Jump to content
270soft Forum
vcczar

US Presidential History RP

Recommended Posts

On 3/16/2018 at 3:56 PM, vcczar said:

A very interesting character. Pennsylvania might be the only state he could succeed in during the early Republic. His stance against slavery would probably isolate him, and make him a radical, even among radicals, at this time. This character is interesting because he's definitely going to have to play a long game. He probably won't see any real national support until he's 70; that is, unless the country changes. 

We shall see :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

@Rodja @vcczar (Only for @vcczar Cause wealth can be a faithful ally, and i presume he is more on the progressive front) Rodja most aligns with my own characters views, and he appreciates his effort to make our United States as one

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

 

President: Jefferson Blunt of Virginia

Vice President: Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania

 

Also note some people didn't quote the whole post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TheMiddlePolitical said:

@Rodja @vcczar (Only for @vcczar Cause wealth can be a faithful ally, and i presume he is more on the progressive front) Rodja most aligns with my own characters views, and he appreciates his effort to make our United States as one

[If you are voting, then please use the names of the characters, and not our names. This is a roleplay. ]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@everyone. Your vote does not count if you do not use the names of the characters we created, and if you do not quote the post about voting. This is so people can see that post and what you are responding to. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, vcczar said:

Did you make a character? If so, can you create it in the format that I use on page 1 of this thread? 

Euh, yes isn't it this one :P ?

On 17/03/2018 at 11:58 AM, Sami said:

If I may play :P

I would be up to play this kind of character

 

Name: Samuel Lewis Jr

State: New York

Political Party: Federalist => Moderate federalist, open to the confederates

Age: 37

Current Profession: Foreign Ambassador and Diplomat

Short term goal: To become Governor of New York (I would like that he seeks the primary then the nomination of his party for the gubernatorial election of NY).

Long term goal: To become Secretary of State then Vice President or President.

Background: Samuel Lewis Jr is the son of a rich family from NY, he grew up in prestigious schools and went to France and England in the duty to learn the nature of diplomacy. He speaks a fluent French from his daily -little- missions during the War in the support of Franklin's mission, then when the Constitution debate happened he became really interested by the ideas of the Confederalists.

However, he joined the Federalists due to the electorate of his state which is highly in favor of Federalism, and due to his personnal ambition, become Govenor of New York.

Despite his party, he stays one of the moderates who can agree with a really moderate Federacy.

For now, he is seeking the first days of the election he is running in.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know how I skipped you then. 

@Sami @CalebsParadox @Conservative Elector 2 @TheMiddlePolitical @Reagan04 @vcczar @WVProgressive @Rodja @Sunnymentoaddict

Amb. John Lewis, Jr of NY is also a presidential candidate. The only drawback to him is that he's a moderate on the Constitution, and that he's only 37. He has diplomatic experience. Feel free to change your vote, but continue to quote the original post, which I will now update. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. John Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

The wealthy, but imbecilic, Dudley Winthrop walks into the elector polling location 20 minutes late, having entered several wrong building while traveling along State Street, Boston. The usher greets Winthrop

Usher Trowbridge Dana:  "Ah, Mr. Winthrop. We've been waiting for you."

Mr. Dudley Winthrop: "How's that?"

Dana: "Why, the presidential election, sir. You are an elector."

Winthrop: "A what?"

Dana: "An elector. You will help choose the president."

Winthrop: "I am the president."

Dana: "Of your company, yes. But this is for our country."

Winthrop: "Have we not the governor?"

[At this point, Massachusetts Governor Lowell Cabot Lowell, seeing Winthrop struggle so embarrassingly, interceded]

Lowell: "(to Dana) Mr. Dana, I am sure you have other electors to attend to. (to Winthrop) Mr. Winthrop." 

Winthrop: "Mr. Governor. I am to elect you."

Lowell: "No. no. You are to elect the President of the United....nevermind. (Shows Dudley the ballot) You are to select two of these names." 

Winthrop: "Why! This fellow has stolen my name!"

Lowell: "No, sir. That is your name. You are on the ballot."

Winthrop: "I must certainly vote for myself!"

That said, Winthrop takes the ballot, but forgetting to vote for himself, he announces his support for "John Lewis of New York" and "Theodore Pennsylvania [sic]". The registrar, Mr. Wigglesworth Frothingham, records Samuel Lewis @Sami and Theodore Penn @Kingthero as the choices for the honorable Dudley Winthrop, a young scion of the Boston Brahmins. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...let's create a bit of chaos.

M Lewis votes for Himself (Lewis) as Pres then...Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey @CalebsParadox as VP!

I think a Confederalist VP is needed to keep our country united.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. John Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

The Elector from Pennsylvania,and young progressive Federalist Lawyer Dakota MikVinsky casts a ballot for Mr.Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, and Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey

"Any other of these candidates will keep us stuck in this age of racism and inequality" MikVinsky said at a newspaper interview with the Pitts Herald. Though I prefer Stockton and his views, Winthrop could make this country interesting,and could be a strong Vice leader. However as the leader? perhaps not. Stockton should lead our country. I believe I can personally work with him to bring new ideas and start our country out on the right foot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. John Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

Well...let's create a bit of chaos.

M Lewis votes for Himself (Lewis) as Pres then...Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey @CalebsParadox as VP!

I think a Confederalist VP is needed to keep our country united.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

with the quotation

Mr. Alexander William Blount casts his votes for Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia @Reagan04 and Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts  @vcczar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

Reverend Taylor casts his ballot for himself and Governor James Dayton! 

(I view our characters as similar but one is Southern and one is Northern, good ticket.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Reagan04 said:

Reverend Taylor casts his ballot for himself and Governor James Dayton! 

(I view our characters as similar but one is Southern and one is Northern, good ticket.)

Ah, I see @Reagan04 is not to going to live a little but play this one, like all the rest, firmly in the box - a practical clone character, only different in specific context, to all the rest. A disappointing lapse in creative potential... *shakes head sadly* :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Quote

 

 

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]


 

Mr.Timothy Stockton casts his vote for Mr.Dudley Withnorp from the great state of Massachusets for President and Mr.Theodore Penn of the great state of Pensylvannia for Vice President of these United States!  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Rodja said:
 

Mr.Timothy Stockton casts his vote for Mr.Dudley Withnorp from the great state of Massachusets for President and Mr.Theodore Penn of the great state of Pensylvannia for Vice President of these United States!  

 

MikVinski on Stockton not supporting,nor voting for his own self for president "I am shamed,when you put your own support behind a candidate,and they do not even have the self preservation to vote for themselves, is alarming, It feels as if your own vote is thrown out., I hereby withdraw my moral support from Mr. Stockton  though my Elector is already cast" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Patine said:

Ah, I see @Reagan04 is not to going to live a little but play this one, like all the rest, firmly in the box - a practical clone character, only different in specific context, to all the rest. A disappointing lapse in creative potential... *shakes head sadly* :P

I mean, he's casting his vote as Richard Taylor, who seems to be pretty Anti-Federalist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Joshen said:

I mean, he's casting his vote as Richard Taylor, who seems to be pretty Anti-Federalist

"Reverend" Richard Taylor, no less. I'm always about as wary of someone running for political office with the public - and flouted and promoted, as a big part of their political image - title of "Reverend" as I am when they use the title "Imam." Amazingly similar attitudes toward lawmaking, policy, judgement, and behaviour in office VERY often seem to come in both cases, for some strange reason. And attitudes that I, as a devout Christian, find inappropriate and disingenuous in a "Caesar."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

I will move on to the next chapter of our RP once everyone has a chance to vote. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2018 at 10:12 PM, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

In many ways, it is very fortunate that Governor James Dayton was selected as an elector for the state of New Jersey. His views are not overwhelmingly popular within the state, but his status as a hero and radical revolutionary has kept his popularity over the top, with his constituents adoring him. 

For many reasons, it was obvious who it was that Dayton would cast his vote for. He seeks to create a union of the those staunchly opposed to the federal government and to vote for like-minded individuals who are most likely to remain a face in politics for years after his own departure. His opposition to the central government would one day be observed as the first signs of political partisanship in The United States. 

His first vote would obviously go to himself, Governor John Dayton. He desires to lead the Antifederalists, and his status as a revolutionary hero alongside his fame would make him a natural leader of the Republic were he to win the election, though he knows that he will not. 

He second vote goes to Reverend John Taylor, who he believes to be a strong counterpart in the South who will be able to rally against the Northern establishment in due time.

(I redid my bio and goals, and it may be fairly important. @WVProgressive @Rodja
@vcczar@Reagan04@Sami@Kingthero@TheMiddlePolitical @Conservative Elector 2 @Sunnymentoaddict

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

William Isaac Thackery will cast his vote for President to Theodore Penn of PA, and his one Vice Presidential vote to fellow South Carolinian to John Jacob Jeckleheimerschmidt   Rutledge. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎3‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 11:12 PM, vcczar said:

Chapter 1 - December 15, 1788: The Presidential Election

Finally, the Constitution has secured the ratification necessary to embark on a new federal government for the United States. For the most part, national leaders endorse the constitution; although, some are hesitant to throw in full support without a bill of rights. For the new government to function, a new chief of executive must be elected by the presidential electors chosen by the state legislatures, and in rare cases, the propertied and free people of the more democratic states. 

However, who will lead in an America without a clear figure to rally behind (No Washington, no Franklin, no Adams, no Jefferson in this near-mirror universe)? 

For one, it seems necessary to hold the union together with a balanced ticket--a northerner and southerner--as president and vice president. Only a few names have been proposed for the presidency, all with some level of drawback:

  • Mr. Dudley Winthrop of Massachusetts, who is arguably the wealthiest man in New England, but also its stupidest and most insecure. Additionally, he is only 35 years old, the youngest possible age for the presidency. @vcczar
  • Judge Jefferson Bunt of Virginia, an experienced state judge who has long desired power. However, some believe he is more suited for the Supreme Court.  @WVProgressive
  • Rev. Richard Taylor of Virginia, a Southern Baptist preacher with no real apparent political experience. Some fear he may have a difficult time with the separation of Church and State. Additionally, he is only 38 years old. @Reagan04
  • Mr. Timothy Stockton of New Jersey, a lawyer that helped finance the Revolution. He is only 39 and those that know him say that he is more interested in an advisory capacity, than in holding political office at this time. @Rodja
  • Mr. Theodore Penn of Pennsylvania, a successful surveyor, who has been vocal about politics, but who has not himself held political office. He is also only 37 years old. 
  • Gov. James Dayton of New Jersey, the incumbent governor of New Jersey. While very experienced, he does not support the Constitution; therefore, he doesn't even believe in the office for which he has been proposed. Lastly, he is 64 years old, which some consider as potentially too old for the job. @CalebsParadox
  • Gen. John Jacob Rutledge of South Carolina, a Revolutionary War hero, who is currently retired from the military. While popular for his military service, Rutledge opposes the Constitution; therefore, he also opposes the new office of the presidency. Additionally, his strong pro-slavery views might make him more of a regional figure, than a national one. 
  • Amb. Samuel Lewis of New York, a skilled diplomat, but some fear he is too moderate on the Constitution, and too young at 37. 

The following figures are too young to be considered for the presidency: Alexander William Blount ( @Conservative Elector 2 ), William Isaiah Thackery ( @Sunnymentoaddict ), Dakota MikVinksy ( @TheMiddlePolitical )

Therefore, one of these seven men will become president, and one of these seven men will become vice president. Under the current rules of the Constitution. Each elector is given two votes, one for the president and one for the vice president.

Every player is one of the electors for their respective states. Who among these flawed men will be thrust into greatness? 

[To vote: quote this entire comment, and vote for two of the seven eligible candidates]

William Isaac Thackery will cast his vote for President to Theodore Penn of PA, and his one Vice Presidential vote to fellow South Carolinian to John Jacob Jeckleheimerschmidt   Rutledge. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×