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vcczar

New Historical President RP

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:
Samuel Lewis's First Term Results 1797-1801:
Lewis's term did not see an increase in the size of the country. Economically, the country began to natural industrialize and trade increased through the Jay Treaty signed during Bunt's term. Congress advocated taxation to spur more growth, but Lewis was hesitant as a new tax rebellion consumed his entire term. Rather than enrage the rebels further, Lewis attempted to compromise, but the process took up the entire term. Ultimately, a minimal professional army and navy was established with a slight increase in tariff and taxation, but the bill freezes any future taxation for four years. Some saw this action as a benevolent compromise, some saw this as the actions of a weak executive, paralyzed by rebel forces. As Lewis's term ends, the rebels have not yet had the chance to react to this compromise. As such, Lewis's watered-down infrastructure bill is held up in Congress, blocking one of Lewis's campaign promise. Some see Lewis's presidency as one that had high ideals and goals, but were not exactly in tune with the economic and social tensions of the nation at the time. To Lewis's credit, he cleverly secured peace with France, ensuring another "Most Favored Trade Partner," (although, tensions with Britain now increase) and formally unshackling us from an unhealthy alliance. Lewis also continued Bunt's policy of paying tribute to the pirates, but notes that it will end once a navy is constructed. 
 
State of the Union Following Lewis's Decisions

National Strength: 3rd-tier country. The US now includes KY, VT, TN, with land cleared for settlement in future OH and IN. 

Military Strength: Weak, a professional army of 5,000 mean and a professional navy of 3 ships have been established, giving us some hope for the future, should be increase these numbers. 

Foreign Affairs: The British are still unofficially impressing our sailors into their navy, and tensions have increased now that we have given France, "Most Favored Trading Partner," a title which Britain now must share with France. To the credit of Britain, they have refrained from retaliating against us for now, allowing profitable trade to sail to both shores. The French have now stopped attacking our ships, and any threat from the French has gone as they turn their eyes back on Europe. We still give tribute to the Barbary Pirates to protect our ships from pirate attacks. Relations with Spain, a decaying empire, are positive. 

Military engagements: Our mostly-militia based force is currently defending against a tax rebellion in Pennsylvania, and a few militia men guard against potential Indian attacks in the frontier. A professional army is on its way to Pennsylvania. 

Economy: Weak-to-medium, but growing. We are still in debt, but we are on the pathway to paying it off. The outlook is hopeful, as revenue is coming in through tariff and taxation. Not much manufacturing and industrial production outside New England, which finally has at least three European-quality facility. Outlook for production growth is hopeful with Hamiltonian economic policies in place. The South is very agrarian, but profitable for the people. The agrarian sectors are critical of our current economic policies.

Trade: Protective Tariff allows for industrial growth in New England as well as revenue. The South opposes this tariff as it somewhat restricts their profits. International trade has grown because of the Jay Treaty with Britain and because of the recent Peace Treaty with France. About 80% of our international trade is via Britain, 10% is via France, and 10% via the rest of Europe. The Pirates are being paid tribute, so we are free from attacks. 

Budget: Small, and most revenue we gather is going to paying off the national debt. About 60% of our budget is going to military upkeep and creation and to protect the boarders and depend against the tax rebels. 20% is going to paying off the national debt. 20% is going to government upkeep. We have almost nothing for expansion at the moment, but we are hopeful that the trade and tariffs will make this possible within another term or two. 

Social Harmony: Federal taxation has caused a second rebellion in Pennsylvania, and there is some fear this could expand. Slight tension between Northern and Southern economies and world view. The South and West opposes the government's economic policies, but there is no threat of disunion at the moment. Some Northerners are upset about the Fugitive Slave Act as contradicts their Free State status. The Jay Treaty, which is wildly supported in New England, has increased tensions, most prominently in the South and West. The Sedition Acts signed by Lewis have emboldened Republicans, but they were relieved he did not sign all of the acts. 

Immigration: Limited. Congress slightly increased the time to become a citizen. We have a lenient policy.  Mostly Protestant Scots-Irish, Protestant French, and a few Protestant Germans arrive, but they do not yet pose a danger to our more English-descent Protestant Culture. Most of these immigrants are moving to settle the West. If they move to a city, it is to NYC or Philadelphia. Lewis defied his party by refusing to sign a restrictive immigration act. 

Mood of the people: Mostly positive and proud with mild grumblings in the South. and lands West of the Appalachians. 

Popularity of the Incumbent: Moderate, with a 50% chance of reelection. Independents have mostly been pleased with Lewis, for defying his party by avoiding war with France and by refusing to sign an immigration bill. His own party is critical of Lewis for these reasons, including his hesitancy to use force on the Tax Rebels. Many Federalists, while supporting his campaign promises, believed that Lewis had few ideas on how to make these promises practical. Republicans have earned some respect for Lewis, but are using the tax rebellion as fuel to make Lewis a one-term president. Despite a likely challenge from both his party and the other party, Lewis has a shot at gaining another term, where he might be able to fulfill his promises. 

Party Power: Federalists lead in the Senate, but they are not dominant. The US House is split. Governorships are now overwhelmingly Republican, except in New England

@WVProgressive @Reagan04 @Sami @Kingthero @vcczar @Rodja @Conservative Elector 2 @LokiLoki22 @Lyly @TheMiddlePolitical

@Illinois Moderate

Will Federalist Samuel Lewis run for the presidency for a 2nd term? Who will aim to run for the president/vice presidency? [Please create a first and last name for your character, a home state, their office, their party (Fed or Rep), and some sort of response to Lewis's presidency that will allow us to see your potential platform. You have 24 hours to make a candidate. Please quote this entire message when responding to this or your nomination will not count.]

 
  •  

 

Lewis announces he seeks a second term but makes clear that the industrialization of the country will pass first, and plays on his moderation to wins the keys races for a second term.

Patform: Colonize Oh and Ind, pursue creation of jobs and modernization of the industry and transports.

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8 minutes ago, Rodja said:

OOC:I will skip these elections because of personal problems.

All the best to solve your problems!

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[OCC: We need at least one more Federalist and one more Republican to run for president]

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15 minutes ago, Conservative Elector 2 said:

All the best to solve your problems!

(OOC: +1 concerning Roda)

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5 hours ago, Sami said:
Samuel Lewis's First Term Results 1797-1801:
Lewis's term did not see an increase in the size of the country. Economically, the country began to natural industrialize and trade increased through the Jay Treaty signed during Bunt's term. Congress advocated taxation to spur more growth, but Lewis was hesitant as a new tax rebellion consumed his entire term. Rather than enrage the rebels further, Lewis attempted to compromise, but the process took up the entire term. Ultimately, a minimal professional army and navy was established with a slight increase in tariff and taxation, but the bill freezes any future taxation for four years. Some saw this action as a benevolent compromise, some saw this as the actions of a weak executive, paralyzed by rebel forces. As Lewis's term ends, the rebels have not yet had the chance to react to this compromise. As such, Lewis's watered-down infrastructure bill is held up in Congress, blocking one of Lewis's campaign promise. Some see Lewis's presidency as one that had high ideals and goals, but were not exactly in tune with the economic and social tensions of the nation at the time. To Lewis's credit, he cleverly secured peace with France, ensuring another "Most Favored Trade Partner," (although, tensions with Britain now increase) and formally unshackling us from an unhealthy alliance. Lewis also continued Bunt's policy of paying tribute to the pirates, but notes that it will end once a navy is constructed. 
 
State of the Union Following Lewis's Decisions

National Strength: 3rd-tier country. The US now includes KY, VT, TN, with land cleared for settlement in future OH and IN. 

Military Strength: Weak, a professional army of 5,000 mean and a professional navy of 3 ships have been established, giving us some hope for the future, should be increase these numbers. 

Foreign Affairs: The British are still unofficially impressing our sailors into their navy, and tensions have increased now that we have given France, "Most Favored Trading Partner," a title which Britain now must share with France. To the credit of Britain, they have refrained from retaliating against us for now, allowing profitable trade to sail to both shores. The French have now stopped attacking our ships, and any threat from the French has gone as they turn their eyes back on Europe. We still give tribute to the Barbary Pirates to protect our ships from pirate attacks. Relations with Spain, a decaying empire, are positive. 

Military engagements: Our mostly-militia based force is currently defending against a tax rebellion in Pennsylvania, and a few militia men guard against potential Indian attacks in the frontier. A professional army is on its way to Pennsylvania. 

Economy: Weak-to-medium, but growing. We are still in debt, but we are on the pathway to paying it off. The outlook is hopeful, as revenue is coming in through tariff and taxation. Not much manufacturing and industrial production outside New England, which finally has at least three European-quality facility. Outlook for production growth is hopeful with Hamiltonian economic policies in place. The South is very agrarian, but profitable for the people. The agrarian sectors are critical of our current economic policies.

Trade: Protective Tariff allows for industrial growth in New England as well as revenue. The South opposes this tariff as it somewhat restricts their profits. International trade has grown because of the Jay Treaty with Britain and because of the recent Peace Treaty with France. About 80% of our international trade is via Britain, 10% is via France, and 10% via the rest of Europe. The Pirates are being paid tribute, so we are free from attacks. 

Budget: Small, and most revenue we gather is going to paying off the national debt. About 60% of our budget is going to military upkeep and creation and to protect the boarders and depend against the tax rebels. 20% is going to paying off the national debt. 20% is going to government upkeep. We have almost nothing for expansion at the moment, but we are hopeful that the trade and tariffs will make this possible within another term or two. 

Social Harmony: Federal taxation has caused a second rebellion in Pennsylvania, and there is some fear this could expand. Slight tension between Northern and Southern economies and world view. The South and West opposes the government's economic policies, but there is no threat of disunion at the moment. Some Northerners are upset about the Fugitive Slave Act as contradicts their Free State status. The Jay Treaty, which is wildly supported in New England, has increased tensions, most prominently in the South and West. The Sedition Acts signed by Lewis have emboldened Republicans, but they were relieved he did not sign all of the acts. 

Immigration: Limited. Congress slightly increased the time to become a citizen. We have a lenient policy.  Mostly Protestant Scots-Irish, Protestant French, and a few Protestant Germans arrive, but they do not yet pose a danger to our more English-descent Protestant Culture. Most of these immigrants are moving to settle the West. If they move to a city, it is to NYC or Philadelphia. Lewis defied his party by refusing to sign a restrictive immigration act. 

Mood of the people: Mostly positive and proud with mild grumblings in the South. and lands West of the Appalachians. 

Popularity of the Incumbent: Moderate, with a 50% chance of reelection. Independents have mostly been pleased with Lewis, for defying his party by avoiding war with France and by refusing to sign an immigration bill. His own party is critical of Lewis for these reasons, including his hesitancy to use force on the Tax Rebels. Many Federalists, while supporting his campaign promises, believed that Lewis had few ideas on how to make these promises practical. Republicans have earned some respect for Lewis, but are using the tax rebellion as fuel to make Lewis a one-term president. Despite a likely challenge from both his party and the other party, Lewis has a shot at gaining another term, where he might be able to fulfill his promises. 

Party Power: Federalists lead in the Senate, but they are not dominant. The US House is split. Governorships are now overwhelmingly Republican, except in New England

@WVProgressive @Reagan04 @Sami @Kingthero @vcczar @Rodja @Conservative Elector 2 @LokiLoki22 @Lyly @TheMiddlePolitical

@Illinois Moderate

Will Federalist Samuel Lewis run for the presidency for a 2nd term? Who will aim to run for the president/vice presidency? [Please create a first and last name for your character, a home state, their office, their party (Fed or Rep), and some sort of response to Lewis's presidency that will allow us to see your potential platform. You have 24 hours to make a candidate. Please quote this entire message when responding to this or your nomination will not count.]

General George Winston will run as a Federalist from New York for President on lower taxes, increasing technology discovery, and taking a more hawkish foreign policy to gain land.

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2 minutes ago, Illinois Moderate said:

 

General George Winston will run as a Federalist on lower taxes, increasing technology discovery, and taking a more hawkish foreign policy to gain land.

OOC: You sound like a Civilization series game leader here. I don't think that's how real political candidates phrase their platforms, to be honest... :P 

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37 minutes ago, Illinois Moderate said:

OOC: Maybe I've been playing too much Civ.

OOC: Don't get me wrong, I love Civ. But learning to "change gears" in playing different games is a very useful strategy. ;) 

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3 minutes ago, Sami said:

(I forgot to add!)

Lewis platform on tax: Freeze the % code.

OOC: Did taxes function on a percentage based tax code in the U.S. - or any nation on Earth - in the late 18th Century? I'm pretty sure that's not how taxation worked anywhere in the world back then.

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1 hour ago, Patine said:

OOC: Did taxes function on a percentage based tax code in the U.S. - or any nation on Earth - in the late 18th Century? I'm pretty sure that's not how taxation worked anywhere in the world back then.

OOC: Roh I try to formulize it correctly teacher xD

The idea is to not raise taxs

I'm yet learning my fiscal law evolution currently, and I ensure you, it's awfull

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8 hours ago, vcczar said:
Samuel Lewis's First Term Results 1797-1801:
Lewis's term did not see an increase in the size of the country. Economically, the country began to natural industrialize and trade increased through the Jay Treaty signed during Bunt's term. Congress advocated taxation to spur more growth, but Lewis was hesitant as a new tax rebellion consumed his entire term. Rather than enrage the rebels further, Lewis attempted to compromise, but the process took up the entire term. Ultimately, a minimal professional army and navy was established with a slight increase in tariff and taxation, but the bill freezes any future taxation for four years. Some saw this action as a benevolent compromise, some saw this as the actions of a weak executive, paralyzed by rebel forces. As Lewis's term ends, the rebels have not yet had the chance to react to this compromise. As such, Lewis's watered-down infrastructure bill is held up in Congress, blocking one of Lewis's campaign promise. Some see Lewis's presidency as one that had high ideals and goals, but were not exactly in tune with the economic and social tensions of the nation at the time. To Lewis's credit, he cleverly secured peace with France, ensuring another "Most Favored Trade Partner," (although, tensions with Britain now increase) and formally unshackling us from an unhealthy alliance. Lewis also continued Bunt's policy of paying tribute to the pirates, but notes that it will end once a navy is constructed. 
 
State of the Union Following Lewis's Decisions

National Strength: 3rd-tier country. The US now includes KY, VT, TN, with land cleared for settlement in future OH and IN. 

Military Strength: Weak, a professional army of 5,000 mean and a professional navy of 3 ships have been established, giving us some hope for the future, should be increase these numbers. 

Foreign Affairs: The British are still unofficially impressing our sailors into their navy, and tensions have increased now that we have given France, "Most Favored Trading Partner," a title which Britain now must share with France. To the credit of Britain, they have refrained from retaliating against us for now, allowing profitable trade to sail to both shores. The French have now stopped attacking our ships, and any threat from the French has gone as they turn their eyes back on Europe. We still give tribute to the Barbary Pirates to protect our ships from pirate attacks. Relations with Spain, a decaying empire, are positive. 

Military engagements: Our mostly-militia based force is currently defending against a tax rebellion in Pennsylvania, and a few militia men guard against potential Indian attacks in the frontier. A professional army is on its way to Pennsylvania. 

Economy: Weak-to-medium, but growing. We are still in debt, but we are on the pathway to paying it off. The outlook is hopeful, as revenue is coming in through tariff and taxation. Not much manufacturing and industrial production outside New England, which finally has at least three European-quality facility. Outlook for production growth is hopeful with Hamiltonian economic policies in place. The South is very agrarian, but profitable for the people. The agrarian sectors are critical of our current economic policies.

Trade: Protective Tariff allows for industrial growth in New England as well as revenue. The South opposes this tariff as it somewhat restricts their profits. International trade has grown because of the Jay Treaty with Britain and because of the recent Peace Treaty with France. About 80% of our international trade is via Britain, 10% is via France, and 10% via the rest of Europe. The Pirates are being paid tribute, so we are free from attacks. 

Budget: Small, and most revenue we gather is going to paying off the national debt. About 60% of our budget is going to military upkeep and creation and to protect the boarders and depend against the tax rebels. 20% is going to paying off the national debt. 20% is going to government upkeep. We have almost nothing for expansion at the moment, but we are hopeful that the trade and tariffs will make this possible within another term or two. 

Social Harmony: Federal taxation has caused a second rebellion in Pennsylvania, and there is some fear this could expand. Slight tension between Northern and Southern economies and world view. The South and West opposes the government's economic policies, but there is no threat of disunion at the moment. Some Northerners are upset about the Fugitive Slave Act as contradicts their Free State status. The Jay Treaty, which is wildly supported in New England, has increased tensions, most prominently in the South and West. The Sedition Acts signed by Lewis have emboldened Republicans, but they were relieved he did not sign all of the acts. 

Immigration: Limited. Congress slightly increased the time to become a citizen. We have a lenient policy.  Mostly Protestant Scots-Irish, Protestant French, and a few Protestant Germans arrive, but they do not yet pose a danger to our more English-descent Protestant Culture. Most of these immigrants are moving to settle the West. If they move to a city, it is to NYC or Philadelphia. Lewis defied his party by refusing to sign a restrictive immigration act. 

Mood of the people: Mostly positive and proud with mild grumblings in the South. and lands West of the Appalachians. 

Popularity of the Incumbent: Moderate, with a 50% chance of reelection. Independents have mostly been pleased with Lewis, for defying his party by avoiding war with France and by refusing to sign an immigration bill. His own party is critical of Lewis for these reasons, including his hesitancy to use force on the Tax Rebels. Many Federalists, while supporting his campaign promises, believed that Lewis had few ideas on how to make these promises practical. Republicans have earned some respect for Lewis, but are using the tax rebellion as fuel to make Lewis a one-term president. Despite a likely challenge from both his party and the other party, Lewis has a shot at gaining another term, where he might be able to fulfill his promises. 

Party Power: Federalists lead in the Senate, but they are not dominant. The US House is split. Governorships are now overwhelmingly Republican, except in New England

@WVProgressive @Reagan04 @Sami @Kingthero @vcczar @Rodja @Conservative Elector 2 @LokiLoki22 @Lyly @TheMiddlePolitical

@Illinois Moderate

Will Federalist Samuel Lewis run for the presidency for a 2nd term? Who will aim to run for the president/vice presidency? [Please create a first and last name for your character, a home state, their office, their party (Fed or Rep), and some sort of response to Lewis's presidency that will allow us to see your potential platform. You have 24 hours to make a candidate. Please quote this entire message when responding to this or your nomination will not count.]

 
  •  

Former President Bunt endorses President Samuel Lewis. He and his son Sen. Alexander Bunt Jr. (1804?) promise to spare no effort in helping President Lewis win Virginia. 

 

 @Sami  @vcczar

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11 minutes ago, WVProgressive said:

Former President Bunt endorses President Samuel Lewis. He and his son Sen. Alexander Bunt Jr. (1804?) promise to spare no effort in helping President Lewis win Virginia. 

 

 @Sami  @vcczar

President Lewis speech:

I want once again to thanks President Bunt for his confidence.

We as Federalists can win still in 1800 if we work hard and we stay united, but we will also need to reinvent the party in the next years on many issues!

It's on that spirit that I plan to continue to lead. US is in peace with others countries, we're no longer threatened in the exterior, that's probably my diplomatical experience which made that, but we will need to make clear in the interior this time, that industrialization, jobs creations and modernization will be our top priorities alongside develloping our defence.

I want to make clear that our party will never forget this action of making the country first Bunt made.

And this would sceal the historical friendship between the Lewis and Bunt clans.

Whoever will be their sons and relatives, the Lewis will support the Bunts as long as it lasts within the same party.

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7 hours ago, vcczar said:

[OCC: We need at least one more Federalist and one more Republican to run for president]

Lee Yates of Tennessee declares his run for the Office of the Presidency

As a former fur trapper turned businessman, Lee Yates has grown tired of the status quo. He believes that the status quo is sometimes necessary, but should not be the sought over goal. 

 

He is a Republican that believes that President Lewis, while doing a modest job, has come short of putting a conclusion on many issues that face the country. Yates seeks to address these issues and bring many loose ends to their own conclusions.

 

His platform is rather vague, but his power is from his fuel to promote realistic and fair solutions to the country's problems.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Patine said:

OOC: Did taxes function on a percentage based tax code in the U.S. - or any nation on Earth - in the late 18th Century? I'm pretty sure that's not how taxation worked anywhere in the world back then.

((No. Traditionally, the vast majority of US Federal income has been from the tariffs and interstate consumption taxes, while income for states and municipalities was in the form of property taxes. Before the early 1900s, income tax as a concept was in a constitutional gray area and was still experimental. But it also made sense in a mostly rural nation (the US was not even 50% urban-based until the 1920 Census), whereas in today's more urban society, most people's wealth is through their wages, not land. One of the hold-overs of the old use of property taxes in the US is the way school funding works - towns with rich property-owners have better schools, rural and inner-city districts don't have a tax base to draw from, so have less money per student for schools. When public schools were first introduced, it was the latter 1800s and income taxes and other modern fiscal structures did not yet exist.))

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/Federal_taxes_by_type.pdf

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18 minutes ago, Lyly said:

((No. Traditionally, the vast majority of US Federal income has been from the tariffs and interstate consumption taxes, while income for states and municipalities was in the form of property taxes. Before the early 1900s, income tax as a concept was in a constitutional gray area and was still experimental. But it also made sense in a mostly rural nation (the US was not even 50% urban-based until the 1920 Census), whereas in today's more urban society, most people's wealth is through their wages, not land. One of the hold-overs of the old use of property taxes in the US is the way school funding works - towns with rich property-owners have better schools, rural and inner-city districts don't have a tax base to draw from, so have less money per student for schools. When public schools were first introduced, it was the latter 1800s and income taxes and other modern fiscal structures did not yet exist.))

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e0/Federal_taxes_by_type.pdf

(Ouh I totally agree it's a small mistake of choosed word from me you're completely correct with the financial term of it xD)

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10 hours ago, vcczar said:
Samuel Lewis's First Term Results 1797-1801:
Lewis's term did not see an increase in the size of the country. Economically, the country began to natural industrialize and trade increased through the Jay Treaty signed during Bunt's term. Congress advocated taxation to spur more growth, but Lewis was hesitant as a new tax rebellion consumed his entire term. Rather than enrage the rebels further, Lewis attempted to compromise, but the process took up the entire term. Ultimately, a minimal professional army and navy was established with a slight increase in tariff and taxation, but the bill freezes any future taxation for four years. Some saw this action as a benevolent compromise, some saw this as the actions of a weak executive, paralyzed by rebel forces. As Lewis's term ends, the rebels have not yet had the chance to react to this compromise. As such, Lewis's watered-down infrastructure bill is held up in Congress, blocking one of Lewis's campaign promise. Some see Lewis's presidency as one that had high ideals and goals, but were not exactly in tune with the economic and social tensions of the nation at the time. To Lewis's credit, he cleverly secured peace with France, ensuring another "Most Favored Trade Partner," (although, tensions with Britain now increase) and formally unshackling us from an unhealthy alliance. Lewis also continued Bunt's policy of paying tribute to the pirates, but notes that it will end once a navy is constructed. 
 
State of the Union Following Lewis's Decisions

National Strength: 3rd-tier country. The US now includes KY, VT, TN, with land cleared for settlement in future OH and IN. 

Military Strength: Weak, a professional army of 5,000 mean and a professional navy of 3 ships have been established, giving us some hope for the future, should be increase these numbers. 

Foreign Affairs: The British are still unofficially impressing our sailors into their navy, and tensions have increased now that we have given France, "Most Favored Trading Partner," a title which Britain now must share with France. To the credit of Britain, they have refrained from retaliating against us for now, allowing profitable trade to sail to both shores. The French have now stopped attacking our ships, and any threat from the French has gone as they turn their eyes back on Europe. We still give tribute to the Barbary Pirates to protect our ships from pirate attacks. Relations with Spain, a decaying empire, are positive. 

Military engagements: Our mostly-militia based force is currently defending against a tax rebellion in Pennsylvania, and a few militia men guard against potential Indian attacks in the frontier. A professional army is on its way to Pennsylvania. 

Economy: Weak-to-medium, but growing. We are still in debt, but we are on the pathway to paying it off. The outlook is hopeful, as revenue is coming in through tariff and taxation. Not much manufacturing and industrial production outside New England, which finally has at least three European-quality facility. Outlook for production growth is hopeful with Hamiltonian economic policies in place. The South is very agrarian, but profitable for the people. The agrarian sectors are critical of our current economic policies.

Trade: Protective Tariff allows for industrial growth in New England as well as revenue. The South opposes this tariff as it somewhat restricts their profits. International trade has grown because of the Jay Treaty with Britain and because of the recent Peace Treaty with France. About 80% of our international trade is via Britain, 10% is via France, and 10% via the rest of Europe. The Pirates are being paid tribute, so we are free from attacks. 

Budget: Small, and most revenue we gather is going to paying off the national debt. About 60% of our budget is going to military upkeep and creation and to protect the boarders and depend against the tax rebels. 20% is going to paying off the national debt. 20% is going to government upkeep. We have almost nothing for expansion at the moment, but we are hopeful that the trade and tariffs will make this possible within another term or two. 

Social Harmony: Federal taxation has caused a second rebellion in Pennsylvania, and there is some fear this could expand. Slight tension between Northern and Southern economies and world view. The South and West opposes the government's economic policies, but there is no threat of disunion at the moment. Some Northerners are upset about the Fugitive Slave Act as contradicts their Free State status. The Jay Treaty, which is wildly supported in New England, has increased tensions, most prominently in the South and West. The Sedition Acts signed by Lewis have emboldened Republicans, but they were relieved he did not sign all of the acts. 

Immigration: Limited. Congress slightly increased the time to become a citizen. We have a lenient policy.  Mostly Protestant Scots-Irish, Protestant French, and a few Protestant Germans arrive, but they do not yet pose a danger to our more English-descent Protestant Culture. Most of these immigrants are moving to settle the West. If they move to a city, it is to NYC or Philadelphia. Lewis defied his party by refusing to sign a restrictive immigration act. 

Mood of the people: Mostly positive and proud with mild grumblings in the South. and lands West of the Appalachians. 

Popularity of the Incumbent: Moderate, with a 50% chance of reelection. Independents have mostly been pleased with Lewis, for defying his party by avoiding war with France and by refusing to sign an immigration bill. His own party is critical of Lewis for these reasons, including his hesitancy to use force on the Tax Rebels. Many Federalists, while supporting his campaign promises, believed that Lewis had few ideas on how to make these promises practical. Republicans have earned some respect for Lewis, but are using the tax rebellion as fuel to make Lewis a one-term president. Despite a likely challenge from both his party and the other party, Lewis has a shot at gaining another term, where he might be able to fulfill his promises. 

Party Power: Federalists lead in the Senate, but they are not dominant. The US House is split. Governorships are now overwhelmingly Republican, except in New England

@WVProgressive @Reagan04 @Sami @Kingthero @vcczar @Rodja @Conservative Elector 2 @LokiLoki22 @Lyly @TheMiddlePolitical

@Illinois Moderate

Will Federalist Samuel Lewis run for the presidency for a 2nd term? Who will aim to run for the president/vice presidency? [Please create a first and last name for your character, a home state, their office, their party (Fed or Rep), and some sort of response to Lewis's presidency that will allow us to see your potential platform. You have 24 hours to make a candidate. Please quote this entire message when responding to this or your nomination will not count.]

 
  •  

(Ah, what the heck I'll jump in, unexpectant to win)

Name: William M. Aldridge (Born 1762)

State: PA

Party: Republican

Position: Senior Senator from Pennsylvania (Elected 1794)

Platform:

Senator Aldridge presents a moderate challenge to Governor Bigelow. 

  • No Nullification; Strong State Governments nonetheless. We must keep an ordered Hierarchy lest we descend into anarchy.
  • Low Taxes, but Tariffs are necessary in their current form
  • A Standing army and navy are fine ideas, but we should focus on paying down the debt, then once we are running a surplus we can make foreign excursions
  • Fought for the Jay Treaty in the Senate; neither France nor Britain have America first in their heart, nor should we have them first in ours. Whatever is most beneficial for the nation.
  • Pro-Expansion as it should increase our wealth

Senator Aldridge announces his bid for the Presidency in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I am honored to stand before you all today and announce my candidacy for the Presidency of the United States of America! It is a crucial moment that we as Americans must now embrace. We look to the turn of the 19th century with hope in our hearts and practicality in our minds. I have decided to run because I believe that Governor Bigelow presents a dangerous view of Republicanism to the nation. We must remain firm in our defense of the constitution, that means steadfastly opposing State Nullification of Federal Law! We stand here in the city which wrought forth the liberties we now cherish. Here forged were the bonds of a government never before established. The ironclad bonds of a Republic. Those bonds can never be allowed to separate, that is the purpose of the Federal Government, to bind us together like a sturdy iron beam. But we must recognize that each link of the chain is its own entity with its own rights, for that reason the Federal Government should delegate many powers to the state. The Lewis administration has greatly overstepped its boundaries with its insidious violations of the 1st Amendment, its tarnishing of the American Purpose. We stand on the crest of tomorrow, the wave of liberty sweeping across the content. In that spirit it is incumbent upon us to foster such liberty. That means supporting moderate tariffs to energize Industrial growth but also cutting domestic taxes. As it stands one of the greatest enslavers of American Possibility is the nation debt which must be first repaid before we take such great and heroic endeavors against all who might impugn our national integrity. I consider myself a defender of American ideals, and while the President is a defender of Britain and the Governor one of France, I say, let us decide with whom we can work to better our own national interests. Neither France nor Britain have us at the core of their actions, that is up to us. As I look out into this field, it has become apparent I am the only one with that vision. As we turn into the 19th century, the Lord guiding the greatest nation across the fields of time, it is imperative we defend our liberty, our ideals, our nation. I stand before you the candidate to do so. God Bless you all and God Bless America!

 

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((Good stuff! This is going to be another exciting election))

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(OOC: @Reagan04 loves too much to electorally challenge my characters in RP I'm flattered xD)

( @vcczar Are we enough? The 1800 election looks like to be a true 2000 with the current candidates!)

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OOC(out of character and out of curiosity):With no George Washington around how will our Capital be called?

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6 minutes ago, Rodja said:

OOC(out of character and out of curiosity):With no George Washington around how will our Capital be called?

OOC: Perhaps an election issue to being up?

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22 minutes ago, Rodja said:

OOC(out of character and out of curiosity):With no George Washington around how will our Capital be called?

OOC: maybe just The District of Columbia.

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22 minutes ago, WVProgressive said:

OOC: maybe just The District of Columbia.

OOC: Or Georgetown, the riverport that was there for quite a few years already, and, contrary to the beliefs of some Americans today, was not named after GEORGE Washington...

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Ok. The end of declaring candidacy has happened. I'll post the candidates formally and the election results when I next have a spare hour or two. This may occur tomorrow or Monday. 

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