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ThePotatoWalrus

No Outrage Over the Net?

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Net Neutrality has been repealed for nearly 20 days now (despite the Senate voting to uphold it, for some reason). I was surprised to see that in 20 days there has been no outrage over it.

Wait a minute...

Maybe I was right, and nothing has changed besides the fact that the government no longer over-regulates the internet? Where are the pay-to-use subscriptions to websites and apps that I've heard about? Why aren't tons of websites blocked off on my devices?

My point here is to do the research yourself on a subject instead of allowing yourself to be blatantly misinformed by a media campaign. The Internet is not going to die (in fact, it's just going back to the same regulation it had in pre-2016, where businesses flourished under less regulation)

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/06/11/technology/net-neutrality-repeal.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States#cite_note-nyt-repealed-4

internettimeline.png

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17 hours ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

Net Neutrality has been repealed for nearly 20 days now (despite the Senate voting to uphold it, for some reason). I was surprised to see that in 20 days there has been no outrage over it.

Wait a minute...

Maybe I was right, and nothing has changed besides the fact that the government no longer over-regulates the internet? Where are the pay-to-use subscriptions to websites and apps that I've heard about? Why aren't tons of websites blocked off on my devices?

My point here is to do the research yourself on a subject instead of allowing yourself to be blatantly misinformed by a media campaign. The Internet is not going to die (in fact, it's just going back to the same regulation it had in pre-2016, where businesses flourished under less regulation)

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/06/11/technology/net-neutrality-repeal.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States#cite_note-nyt-repealed-4

internettimeline.png

Yes, it's been a whole 20 days and therefore everything is fine. Glad to see that if nothing bad has happened within 20 days we are in the clear...

 

I highly doubt the things many people worried about (like splitting the internet into website packages) will happen, but to declare that reverting a policy will have no negative effects just because it hasn't had any in a whole three weeks is just silly.

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37 minutes ago, jnewt said:

Yes, it's been a whole 20 days and therefore everything is fine. Glad to see that if nothing bad has happened within 20 days we are in the clear...

 

I highly doubt the things many people worried about (like splitting the internet into website packages) will happen, but to declare that reverting a policy will have no negative effects just because it hasn't had any in a whole three weeks is just silly.

Well, if 20 days isn't convincing enough, you can always look back on 50 years...

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2 minutes ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

Well, if 20 days isn't convincing enough, you can always look back on 50 years...

The modern internet has not been around 50 years, so no I actually can't. The internet was not publicly available until the 1990s when the world wide web was invented, and the modern internet has been around an even shorter amount of time than that.

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12 minutes ago, jnewt said:

The modern internet has not been around 50 years, so no I actually can't. The internet was not publicly available until the 1990s when the world wide web was invented, and the modern internet has been around an even shorter amount of time than that.

So, I'd say the modern internet has been around for at least a decade then.

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2 hours ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

So, I'd say the modern internet has been around for at least a decade then.

But it wasn't even formally addressed legally by any but a few polities for the first several years of it's existence - not formally addressed legally like we know it now. The State of California and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea were among the first two polities to formally and specifically legislate on it.

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 @ThePotatoWalrus It's stupid to violate popular rules as soon as there repealed it makes it too obvious which will cause their re-implementation. It's comparable to allow drilling in national parks and how people won't just go in and be like "It's been one second since the law's been repealed let's get drillin' "

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46 minutes ago, NYrepublican said:

 @ThePotatoWalrus It's stupid to violate popular rules as soon as there repealed it makes it too obvious which will cause their re-implementation. It's comparable to allow drilling in national parks and how people won't just go in and be like "It's been one second since the law's been repealed let's get drillin' "

This is a very good point—if net neutrality is ever violated the way people have dramatized, it will probably take years.

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22 hours ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

Net Neutrality has been repealed for nearly 20 days now (despite the Senate voting to uphold it, for some reason). I was surprised to see that in 20 days there has been no outrage over it.

Wait a minute...

Maybe I was right, and nothing has changed besides the fact that the government no longer over-regulates the internet? Where are the pay-to-use subscriptions to websites and apps that I've heard about? Why aren't tons of websites blocked off on my devices?

My point here is to do the research yourself on a subject instead of allowing yourself to be blatantly misinformed by a media campaign. The Internet is not going to die (in fact, it's just going back to the same regulation it had in pre-2016, where businesses flourished under less regulation)

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/06/11/technology/net-neutrality-repeal.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States#cite_note-nyt-repealed-4

internettimeline.png

Also Net Neutrality began in a watered down form since 2005.

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22 hours ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

Net Neutrality has been repealed for nearly 20 days now (despite the Senate voting to uphold it, for some reason). I was surprised to see that in 20 days there has been no outrage over it.

Wait a minute...

Maybe I was right, and nothing has changed besides the fact that the government no longer over-regulates the internet? Where are the pay-to-use subscriptions to websites and apps that I've heard about? Why aren't tons of websites blocked off on my devices?

My point here is to do the research yourself on a subject instead of allowing yourself to be blatantly misinformed by a media campaign. The Internet is not going to die (in fact, it's just going back to the same regulation it had in pre-2016, where businesses flourished under less regulation)

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/06/11/technology/net-neutrality-repeal.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States#cite_note-nyt-repealed-4

internettimeline.png

That's missing Windows 10 Linux Kernel 4 etc.

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Anyway, if there's been no outrage over it, this just means that people have accepted the situation. They are angry, and this is going to affect things.

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On 6/30/2018 at 12:40 AM, ThePotatoWalrus said:

Net Neutrality has been repealed for nearly 20 days now (despite the Senate voting to uphold it, for some reason). I was surprised to see that in 20 days there has been no outrage over it.

Wait a minute...

Maybe I was right, and nothing has changed besides the fact that the government no longer over-regulates the internet? Where are the pay-to-use subscriptions to websites and apps that I've heard about? Why aren't tons of websites blocked off on my devices?

My point here is to do the research yourself on a subject instead of allowing yourself to be blatantly misinformed by a media campaign. The Internet is not going to die (in fact, it's just going back to the same regulation it had in pre-2016, where businesses flourished under less regulation)

 https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/06/11/technology/net-neutrality-repeal.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality_in_the_United_States#cite_note-nyt-repealed-4

internettimeline.png

More importantly you need to prove causation. Until the 90's the law didn't even acknowledge the Internet's existence knocking out many of the early examples. 

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On ‎7‎/‎1‎/‎2018 at 2:00 AM, Wiw said:

Anyway, if there's been no outrage over it, this just means that people have accepted the situation. They are angry, and this is going to affect things.

 

18 minutes ago, NYrepublican said:

More importantly you need to prove causation. Until the 90's the law didn't even acknowledge the Internet's existence knocking out many of the early examples. 

The problem is, realistically, despite many people's Americo-Centric view of the world, the Internet is NOT the sole, legal jurisdiction of the U.S. Government. Thus, the U.S. Government ALONE cannot solve these issues, nor has the legal authority or mandate on it's own do. For fear of being attacked by frothing, short-sighted, red-eyed, self-destructive, and major movers along the death spiral of global civilization known as "parochials" and "nationalists" of all sorts, regions, and nations, like frenzying shark, only international solutions and consensus is going to make ANY truly productive solutions in Internet law because of the way the Internet works.

Edited.

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4 minutes ago, Patine said:

 

 The problem is, realistically, despite many people's Americo-Centric view of the world, the Internet is the sole, legal jurisdiction of the U.S. Government. 

Thanks @Patine for finally admitting the truth.

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2 minutes ago, Patine said:

It was a mistype, bonehead! The context makes that clear, and you know it.

Pat, I think he was joking.

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2 minutes ago, Patine said:

It was a mistype, bonehead! The context makes that clear, and you know it.

You really need to proof-read your posts for typos before hitting submit.

10 minutes ago, Patine said:

 

 The problem is, realistically, despite many people's Americo-Centric view of the world, the Internet is NOT the sole, legal jurisdiction of the U.S. Government. Thus, the U.S. Government ALONE cannot solve these issues, nor has the legal authority or mandate on it's own do. For fear of being attacked by frothing, short-sighted, red-eyed, self-destructive, and major movers along the death spiral of global civilization known as "parochials" and "nationalists" of all sorts, regions, and nations, like frenzying shark, only international solutions and consensus is going to make ANY truly productive solutions in Internet law because of the way the Internet works.

 Edited.

Well it can control internet access in it's borders.

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1 minute ago, NYrepublican said:

You really need to proof-read your posts for typos before hitting submit.

Well it can control internet access in it's borders.

So can every sovereign nation that doesn't completely contract out it's Internet service to a foreign corporation (which, admittedly, some small and very poor countries do). In fact, North Korea bans all incoming and outgoing traffic, except for heavily monitored and approved government, military, and propaganda-spreading usage in it's borders - North Korean citizens can only connect to a national intranet that only allows traffic to other websites WITHIN North Korea. However, hackers, phishers, scammers, spammers, etc. have methods of circumventing national "Internet sovereignty" and can ONLY really be dealt with by international cooperation. Also, big Internet corporations that operate internationally cannot be dealt with effectively, for good or for ill, by one nation's laws alone.

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

So can every sovereign nation that doesn't completely contract out it's Internet service to a foreign corporation (which, admittedly, some small and very poor countries do). In fact, North Korea bans all incoming and outgoing traffic, except for heavily monitored and approved government, military, and propaganda-spreading usage in it's borders - North Korean citizens can only connect to a national intranet that only allows traffic to other websites WITHIN North Korea. However, hackers, phishers, scammers, spammers, etc. have methods of circumventing national "Internet sovereignty" and can ONLY really be dealt with by international cooperation. Also, big Internet corporations that operate internationally cannot be dealt with effectively, for good or for ill, by one nation's laws alone.

True.

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6 minutes ago, NYrepublican said:

True.

Big corporations that operate internationally are a huge challenge today for unilateral national jurisdiction and laws to deal with. And unlike human trafficking, the illegal drug trade, smuggling, "terrorism" (a word and label I still detest as a tool future tyranny waiting to be slapped on the people of the First World by upcoming governments), illegal arms dealing, etc., there are no standing international treaties or agreements of any real sort to deal with the ways and methods big, international, globalized corporations operate today. All of the old commerce and trade treaties in existence are woefully obsolete, and NOT up to the task. Hell, many governments (including the U.S.) don't have satisfactory and enforceable laws to prevent undue influence on their own government by big corporations, as it stands.

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