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Patine

Alberta - 1935

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So, I've decided to start my Canadian scenario set with the Alberta 1935 election - statistically the biggest political upset in a single election in North American history. The various parties are as follows:

-United Farmers of Alberta under Premier Richard Reid (incumbent)

-Alberta Social Credit Party under Reverend William "Bible Bill" Aberhart

-Alberta Liberal Party under William Howson

-Conservative Party of Alberta under David Duggan

-Communist Party of Alberta under Jan Lakeman

-Dominion Labour Party under Fred White

-Independents (No leader, but the most prominent candidate being John Mackintosh)

-Independent-Liberal  (sole candidate Lucien Boudreau)

-United Front (sole candidate L Robbins)

-Independent-Conservative (sole candidate A S McRae)

-Independent-Labour (sole candidate Robert Parkyn)

-Reconstruction (sole candidate Elsie Wright)

Issues:

Agriculture
Banking Control
Economy
Education
Federal Relations
Industry
Infrastructure
Media Control
MLA Recall
Natural Resources
Prosperity Certificates
Religion
Taxes
Unions
U.S. Relations
Utilities
Women's Rights
Working Conditions

 

More coming up shortly.

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God, I just do not want to imagine the platform of the farmer party xD

How is it to live in the most right-wing province of Canada :)?

I will try to help you

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@JDrakeify @willpaddyg @daons @LegolasRedbard @Prussian1871 @wolves @SirLagsalott @michaelsdiamonds @victorraiders @Patine @Falcon @jnewt @President Garrett Walker @Reagan04 @Conservative Elector 2 @SeanFKennedy @vcczar @jvikings1 @harveyrayson2 @lizarraba @TheMiddlePolitical @CalebsParadox @MrPrez @msc123123 @NYrepublican  @RI Democrat @servo75  @Presidentinsertname  @ThePotatoWalrus @Sunnymentoaddict @TheLiberalKitten @Quebecois @avatarmushi @Sami @WVProgressive @Kingthero @Lyly @President Trenton Adams

So, this initial project has already been expanded to all the Alberta general elections from 1909 to (and including) 1935, plus an update and upgrade of the official 1905 scenario from Alberta Premier Forever 2008. I decided to do this today instead of my initial plan where I, whose RL first name is Patrick, would make a sermon against evil and corruption in the world and (attempt to) drive all the snakes off the forum... :P

On ‎2018‎-‎03‎-‎03 at 4:18 AM, Sami said:

God, I just do not want to imagine the platform of the farmer party xD

How is it to live in the most right-wing province of Canada :)?

I will try to help you

Actually, Edmonton, the capital city, where I live, and a city in the far south of the Province called Lethbridge aren't actually nearly as conservative as much of the rest of the Province, though Calgary is amazingly conservative, on average, for a city over a million anywhere in Canada OR the United States. But any aid you can offer would be appreciated.

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19 minutes ago, Patine said:

@JDrakeify @willpaddyg @daons @LegolasRedbard @Prussian1871 @wolves @SirLagsalott @michaelsdiamonds @victorraiders @Patine @Falcon @jnewt @President Garrett Walker @Reagan04 @Conservative Elector 2 @SeanFKennedy @vcczar @jvikings1 @harveyrayson2 @lizarraba @TheMiddlePolitical @CalebsParadox @MrPrez @msc123123 @NYrepublican  @RI Democrat @servo75  @Presidentinsertname  @ThePotatoWalrus @Sunnymentoaddict @TheLiberalKitten @Quebecois @avatarmushi @Sami @WVProgressive @Kingthero @Lyly @President Trenton Adams

So, this initial project has already been expanded to all the Alberta general elections from 1909 to (and including) 1935, plus an update and upgrade of the official 1905 scenario from Alberta Premier Forever 2008. I decided to do this today instead of my initial plan where I, whose RL first name is Patrick, would make a sermon against evil and corruption in the world and (attempt to) drive all the snakes off the forum... :P

Actually, Edmonton, the capital city, where I live, and a city in the far south of the Province called Lethbridge aren't actually nearly as conservative as much of the rest of the Province, though Calgary is amazingly conservative, on average, for a city over a million anywhere in Canada OR the United States. But any aid you can offer would be appreciated.

@Patine I am so ignorant of the provinces of Canada. If you had to pair each province with a US state that it is somewhat akin to, what state would you pair with the each Canadian province, and why?

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8 minutes ago, vcczar said:

@Patine I am so ignorant of the provinces of Canada. If you had to pair each province with a US state that it is somewhat akin to, what state would you pair with the each Canadian province, and why?

You know, as much as it annoys me, I'd have to pair Alberta with Texas. It's economy is traditionally based on oil and cattle, with a growing recent tech industry, and, outside two cities, tends to be very politically and socially conservative (by Canadian standards - not outright as bad as Texas). I'd consider close comparisons for the others, but British Columbia is pretty close in many ways to Washington and Oregon, and, in fact, the those two States and that Province are informally and unofficially lumped into an ecological and geo-political region called Cascadia.

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7 minutes ago, Patine said:

You know, as much as it annoys me, I'd have to pair Alberta with Texas. It's economy is traditionally based on oil and cattle, with a growing recent tech industry, and, outside two cities, tends to be very politically and socially conservative (by Canadian standards - not outright as bad as Texas). I'd consider close comparisons for the others, but British Columbia is pretty close in many ways to Washington and Oregon, and, in fact, the those two States and that Province are informally and unofficially lumped into an ecological and geo-political region called Cascadia.

I've heard to comparison of Alberta to Texas as well. I'm interested in how you compare the other provinces when you can do so. 

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3 hours ago, Patine said:

You know, as much as it annoys me, I'd have to pair Alberta with Texas. It's economy is traditionally based on oil and cattle, with a growing recent tech industry, and, outside two cities, tends to be very politically and socially conservative (by Canadian standards - not outright as bad as Texas). I'd consider close comparisons for the others, but British Columbia is pretty close in many ways to Washington and Oregon, and, in fact, the those two States and that Province are informally and unofficially lumped into an ecological and geo-political region called Cascadia.

Texas was settled by first Spaniards, then Scot-irish from the Appalachian region, then later Germans. And they helped create a unique political identity for the state. Who were the main early white/non-native(First Nations) to settle Alberta? This can give us a feel of how the ridings lean.  

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1 hour ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

Texas was settled by first Spaniards, then Scot-irish from the Appalachian region, then later Germans. And they helped create a unique political identity for the state. Who were the main early white/non-native(First Nations) to settle Alberta? This can give us a feel of how the ridings lean.  

British Isles descended (and even a significant number directly from the British Isles, in Alberta's case, given British Subjects could freely immigrate to Canada back then, as Canada was a British Dominion, unlike in the U.S., where they were legally foreign-born Europeans bound by American immigration laws), Metis (those of mixed Native and European ancestry, who had a special legal status separate from either European-Canadians or First Nations, and still do), and a large proportion of ethnic Ukrainians (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba have, statistically, the highest populations of ethnic Ukrainians and their direct descendants of any polities in the world outside the Former USSR and Warsaw Pact nations). Also, a notable number in early days of French Canadians from Quebec, but usually mostly in certain settlements, such as St. Albert, Lac la Biche, and Legal, and a large group of Mormons who migrated from the U.S. into southern Alberta towns like Cardston and Taber.

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4 hours ago, Sami said:

@Patine

This link will be usefull

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberta_general_election,_1935

And indeed it was a major shit in Alberta but not as much as the way independentism raised in Quebec during the 70's :P

Or the shutdown of the Tories in 1993 xD

I say major upset in that one party (the Social Credit), just created for the first time the year before the election with no incumbent seats or political experience would win a large majority government their first election, hold eight more large majorities in Alberta, keeping power in the Provincial government straight until 1971, spawn a Federal branch at the later Canadian Federal election in 1935, which would hold seats in the House of Commons until 1980 (except for a wipe-out period in the Parliament of 1958-1962), hold the British Columbia Provincial Government from 1952-1972 and 1975-1991, have a very notable Quebec branch (the Rallie Creditiste), led by such leaders as Louis Evens, Real Caouette, and Fabian Roy, and even hold several seats in the Saskatchewan and Manitoba Legislative Assemblies in the 1940's to 1970's, and make the college try in Ontario and New Brunswick Provincial elections, and have seven-term Alberta Premier (and the second longest serving Premier in Canadian history) Earnest Manning (the father of Reform Party co-founder and first leader Preston Manning) be made, after his retirement as Premier in 1968, the first Canadian Senator not chosen from the Liberal Party or the Old Conservative/Progressive Conservative/New Conservative Parties), all having roots on the momentum of the "majority out of nowhere victory" in the Alberta 1935 Provincial election, whereas, the incumbent United Farmers of Alberta government, who had a majority government going into the election, and three previous ones under their belt, going back to their first electoral victory in 1921, had EVERY incumbent member lose their seat, without exception, and, though they remained a farmers' lobbying and advocacy group, wheat pool, and agricultural good provider coop and vendor outlet chain, which they do to this day, they never entered politics under their own name and label again after that election. THAT'S the kind of upset I'm talking about which was unmatched by either of the two events you gave in those extreme statistics...

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What do you have the Socreds ideology like? They are a bit syncretic, or fascist, at the start. Aberharte spoke kindly about socialism and communism on occasion.  He himself was not anti-Semitic but some in the party were. They definitely went for a more left wing government at the very start, but Ernest Manning moved that over to (and really helped invent) social conservatism. Quite an odd evolution.

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Calgary reminds me a lot of Oklahoma.

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5 hours ago, uberdipper said:

What do you have the Socreds ideology like? They are a bit syncretic, or fascist, at the start. Aberharte spoke kindly about socialism and communism on occasion.  He himself was not anti-Semitic but some in the party were. They definitely went for a more left wing government at the very start, but Ernest Manning moved that over to (and really helped invent) social conservatism. Quite an odd evolution.

The platform used by Aberhart focuses on his main planks to beat the Great Depression - taking control of provincial banks, social credit "monetary reform," initially according to C.H. Douglas, and his infamous "prosperity certificates," but also begins to strongly assert his vision of mandatory "Christian ethics" in government, especially in the wake of Brownlee sex scandal, and his mandatory "media rebuttal" idea. There's no indication he actually campaigned on much more than that in 1935.

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@uberdipper or anyone else who thinks they may be able to dig this up - I'm having a hard time finding the date the writ was dropped for the 1935 Alberta general election. The actual election day is easy enough to find, but the date of the writ is kind of needed too...

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On 3/17/2018 at 8:29 PM, Patine said:

You know, as much as it annoys me, I'd have to pair Alberta with Texas. It's economy is traditionally based on oil and cattle, with a growing recent tech industry, and, outside two cities, tends to be very politically and socially conservative (by Canadian standards - not outright as bad as Texas). I'd consider close comparisons for the others, but British Columbia is pretty close in many ways to Washington and Oregon, and, in fact, the those two States and that Province are informally and unofficially lumped into an ecological and geo-political region called Cascadia.

It seems like the B.C. Liberals are more consistently successful than the federal Conservatives in British Columbia. Have they been able to hold onto a portion of the center with their policies and/or their name, such that a number of federal Liberal and/or NDP voters back them in provincial elections?

BTW Patine, is there any way Rachel Notley isn't a dead woman walking now that the Tories and Wildrose have united? (And is there any chance there might finally be a United Non-Conservative Party of Alberta?)

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2 hours ago, RI Democrat said:

It seems like the B.C. Liberals are more consistently successful than the federal Conservatives in British Columbia. Have they been able to hold onto a portion of the center with their policies and/or their name, such that a number of federal Liberal and/or NDP voters back them in provincial elections?

BTW Patine, is there any way Rachel Notley isn't a dead woman walking now that the Tories and Wildrose have united? (And is there any chance there might finally be a United Non-Conservative Party of Alberta?)

First question, in B.C. and Quebec, unlike Federally and in the other Canadian Provinces (and the Yukon), the Liberal Parties in those two Provinces ARE the main centre-right parties, and are closer to the Australian Liberal Party in nature. The reason is because the Union Nationale in Quebec and the Social Credit Party in B.C., both holding decades-long right-wing governments, both quickly imploded in short periods of time, and in both cases the Provincial Liberals filled the gap. The B.C. Conservatives largely ATTEMPT to play on the Federal Conservatives, but they don't do so as well as the Saskatchewan Party or even, judging by it's growth before the merger, the Wildrose Alliance do by largely on and emulating the Federal Conservatives.

Second, not all prominent PC's joined the UCP. Quite a few of them alienated by the sharp shift to the Right, led by former Mayor of Edmonton and briefly cabinet minister under Prentice's Government, Stephen Mandel (whom I made the mistake of voting for the first time he ran for Mayor here), have joined the Alberta Party, which had won a single seat in 2015, while a fair number of former PC, Wildrose Alliance, and Social Credit members formed the Reform Party of Alberta with a very different, but equally, right-wing, all things considered, vision. I have heard NO talk, whatsoever, of an NDP-Liberal merger or even electoral alliance, however.

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1 hour ago, Patine said:

First question, in B.C. and Quebec, unlike Federally and in the other Canadian Provinces (and the Yukon), the Liberal Parties in those two Provinces ARE the main centre-right parties, and are closer to the Australian Liberal Party in nature. The reason is because the Union Nationale in Quebec and the Social Credit Party in B.C., both holding decades-long right-wing governments, both quickly imploded in short periods of time, and in both cases the Provincial Liberals filled the gap. The B.C. Conservatives largely ATTEMPT to play on the Federal Conservatives, but they don't do so as well as the Saskatchewan Party or even, judging by it's growth before the merger, the Wildrose Alliance do by largely on and emulating the Federal Conservatives.

I knew the background about the B.C. Liberals (though I wasn't aware that the Quebec Liberals were considered center-right - I thought that was the Coalition Avenir Quebec's territory). What I meant is that the B.C. Liberals seem to get a higher percentage of the vote in provincial elections than the federal Conservatives do in B.C. in federal elections. Is that because right-leaning federal Liberal voters prefer them to the NDP in the provincial context?

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