta election. I found this election to be interesting and somewhat not surprising. Now the question is if the NDP still keeps Notley as leader of the opposition.

 Probably not, it's not often that a Canadian ruler remains after a defeat...

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Just now, Edouard said:

 Probably not, it's not often that a Canadian ruler remains after a defeat...

I think they might retain her. Especially since she was Premier and has had the governing experience. Perhaps the NDP can take a majority in the next general election if things do not go the way the UCP have planned as usually promises made are unkept.

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1 minute ago, TheLiberalKitten said:

I have been the only person in my Comparative politics class that has mention the Alberta election. I found this election to be interesting and somewhat not surprising. Now the question is if the NDP still keeps Notley as leader of the opposition.

In UK politics (upon which Canadian politics is based), it's practically universal (at least since the end of the Victorian Era) for an incumbent party leader who presides over a defeat and loss of government to get the heave ho. However, there have been some notable exceptions in Canadian politics - such as John A. MacDonald in 1875, Wilfried Laurier in 1911, Arthur Meghan in 1921 and 1926, William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1925 and 1930, John Diefenbaker in 1963, Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1979, and John Turner in 1984, and a lot of examples in the many Provincial elections. That being said, it's far more possible she'll be retained than if she had lost an election as incumbent in the UK.

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3 minutes ago, Edouard said:

 Probably not, it's not often that a Canadian ruler remains after a defeat...

Ahem. Canadian history. Read my post above.

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

In UK politics (upon which Canadian politics is based), it's practically universal (at least since the end of the Victorian Era) for an incumbent party leader who presides over a defeat and loss of government to get the heave ho. However, there have been some notable exceptions in Canadian politics - such as John A. MacDonald in 1875, Wilfried Laurier in 1911, Arthur Meghan in 1921 and 1926, William Lyon Mackenzie King in 1925 and 1930, John Diefenbaker in 1963, Pierre Elliott Trudeau in 1979, and John Turner in 1984, and a lot of examples in the many Provincial elections. That being said, it's far more possible she'll be retained than if she had lost an election as incumbent in the UK.

Good to know! Thanks for this! Gotta love Canada for giving leaders a second chance when their parties lose :P

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Just now, Patine said:

Ahem. Canadian history. Read my post above.

I was aware for Trudeau 😛

In Quebec we had Bernard Landry who stayed after PQ defeat of 2003 but he gone in 2005 after "only" receiving 76% approval rate, something he still thought as an error untll his death.

But apart him I won't count Parizeau and Lévesque during the 70's and 80"s.

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1 minute ago, TheLiberalKitten said:

Good to know! Thanks for this! Gotta love Canada for giving leaders a second chance when their parties lose :P

Also note, that of the PM's listed above, all except Laurier, Diefenbaker, and Turner later returned for at least one more term as PM. :P

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Just now, TheLiberalKitten said:

Good to know! Thanks for this! Gotta love Canada for giving leaders a second chance when their parties lose :P

It depends of the story and culture ;)

PM of Quebec lost her seat in 2014 but retained 30 mps, she resigned of the leadership.

Wynne been re elected but resigned because of her numbers.

The mod of the party with the leader plays a lot. It depends if people are fed up or not

 

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Just now, Patine said:

Also note, that of the PM's listed above, all except Laurier, Diefenbaker, and Turner later returned for at least one more term as PM. :P

Stop using old Canada 😛 

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Now my question is what does election victory for the UCP mean for the national Conservative party? Will it help them in the Oct. Federal election? Will it be the end of the Trudeau government? Will the NDP shock everyone and pull an upset? (Doubtful but hey anything is possible :P ) Tune in next week in PMI: Canada

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8 minutes ago, TheLiberalKitten said:

Now my question is what does election victory for the UCP mean for the national Conservative party? Will it help them in the Oct. Federal election? Will it be the end of the Trudeau government? Will the NDP shock everyone and pull an upset? (Doubtful but hey anything is possible :P ) Tune in next week in PMI: Canada

First, the Federal Conservative Party that exists today (a merger in 2003 of the old Federal Progressive Conservatives and Canadian Alliance) does not, officially and organizationally speaking, have Provincial affiliates, not like the Federal Liberals, NDP, and Green Party, and also unlike the U.S. Federal Democratic and Republican Parties and their State affiliates. The main centre-right-wing to right-wing parties in each Province (the UCP in Alberta, the Saskatchewan Party in Saskatchewan, Legault's Party in Quebec, the Yukon Party in the Yukon (the only territory with partisan politics), the B.C. Liberals (which, like the Australian Liberals, are actually centre-right and dominate the centre-right and Liberal-centre there), and Progressive Conservative Parties in the other six Provinces) are independent and separate parties, with no official tie or affiliation, de jure. Any dealings between the Federal Conservatives and Provincial right-of-centre main parties, or between such Provincial Parties amongst themselves, is independently hammered out and negotiated on a case-by-case basis, unlike the Liberal, NDP, and Green Federal and Provincial affiliates.

 

Corrections

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

First, the Federal Conservative Party that exists today (a merger in 2003 of the old Federal Progressive Conservatives and Canadian Alliance) does not, officially and organizationally speaking, have Provincial affiliates, not like the Federal Liberals, NDP, and Green Party, and also unlike the U.S. Federal Democratic and Republican Parties and their State affiliates. The main centre-right-wing to right-wing in each Province (the UCP in Alberta, the Saskatchewan Party in Saskatchewan, Legault's Party in Quebec, the Yukon Party in the Yukon (the only territory with partisan politics), the B.C. Liberals (which, like the Australian Liberals, are actually centre-left and dominate the centre-and Liberal-centre there), and Progressive Conservative Parties in the other six Provinces) are independent and separate parties, with no official tie or affiliation, de jure. Any dealings between the Federal Conservatives and Provincial right-of-centre main parties, or between such Provincial Parties amongst themselves, is independently hammered out and negotiated on a case-by-case basis, unlike the Liberal, NDP, and Green Federal and Provincial affiliates.

Interesting. Lately center-right parties have been winning in Canada, no? The UCP being an example and last years election in Ontario being another. Forgive me for my lack of knowledge when it comes to Canadian politics :(  but Canada is new to me :)

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