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Sunnymentoaddict

If you were to update, John Kennedy's "Profiles in Courage", who would you add?

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In  short, Kennedy's famous 1957 novel "Profiles in Courage" is due for an update. Who would you add to the list? 

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6 minutes ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

In  short, Kennedy's famous 1957 novel "Profiles in Courage" is due for an update. Who would you add to the list? 

Excellent question!

Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the only Southerner to vote for Civil Rights and Voting Rights in 1964, even though he knew it would cost him reelection. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-MD), the only Republican to really support Nixon's resignation/impeachment wholeheartedly for Watergate. 

Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-MA), for bipartisan efforts with Ronald Reagan to get necessary laws passed despite pressure to use Congress to block all executive initiatives. 

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), for consistent opposition to unnecessary wars and a department of peace during an era of escalated militarism. 

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), for opposition to the Iraq War and embracing of an African-American president, despite his history for militarism and racist policies in the past. 

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), for bucking his own party and saving government healthcare for millions of people that would not be able to afford healthcare otherwise. 

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for moral opposition to the Trump administration, despite being members of the same party, and for their consistent calls for bipartisanship in an era of obstruction. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) for challenging the strongest non-incumbent Democratic frontrunner in the history of the Primary Era and with a political message that was once universally unpopular. 

I'm sure there are about 3 more that I would add. Generally, you need someone that acts positively (and often morally) during a crisis in which the majority behaves opposite of the person with courage. In short, if you are on the "right side of history" early, then you make the book. Some of these politicians could be dropped with the hindsight of 10 or 20 years. 

 

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59 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Excellent question!

Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the only Southerner to vote for Civil Rights and Voting Rights in 1964, even though he knew it would cost him reelection. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-MD), the only Republican to really support Nixon's resignation/impeachment wholeheartedly for Watergate. 

Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-MA), for bipartisan efforts with Ronald Reagan to get necessary laws passed despite pressure to use Congress to block all executive initiatives. 

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), for consistent opposition to unnecessary wars and a department of peace during an era of escalated militarism. 

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), for opposition to the Iraq War and embracing of an African-American president, despite his history for militarism and racist policies in the past. 

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), for bucking his own party and saving government healthcare for millions of people that would not be able to afford healthcare otherwise. 

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for moral opposition to the Trump administration, despite being members of the same party, and for their consistent calls for bipartisanship in an era of obstruction. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) for challenging the strongest non-incumbent Democratic frontrunner in the history of the Primary Era and with a political message that was once universally unpopular. 

I'm sure there are about 3 more that I would add. Generally, you need someone that acts positively (and often morally) during a crisis in which the majority behaves opposite of the person with courage. In short, if you are on the "right side of history" early, then you make the book. Some of these politicians could be dropped with the hindsight of 10 or 20 years. 

 

Y.E.S.

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11 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Excellent question!

Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the only Southerner to vote for Civil Rights and Voting Rights in 1964, even though he knew it would cost him reelection. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-MD), the only Republican to really support Nixon's resignation/impeachment wholeheartedly for Watergate. 

Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-MA), for bipartisan efforts with Ronald Reagan to get necessary laws passed despite pressure to use Congress to block all executive initiatives. 

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), for consistent opposition to unnecessary wars and a department of peace during an era of escalated militarism. 

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), for opposition to the Iraq War and embracing of an African-American president, despite his history for militarism and racist policies in the past. 

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), for bucking his own party and saving government healthcare for millions of people that would not be able to afford healthcare otherwise. 

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for moral opposition to the Trump administration, despite being members of the same party, and for their consistent calls for bipartisanship in an era of obstruction. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) for challenging the strongest non-incumbent Democratic frontrunner in the history of the Primary Era and with a political message that was once universally unpopular. 

I'm sure there are about 3 more that I would add. Generally, you need someone that acts positively (and often morally) during a crisis in which the majority behaves opposite of the person with courage. In short, if you are on the "right side of history" early, then you make the book. Some of these politicians could be dropped with the hindsight of 10 or 20 years. 

 

Senator Ralph Yarborough was my first choice as well.

I'm hesitant on adding Kucinich. Maybe I'm not sold on him just yet. 

Senator Byrd went from filibustering the Civil Rights Act to having a eulogy delivered by the N.A.A.C.P. And he did not just change his views, but denounced his previous positions in a state that is overwhelmingly white. I add that point to emphasize that his change of heart could not be passed as a cynical ploy to gain votes- a la George Wallace in the 1970's. 

Senator John McCain is an excellent as well with the reasons you have provided.  I feel Flake shouldn't for simply retiring from the Senate. Had Flake ran for reelelection this year, I might include him. 


 

 

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TOP 5

5.Dennis Kucinich and Ron Paul,for being unapologetically anti-war.

4.Rosa Parks,for her lifetime of activism.

3.John McCain,for standing up for what he believed is right in this time of political madness

2.Bernie Sanders,for leading the political revolution to transform America,and turning generation to the left.

1.Emma Gonzalez for speaking up against NRA and corrupt politician who would rather risk our lives than few lobbyist bucks.

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2 hours ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

In  short, Kennedy's famous 1957 novel "Profiles in Courage" is due for an update. Who would you add to the list? 

 

2 hours ago, vcczar said:

Excellent question!

Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the only Southerner to vote for Civil Rights and Voting Rights in 1964, even though he knew it would cost him reelection. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-MD), the only Republican to really support Nixon's resignation/impeachment wholeheartedly for Watergate. 

Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-MA), for bipartisan efforts with Ronald Reagan to get necessary laws passed despite pressure to use Congress to block all executive initiatives. 

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), for consistent opposition to unnecessary wars and a department of peace during an era of escalated militarism. 

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), for opposition to the Iraq War and embracing of an African-American president, despite his history for militarism and racist policies in the past. 

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), for bucking his own party and saving government healthcare for millions of people that would not be able to afford healthcare otherwise. 

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for moral opposition to the Trump administration, despite being members of the same party, and for their consistent calls for bipartisanship in an era of obstruction. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) for challenging the strongest non-incumbent Democratic frontrunner in the history of the Primary Era and with a political message that was once universally unpopular. 

I'm sure there are about 3 more that I would add. Generally, you need someone that acts positively (and often morally) during a crisis in which the majority behaves opposite of the person with courage. In short, if you are on the "right side of history" early, then you make the book. Some of these politicians could be dropped with the hindsight of 10 or 20 years. 

 

 

55 minutes ago, Rodja said:

TOP 5

5.Dennis Kucinich and Ron Paul,for being unapologetically anti-war.

4.Rosa Parks,for her lifetime of activism.

3.John McCain,for standing up for what he believed is right in this time of political madness

2.Bernie Sanders,for leading the political revolution to transform America,and turning generation to the left.

1.Emma Gonzalez for speaking up against NRA and corrupt politician who would rather risk our lives than few lobbyist bucks.

Just as a note - not as a disrespect, but a note on perspective, as Americans can often, even without thinking about it, become quite parochial in viewpoint and think of their nation in a socio-political void, I've noticed - some acts of political courage that may stagger most Americans, as they practically never happen to that degree (arguably, are not yet needed - knock on wood) in the U.S. - but are quite astounding nonetheless.

-Lech Walsea, a factory foreman in Poland, was fired from his job, arrested, and beaten for being heard by his Communist Party-employed boss uttering anti-regime rhetoric. He formed Solidarity, the first non-Communist labour union in the Warsaw Pact since the Second World War, initially illegal, with members being spied on, arrested, beaten, and a few disappeared outright, but this organization set the dominoes in motion that toppled the Communist Governments of the Warsaw Pact.

-An unknown Arab man who set himself on fire in a bazaar at high market time to protest absolute monarchialism, militant despotism, and Islamic fundamentalism as the predominant forms of government in the Arab World, beginning the Arab Spring.

-Nelson Mandela, after serving 27 years of hard prison time (a commuting by political compromise by State President F.W. De Klerk from life) was met by his more militant lieutenant (and later South African President) Jacob Zuma right after leaving prison, who said to him, "when do we act. There is an arms embargo on this nation, but WE have arms. We are the majority, and no one backs this corrupt regime anymore. We have the Boers on the ropes. When do we start a civil war and take back our country by blood and force." Mandela did not give into Zuma's desire for violence and steadfastly followed his planned path of emulating Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, jr.'s tactics.

I guess it's just that many, while many Americans have worked for positive change and even risked their reputations and careers over it, I think the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's was the last time Americans in significant, verified numbers risked their freedoms and lives and faced mass institutional social prejudice and the threat of bodily harm to advocate for change and their own rights, although, on a smaller scale, the Stonewall Riots and surrounding events in the '70's were certainly of the same mold as well.

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4 hours ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

Senator Ralph Yarborough was my first choice as well.

I'm hesitant on adding Kucinich. Maybe I'm not sold on him just yet. 

Senator Byrd went from filibustering the Civil Rights Act to having a eulogy delivered by the N.A.A.C.P. And he did not just change his views, but denounced his previous positions in a state that is overwhelmingly white. I add that point to emphasize that his change of heart could not be passed as a cynical ploy to gain votes- a la George Wallace in the 1970's. 

Senator John McCain is an excellent as well with the reasons you have provided.  I feel Flake shouldn't for simply retiring from the Senate. Had Flake ran for reelelection this year, I might include him. 


 

 

I don't think George Wallace was a cynical ploy, I think he truly repented.

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11 hours ago, Patine said:

 

 

Just as a note - not as a disrespect, but a note on perspective, as Americans can often, even without thinking about it, become quite parochial in viewpoint and think of their nation in a socio-political void, I've noticed - some acts of political courage that may stagger most Americans, as they practically never happen to that degree (arguably, are not yet needed - knock on wood) in the U.S. - but are quite astounding nonetheless.

-Lech Walsea, a factory foreman in Poland, was fired from his job, arrested, and beaten for being heard by his Communist Party-employed boss uttering anti-regime rhetoric. He formed Solidarity, the first non-Communist labour union in the Warsaw Pact since the Second World War, initially illegal, with members being spied on, arrested, beaten, and a few disappeared outright, but this organization set the dominoes in motion that toppled the Communist Governments of the Warsaw Pact.

-An unknown Arab man who set himself on fire in a bazaar at high market time to protest absolute monarchialism, militant despotism, and Islamic fundamentalism as the predominant forms of government in the Arab World, beginning the Arab Spring.

-Nelson Mandela, after serving 27 years of hard prison time (a commuting by political compromise by State President F.W. De Klerk from life) was met by his more militant lieutenant (and later South African President) Jacob Zuma right after leaving prison, who said to him, "when do we act. There is an arms embargo on this nation, but WE have arms. We are the majority, and no one backs this corrupt regime anymore. We have the Boers on the ropes. When do we start a civil war and take back our country by blood and force." Mandela did not give into Zuma's desire for violence and steadfastly followed his planned path of emulating Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, jr.'s tactics.

I guess it's just that many, while many Americans have worked for positive change and even risked their reputations and careers over it, I think the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's was the last time Americans in significant, verified numbers risked their freedoms and lives and faced mass institutional social prejudice and the threat of bodily harm to advocate for change and their own rights, although, on a smaller scale, the Stonewall Riots and surrounding events in the '70's were certainly of the same mold as well.

Another nonAmerican that should be added is Otto Wells: the leader of the SDP during the rise of Nazi Party in Germany.

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12 hours ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

Another nonAmerican that should be added is Otto Wells: the leader of the SDP during the rise of Nazi Party in Germany.

Yes. It is not a commonly known fact that Social Democrats, Communists, and other members of (and activists for) "incompatible" opposition parties were the very first targeted for the pogrom and concentration camps actively in Nazi Germany, before any Jews, Romani, Jehovah's Witnesses, homosexuals, non-Whites, or other targeted demographics were rounded up - and this included Otto Wells, as well as Hitler's archrival in Weimar Republic elections, General Secretary of the Communist Party of Germany Ernst Thalmann, whom his chief party lieutenant and campaign director (to him what Goebbels was to Hitler at the time) Walter Ulbrict, who fled the country before election night, March 1933, eventually ending up in Moscow and sucking up good to Stalin, and returning to Germany after the war to become the architect and first leader of East Germany with Stalin's full backing, who made Thalmann the biggest martyr in the whole Warsaw Pact - but I digress there.

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On 10/23/2018 at 12:57 PM, vcczar said:

Excellent question!

Sen. Ralph Yarborough (D-TX), the only Southerner to vote for Civil Rights and Voting Rights in 1964, even though he knew it would cost him reelection. 

Rep. Lawrence Hogan (R-MD), the only Republican to really support Nixon's resignation/impeachment wholeheartedly for Watergate. 

Speaker Tip O'Neill (D-MA), for bipartisan efforts with Ronald Reagan to get necessary laws passed despite pressure to use Congress to block all executive initiatives. 

Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), for consistent opposition to unnecessary wars and a department of peace during an era of escalated militarism. 

Sen. Robert Byrd (D-WV), for opposition to the Iraq War and embracing of an African-American president, despite his history for militarism and racist policies in the past. 

Sen. John McCain (R-AZ), for bucking his own party and saving government healthcare for millions of people that would not be able to afford healthcare otherwise. 

Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) and Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) for moral opposition to the Trump administration, despite being members of the same party, and for their consistent calls for bipartisanship in an era of obstruction. 

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) for challenging the strongest non-incumbent Democratic frontrunner in the history of the Primary Era and with a political message that was once universally unpopular. 

I'm sure there are about 3 more that I would add. Generally, you need someone that acts positively (and often morally) during a crisis in which the majority behaves opposite of the person with courage. In short, if you are on the "right side of history" early, then you make the book. Some of these politicians could be dropped with the hindsight of 10 or 20 years. 

 

I agree with every single one of these,except John Kasich. I completely disagree with the selection of him.

 

Also I have a question,what do you think of Trump’s job so far as president?

 

this can be for anyone else on the thread.

 

Need to ask 10 people for my political sceince class,online or in person.

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3 hours ago, TheMiddlePolitical said:

I agree with every single one of these,except John Kasich. I completely disagree with the selection of him.

 

Also I have a question,what do you think of Trump’s job so far as president?

 

this can be for anyone else on the thread.

 

Need to ask 10 people for my political sceince class,online or in person.

I’d rank him anywhere from #35 to #38 if I were to rank the presidents. He’s done best in areas where he hasn’t hurt anything (Obama’s economy, for instance). I can’t think of anything that’s he’s improved. I do like that he’s opened dialogue with North Korea and that he’s avoided major wars. His leadership has been abysmal, his rhetoric toxic, and his behavior unbecoming of a president or leader, in general. I think the policies he promotes, and those few that he has been able to enforce, are almost wholly bad. Fortunately, the courts seem to routinely hold up some of his policies in court. A disaster through and through. 

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52 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Fortunately, the courts seem to routinely hold up some of his policies in court.

Did you mean to include a negative qualifier somewhere in this sentence you forgot to include.

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52 minutes ago, Patine said:

Did you mean to include a negative qualifier somewhere in this sentence you forgot to include.

I went hold up in a negative sense, as in delayed. However “blocked” is what I should have said. 

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