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vcczar

2nd Political Party Board Game Playthrough

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I'm doing another round of playthrough, since I've made a lot of change. 

Year Card: 1960 

Era Card: Cold War Era [Bonus for +1 in Intervention; M in Social Welfare/Self-Reliance; M in Pro-Immigrant/Nativist; M in Labor/Business; M in Minority Rights/Majority Rule; +1 in Tradition]

Republican set up position: 

Republicans have the presidency (Eisenhower) and the majority of the justices, even though the court is overwhelmingly liberal (Eisenhower appoint two liberal judges and three swing judges; FDR and Truman appointed three liberal and one conservative judge). On the game board, they have an advantage in New England and the Great Plains, and split the Mountain States with Democrats. 

If the election were today, Republicans would earn 89 points for the game [Scoring will be elaborated at the end of the playthrough].

Republican Platform: +1 in Intervention, Nativist, Business, States Rights, Tradition; M in Protection/Free Trade, Social Welfare/Self-Reliance, Minority Rights/Majority Rule

Republican Enthusiasm: 3/7 [Giving them two political points to spend each turn] *Political points can be used for a variety of reasons, but primarily to boost chances of victory in any election 

Republican Unity: 2/3 [The higher the unity, the more cohesive the party is on voting on legislation and supporting or opposing the president]

Republican Strategy: Their number one goal to get more governors, US Reps and Senators, which is a daunting task, and may require a long term strategy. They could force Democrats to isolate some of their supporters, particularly in the South. To do this, Republicans would have to shift right, while keeping Democratic unity as low as possible. Meanwhile, Republicans need to really improve their party's enthusiasm, while decreasing the enthusiasm of the Democrats. Alternatively, Republicans could attempt to maintain their traditional dominance in the North, which may mean adopting a more pro-immigrant and pro-labor platform. This may be risky, as it would involve battling Democrats in areas where they are already established. 

Democratic set up position:

Democrats control an overwhelming majority of both Houses of Congress--66 Senators and 65% of the US House. They also have the majority of the governorships. They have leads in the following six regions: Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Upper South, Deep South, Texas, and the West Coast. They split the Mountain States with Republicans. 

If the election were today, Democrats would earn 138 points for the game, which means they would the round, keeping their score minus the opponents score (49 points) toward the overall score for the game. [Scoring will be elaborated at the end of the playthrough]. 

Democratic Platform: +1 in Intervention, Social Welfare, Pro-immigrant, Labor; M in Protection/Free Trade, Minority Rights/Majority Rule, Federal Prerogative/States Rights, Reform/Tradition.

Democratic Enthusiasm: 4/7 [Giving them 3 Political Points to spend each turn]

Democratic Unity: 1/3

Democratic Strategy: Democrats merely need to hold their massive leads in Congress and hope that this transitions to taking over the White House. In order to maintain this, they may need to figure out a plan to keep their Liberal and Conservative supporters together. Alternatively, they could take the risk of choosing one side over the other. The lowest risk is to drop the South and hope a move to the Left will keep a tighter grip on the more populated states. The Democratic Party's greatest weakness right now is their low unity score. 

1960 Elections:

  • Presidential Election
  • US House Elections
  • Gubernatorial Elections in AZ, LA, ME, MA, MN, MO, MT, NE, NM, TX, VT, WA, WV, WI
  • Senate Elections in AL, AK, AR, CO, DE, GA, ID, IL, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MA, MI, MN, MS, MT, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NC, OK, OR, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, WV, WY

Current Presidential Election projection

ALMOST THE ENTIRE MAP IS CONTESTABLE, as neither party has Presidential support higher than +2 except in a few states:

Safe Republican: 48 EVs (ME, VT, SD, NE, KS, IA, OK, AZ)

Safe Democrat: 61 EVs (MA, RI, MS, AL, LA, GA)

Contestable states: 428 EVs (13 states are true battleground states, as they don't lean one way or the other):

Most likely states to see campaign action: NY, PA, OH, CA, MI, IL, TX for presidential election; TX, MA, MO, WI, MN for governor elections; IL, KY, MA, MI, MN, NJ, NC, TN, TX, VA for Senate elections. This means that, overall, TX (3x), MI (2x), MA (2x), MN (2x) are likely to see a lot of Political Points thrown their way, as will NY, PA, CA, since they have the most EVs and could go to either party. 

After the set up, the player that controls the president will pass out the Hand Cards.

Next: Hand Cards dealt and opening phase. 

I'll tag @Patine @Caprice @ThePotatoWalrus @Reagan04 @NYrepublican @Sunnymentoaddict @Wiw since they seem interested in this. 

 

 

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In a weird way, the initial map encourages both parties to pursue  a more conservative platform, since many of the states holding elections would most likely not elect a McCarthy type of liberal. Be interesting to see who would adjust their platform just enough to win the more conservative(and Senate rich) states. 

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14 minutes ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

In a weird way, the initial map encourages both parties to pursue  a more conservative platform, since many of the states holding elections would most likely not elect a McCarthy type of liberal. Be interesting to see who would adjust their platform just enough to win the more conservative(and Senate rich) states. 

The era cards and updated region cards will change this up in every election. It will show ideological shifts. 

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Playthrough continued...

Republican player deals out hand cards (since Eisenhower is president). Only one card can be placed per turn, and all of them must be played before election day. If a player fails to play them all by election day or has too many cards on election day, then a loss of enthusiasm results for each card not played. 

Democratic player gets (card names will likely change):

  • Economy gain card [Your party gains +1 enthusiasm; +2 if you control the presidency. If the other player controls the presidency, then that player gets +1 as well]
  • Block influence in a state [For this election cycle neither party can influence a state's voters]
  • Spy Card [Point to an opponents card to reveal what they have; you have the option of trading for that card]
  • Diminished Influence on Legislation [Opponent's unity is at 50% on next legislative vote]
  • Delay legislation [Minority party can delay legislation until next election cycle; if you control the speaker, then you discard the card with no negative or positive effect. Do not draw another card.]

Republican player gets:

  • Gaffe [Opponent's party receives -1 negatives in every election in a single state; place this card as close to the state of your choice]
  • Supreme Court Justice resigns/dies [New Justice is selected; roll the dice to determine which justice is replaced]
  • Bad campaigning [Your opponents presidential campaigning is grossly mismanaged in an entire region, resulting in -1 for that reason for the presidential election only. Place this card on that region]
  • Exert presidential influence [Use the president's influence on legislation, giving your party total unity, and the other party -1 in unity]
  • Superb campaigning [Excellent campaign managing results in +1 for an entire region in the next presidential election]

Up next: Turn 1- Early Executive Phase

 

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Turn 1 - Early Executive Phase

As the Republicans control the presidency, they receive all early executive phase cards for 1960:

  • Mutual Security Treaty with Japan [Support +1 in Pro-Intervention states; Oppose +1 in Pro-Isolation states and a loss of unity, enthusiasm and roll for platform change one toward +1 Isolationism. If supported, the Treaty goes to the Senate for ratification with the same positive and negative qualities for support and opposition. Pass the card to the Speaker's player if the President supports it. If the president does not support the Treaty, then the opposing party can save the card until their president is in office. If the president supports it, but the Senate does not, then the president's party can choose to bring the Treaty back up in the next round.]
    • Republican President supports the treaty; and the card goes to the Democratic-controlled Senate for ratification during the legislative session. 
  • Civil Rights Protests in the South [The president has multiple options. He can intervene on behalf of the Pro-Civil Rights faction. He can sympathize with the Pro-Civil Rights Faction. He can take a neutral stance. He can sympathize with the Anti-Civil Rights faction. He can intervene on behalf of the Anti-Civil Rights Faction. The two extreme options result in a loss of unity, enthusiasm, a move of +1 in the platform towards the ideology of the faction supported, and a loss of -1 support  in states opposed to the faction supported and a +1 in the states favoring the supported faction. The sympathizing stances allow for a roll to decide the platform shifts and whether or not support is lost or gained. The Neutral stance results a roll for a loss -1 enthusiasm, but a roll for a gain of +1 in unity].
    • Republican President takes a neutral stance. Dice are rolled for a loss of enthusiasm and for a gain in unity, both dice results leave these at the status quo. 
  • Troop Increase to Vietnam [Support shifts the platform to +1 intervention and allows for a roll for an enthusiasm gain and a roll for +1 support in states desiring intervention. Opposing an increase in troops shifts the platform to -1 isolationism and allows for a roll for enthusiasm loss and a roll for +1 support in states desiring isolation.]
    • Republican President supports an increase of troops. The two dice rolls land in his party's favor, resulting in an enthusiasm gain for next round, and a support gain in the intervention states.
  • U-2 Spy Plane Incident [Admit responsibility, resulting in a -1 loss of enthusiasm, but +1 support in intervention states, and a guaranteed failure (discard) of the next Treaty card involving the Soviets. Stay quiet and let the Soviets dictate who is responsible, resulting in a roll for a -1 loss of enthusiasm. Deny responsibility and spin the incident against the Russians, resulting in a +1 in enthusiasm, -1 in unity, +1 in intervention states, -1 in isolation states, a move to +2 intervention on the platform, a guaranteed failure (discard) of all Soviet Treaty cards for as long as president's party controls the presidency, and a roll to decide if a war begins with Russia. If a war occurs, this card is placed on the board, and each year a roll is made to determine the success or failure of the war with potential dire consequences.]
    • Republican President stays quiet and let the Soviets dictate who they think is responsible. A dice roll results in a loss of enthusiasm gained in the previous [Historically, this is what Eisenhower did, and Khrushchev allowed Eisenhower to save face by suggesting Eisenhower didn't know that the U-2 pilot had flown into Russia. Previous to this, Eisenhower was considering resigning from the presidency as the incident depressed him so much]. 

Both parties can play one of their hand cards, as well as all of their Political Points for this round. [Hand cards and PP can be played as the President makes executive decisions, but for simplicity I won't mix it up in this playthrough]:

Republican, as the President's party, moves first:

  • He decides to spend his two PP by influencing the US House elections, and by influencing MI presidential election. [PP Markers are placed in these areas on the board]. 
  • He plays his Bad Campaigning hand card in the Midwest, giving Democrats a -1 in this region for this election cycle. The card is place next to that region on the board. 

The Democratic player moves next:

  • He decides to spend his three PP by rolling for unity, influencing TX and NY in the presidential elections. [PP Markers are placed on TX and NY. Dice are rolled for an increase in unity, but this fails.]
  • He plays his Block Influence in a State Card in Texas [All prior influence, including the PP marker in TX remains, but not future markers may be added. This pretty much saves Texas from Republicans for this election, since Democrats had narrow support and the PP marker increased that support, and now Republicans can only hope to take the state with platform shifts.]

Up Next: Turn 2 - Early Legislative Phase

 

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@Patine @Caprice @ThePotatoWalrus @Reagan04 @NYrepublican @Sunnymentoaddict @Wiw 

I just posted Turn - 1. Since it does take me forever to type these out, I'll probably just do one turn a day. When I finish a round (the end of the 1960 election), I'll probably ask everyone for feedback. Depending on the feedback, I may carry on to the 1962 mid-term. 

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Playthrough continued...

Turn 2 - Early Legislative Phase

The Democratic Player controls the Speaker and therefore holds the Legislative Cards. Those marked "Early" must be considered in this phase. Additionally, any Executive Decision the require a Senate or House vote must be completed in the legislative phase. The Speaker has the option of delaying legislation for one legislative phase.  The speaker has only one Legislative Card for the Early phase, as well as the Mutual Security Treaty with Japan card from the executive phase. 

Democratic Speaker opts to let the vote on the Treaty begin, and then on the Civil Rights Act of 1960. As this requires only a Senate vote, the player that controls the US Senate holds the cards, and can opt to delay for one session. Democrats also control the Senate. Democratic Majority Leader wants to vote. 

  • Vote for Ratification of the Mutual Security Treaty with Japan (given to the Senate Majority Party--Democratic Player)
    • Democratic Majority Leader intends for his party to vote "Yea" (1/3 unity; thus, likely to have 75% of his party's support)
    • Republican Minority Leader intends for his party to vote, "Yea"  (2/3 unity; thus, likely to have 90% of his party's support)
    • Opposition has no shot at blocking ratification
    • Treaty is ratified; both parties get +1 in pro-intervention states,, but no change is made on the board, since their support cancels each other out. 
  • Vote on The Civil Rights Act of 1960 (given to the Speaker's Party--Democratic Player)
    • Support for this Act gives -1 unity (to Democrats only), -1 in Majority Rule States, +1 in Minority Rights States, and allows for a dice roll towards +1 Minority Rights; Opposition for this Act gives -1 Enthusiasm, -1 in Minority Rights States, +1 in Majority Rule States, +1 in States Rights States, and platform move to +1 Majority Rule. 
    • Democrats intent to support it. (1/3 unity; thus, likely to have 75% of this party's support)
    • Republicans also intent to support it. (2/3 unity; thus, likely to have 90% of his party's support). 
    • Opposition has no shot at blocking passage. 
    • The card goes to the Senate Majority leader (also the Democratic player)
    • The bill will obviously pass with both parties favoring it, so no dice roll is necessary after players both voice "yea"
    • Both parties must roll the dice to see if their platform move towards +1 Minority Rights; Both players roll the dice, keeping their current platform. [Note: I may change the rule to where the party can opt to move their platform, but have to roll the dice only if they don't want to move it.]
    • As it has passed both Houses of Congress, the card is handed to the President's Party (Republican), who must sign or veto the bill. Signing the bill gives the president's party a +1 in Minority Rights States, and a roll for -1 in States Rights States; Vetoing the bill does the opposite. If the bill is overridden, then his party loses -1 enthusiasm. The Republican President, even if he wanted to veto it, will probably see his veto overriden. He signs the bill.
  • Political Points and Hand Cards
    • Both parties could have played their PP and Hand Cards at any time during this phase, but for simplicity's sake, I'll again handle them all at once. 
      • Republican Player uses one of his two PP on the US House, and another on NY presidential polls. 
      • Democratic Player uses his three PP on CA presidential poll, NC presidential poll, Florida presidential poll. 
      • Republican Player plays his Supreme Court Justice Dies/Resigns Card. 
        • A dice is rolled to see which justice is removed. It is the first Justice (Chief Justice), a Republican-nominated Liberal (RL). 
        • The President is allowed to nominate a judge of any ideology. [The Senate is allowed to block one nomination. If the nomination is blocked, the president must pick a judge of another ideology.]  The Republican Player realizing a RC (Conservative) would be blocked, and not wanting another RL on the court, opts to nominate a RS (Swing), since a block by Congress would allow him to place a Conservative with his next choice. President nominates a RS justice.
        • The Democratic Senate Majority Leader confirms the RS judge, rather than block it and risk a RC. 
      • Democratic Player use his Spy Card
        • Democratic player points to a remaining card in the opponents hand.
        • The card is the Gaffe Card. He can then decide to trade one of his cards (Spy Card not allowed, since it was just used) for that card. 
        • Democratic Player trades his Delay Legislation Card for the Gaffe Card. 

As we haven't any early 1960 Judicial Cards, Turn 3 is skilled. 

Up Next: Turn 4 (since Turn 3 is skipped) -- Party Conventions

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Playthrough continued...

Turn 4 - Party Conventions

Both parties hold Conventions and both players are allows to use one or more of their PP to influence the election. Starting in 1972, influencing the election leads a dice roll, which could result in scandal. Conventions still determined elections prior to 1972, when every state finally had primaries/caucuses for the first time. In this game, the President's Party will hold the first primary. Generally, a party will have a choice of candidates. If there isn't a strong primary challenger, historically speaking, then the runaway frontrunner will be the only candidate. 

  • Republican Convention
    • Republican player opts not to use next round's PP for convention influence, especially considering there is only one candidate. 
    • Richard Nixon is the sole Republican option for 1960. [Nixon moves his platform one toward +1 Self-Reliance, +1 Intervention, and +2 Business, if the platform isn't already there. Unity is moved to 2/3. +1 support in CA and in the Great Plains and Midwest states. Enthusiasm and Unity is -1 if Nixon does not select a VP from New England or Mid-Atlantic.]
    • Republican Player must then select a VP from one of the regions, allowing +1 region support. Nixon selects a New England VP, specifically from MA. This gives him +1 in New England, and an extra +1 for MA. 
  • Democratic Convention
    • Democratic players opts not to use next round's PP for convention influence. 
    • Democrats have a 70% chance of nominating John F. Kennedy and a 30% chance of nominating Lyndon B. Johnson. [Kennedy moves his platform back to the 1960 default position, if it isn't currently there. However, it also moves to +1 Reform. Unity is moved to 1/3, Enthusiasm +1, unless a Deep South or Texas VP is not selected, in which case enthusiasm is -1. Kennedy gives +1 support in MA, MD, LA, CT, RI, NY, IL, PA and -1 in the Deep South (except LA), and -1 in Texas. ] [Johnson, who is not yet a Civil Rights icon, moves the platform towards +1 Majority Rule, +1 States Rights, and the middle of Business/Labor and Pro-Immigrant/Nativist. Unity is moved to 2/3, but enthusiasm goes to -1, unless a New Englander is made VP. Johnson gives +2 in TX, +1 in the Deep South and +1 in the Upper South, and -1 in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, West Coast, and New England.]
    • A dice is rolled. LBJ wins an upset over JFK!!!!
    • LBJ selects a New Englander, specifically from MA as his VP, allowing +1 in that region, and an extra +1 in MA.

Up next: Turn 5 -- Late Executive Phase  

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Turn 4 -- Continued [[I forgot about the Campaign Issue Cards]]

Both parties must respond to the three major campaign issues:

  • Missile Gap Between the USA and USSR
    • Option 1: Tell the people that you promise to close the missile gap; Option 2: Tell the people that the missile gap is a myth. [Option 1 gains support in intervention states + enthusiasm +1, and a shift towards +1 intervention; Option 2 gains support in isolation states and shifts one toward +1 isolation.]
    • Nixon and Johnson both use option 1. 
  • JFK's Catholicism 
    • Option 1: Support JFK's faith, asserting that someone's faith shouldn't impact a candidates support; Option 2: Attack JFK's faith, state to the people that America is a Protestant nation, and that we can't risk the Pope running the country. [Option 1: +1 in pro-immigrant states and -1 in nativist; Option 2: +1 in nativist states and =1 in pro-immigrant states (-1 unity if Democrat)]
    • Nixon selects option 1; Johnson option 2
  • MLK in Jail
    • Option 1: Federal Government should intervene and release MLK from jail; Option 2: It isn't the government's role to intervene, as it is the state's prerogative. [Option 1: +1 in Minority Rights States, +1 in Fed Prerog States, -1 in Majority Rule States, -1 in States rights states, move one toward +1 federal prerogative; Option 2: The reverse of option 1 effects]
    • Nixon and Johnson select option 2. 

Turn 5 -- Late Executive Phase

The Republican player controls the presidency; therefore, he is handed the late phase executive cards. 

  • Endorse Nixon
    • Historically, Eisenhower gave a very lukewarm endorsement of Nixon. Here are the executive options. 1) Enthusiastically endorse Nixon [Enthusiasm +1] 2) Lukewarm endorsement of Nixon [No effect + change one platform stances back to the 1960 default] 3) Refuse to endorse Nixon [Enthusiasm -1, unity -1, change the entire platform stances back to the default]. 
    • Republican President endorses Nixon enthusiastically. 
  • Arms Race in Outer Space
    • 1) Increase funding for NASA, promising to work to defeat the Soviets in the Space Race [+1 in intervention states, -1 in States Rights state, +1 enthusiasm; 2) Cut back on NASA funding, as the Space Race is a waste of money. [+1 in States Rights states, +1 in isolation states, -1 in enthusiasm]
    • Republican President opts to increase funding for NASA
  • Castro Nationalizes US Property in Cuba
    • 1) Embargo and blockade Cuba with the US Navy until the property is returned [Intervention moved to +2, Intervention states give +1, Isolation states -1, place card on the board to roll for a potential war with possible consequences]. 2) Embargo Cuba, but do not send the navy. [no effect]. 3) Allow Cuba to act how they wish in their own country [+1 in isolation states, -1 in intervention states, +1 in states rights states, -1 enthusiasm, -1 unity]
    • Republican President decides to Embargo Cuba, but will not send the navy. 

Political Points (PP) and Hand Cards

  • Republican Player now has 4 PP. He uses 1 to roll to increase enthusiasm, 3 toward the US House, 1 in the NY Presidential polls. The enthusiasm roll succeeds!
  • The Democratic player also has 4 PP. He uses 1 in the US House. One each in PA, CA, NY Pres elections. 
  • Democratic Player plays the Gaffe Card, to give Republicans -1 in every election in a single state. The card is place near NY. 
  • Republican Player is left with two cards that are basically impotent for the rest of this election cycle. He discards the Presidential Influence on legislation card. 

Turn 6 - Will be bypassed as there isn't any Legislative Cards for the late phase. 

Up Next: Turn 7 -- Late Judicial Phase

 

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Turn 7 -- Late Judicial Phase

  • Republican player opts to start with discarding his last hand card, Exerting Presidential Influence, which only plays a role in legislation. 
  • Democratic player discards Diminish Unity, which only works on a single legislative vote, and won't be useful for the rest of this election.
  • Democrats use their 4 PP on MN Gov, MA Sen, 1 on the US House, and one in NY Pres Pol. 
  • Republicans have a whopping 7 PP, and they use 1 in NY Pres, 1 in CA pres, 1 in PA pres, and four on the US House
  • The Republican player has the Chief Justice, so he will present the sole court case for this election: Boynton v. Virginia, a case to decide if Racial Segregation is illegal in Public Transportation under the Interstate Commerce Act. 
    • The president has an option to: 1) Give an opinion protecting segregation (+1 in states rights, majority rule states); 2) Support the court in whatever decision they make (no effect); 3) Give an opinion rejecting segregation in this area (-1 in states rights, majority rule states)
    • Republican President opts to support the court decision.
    • A dice roll is made for the court decision. If it favors segregation, then either party may freely move their platform one direction towards Majority Rule or States Rights; if the court rejects segregation, then a party may freely move their platform one direction towards Minority Rights or Federal Prereogative. 
    • The Court declares segregation illegal in public transportation! 
    • Neither party chooses to move their platform. 

Up Next: Turn 8 - Election Day 1960!

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Turn 8 - ELECTION DAY 1960!

For election day, dice are rolled to determine the election victories:

  • Governor's Races! For Governor's races, factors that increase the chance of victory are: 1) Party platform that is similar to the preferred state issues of that state. 2) Holding both state Senators. 3) Having more enthusiasm than the other party. 4) Holding the incumbent governor. 5) Leading in PP used to influence that state. 6) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 
    • Democrats hold 35 of the 50 gubernatorial seats heading into election day.
    • Dice are rolled. Of the states with governor elections, only three states switch parties--all to the Republicans!
    • Democratic governor's lead falls from 35/50 to 32/50
  • US Senator Races! For US Senate races, factors that increase the chances of victory are: 1) Party platform that is similar to the preferred state issues of that state. 2) Holding the other US senator 3) Having more enthusiasm than the other party. 4) Holding the incumbent governor. 5) Leading in PP used to influence that state. 6) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 
    • Democrats hold 66 of the 100 senators heading into election day. 
    • Dice are rolled. Of the states with senate elections, seven senate seats switch parties--five to Republicans and two to Democrats!
    • Democratic US Senate lead falls from 66/100 to 63/100
  • US House Races!  For US House races, factors that increase the chance of victory are: 1) Leading in Party Enthusiasm. 2) Leading in PP used to influence US House race. 3) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 4) Having more politicians elected in the five states with the most EVs. 5) Having a platform in line with the Era Card
    • The House Meter determines if the majority party has a 65% or more majority, a 60% majority, 55% majority, or if there is no majority party. A major lead in enthusiasm (must have max enthusiasm) and a lead in PP will determine if a wave occurs. If a wave doesn't occur, then a roll to shift the meter one or two spots, or  keep it the same is performed. First a roll is conducted, using the factors that increase the chance of victory mentioned above, to see who will win the House Race. Then a second roll will be done to see how strong the victory is, or if no change really occurs. 
    • Republicans, who invested heavily with PP in US House races, easily win the roll. A second roll occurs, leading to the maximum victory for a non-wave election victory. Republicans increase their standing in the US House by a meter movement of two! 
    • Democratic US House lead falls from 65%+ in the US House to 55% of the US House
  • US Presidential Election! For the US Presidential election, factors that increase the chance of victory in a state are: 1) Leading in the presidential poll. 2) Leading in Party Enthusiasm. 3) Leading in PP influence for that state. 4) Having helpful Hand Card in that state. 5) Having a platform in line with the Era Card. 6) Having a platform in line with that state's preferred platform. 7) Having the incumbent governor. 8) Having control of all the US Senators of that state. 9) Having an incumbent president running for reelection. 10) Challenging a party that has held the presidency for two or more terms in a row. 
    • With these factors included, dice are rolled in the tossup election, that appears to lean Republican
    • Democrats barely win the US Presidency! LBJ defeats Nixon in 1960! [Had JFK been the nominee, and gone into the election with the same poll numbers, he might have lose because JFK allows for Southerners to go 3rd party, but JFK probably would have score better in some other states.]
    • See the presidential election result map below

SCORING for ROUND 1:

  • Democratic Party Points
    • 25 pts for finishing the election with a simple majority in the US House
    • 40 pts for finishing the election with a supermajority in the US Senate (60+ seats)
    • 100 pts for finishing the election with the presidency, while controlling both Houses of Congress
    • 9 pts for holding a simple lead in the Mid-Atlantic region
    • 6 pts for a simple lead in the Upper South
    • 20 pts for a major lead in the Deep South
    • 6 pts for a monopoly lead in Texas
      • Total Points: 206 points
  • Republican Party Points
    • 5 pts for holding a one judge lead in the Supreme Court
    • 4 pts for a simple lead in the New England region
    • 11 pts for a simple lead in the Midwest region
    • 1 pt for a simple lead in the Southwest
    • 2 pts for a simple lead in the Mountain States
    • 5 pts for a simple lead in the West Coast
    • 5 pts for a simple lead in the Great Plains region
      • Total Points: 43 points
  • Game Points given to the Victory of 1960: Dem Points minus Rep Points, leads to 163 Game Points given to the Democrats!
    • Democrats lead Republicans in the game 163-0

Brief Analysis: Despite the score, Republicans outplayed the Democrats. They made major gains, and were more likely to win the White House, but the roll fell into the Democrats favor, despite Republicans having a much stronger chance of winning the roll. LBJ (who is not yet a Liberal) strengthened support in the South, but places himself in a bad position when the Liberal Revolution Era, which begins in two elections. If Republicans can avoid Goldwater in 1964, then they may have a chance for victory. 

Patine @Reagan04 @jvikings1 @Conservative Elector 2 @Kingthero @Lyly @thr33 @Wiw @WVProgressive @TheLiberalKitten @Sunnymentoaddict @SeanFKennedy @Presidentinsertname @CalebsParadox @Sandy @lok1999 @LokiLoki22 @SirLagsalott @NYrepublican @ThePotatoWalrus @pilight @jnewt @LegolasRedbard @avatarmushi @victorraiders @Bruce Fischer @vcczar @michaelsdiamonds @European Qoheleth (SANC) @MysteryKnight @TheMiddlePolitical @quakercane @Caprice  

 

1960Results.jpg

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That should say Johnson and Nixon on the map

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7 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Turn 8 - ELECTION DAY 1960!

For election day, dice are rolled to determine the election victories:

  • Governor's Races! For Governor's races, factors that increase the chance of victory are: 1) Party platform that is similar to the preferred state issues of that state. 2) Holding both state Senators. 3) Having more enthusiasm than the other party. 4) Holding the incumbent governor. 5) Leading in PP used to influence that state. 6) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 
    • Democrats hold 35 of the 50 gubernatorial seats heading into election day.
    • Dice are rolled. Of the states with governor elections, only three states switch parties--all to the Republicans!
    • Democratic governor's lead falls from 35/50 to 32/50
  • US Senator Races! For US Senate races, factors that increase the chances of victory are: 1) Party platform that is similar to the preferred state issues of that state. 2) Holding the other US senator 3) Having more enthusiasm than the other party. 4) Holding the incumbent governor. 5) Leading in PP used to influence that state. 6) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 
    • Democrats hold 66 of the 100 senators heading into election day. 
    • Dice are rolled. Of the states with senate elections, seven senate seats switch parties--five to Republicans and two to Democrats!
    • Democratic US Senate lead falls from 66/100 to 63/100
  • US House Races!  For US House races, factors that increase the chance of victory are: 1) Leading in Party Enthusiasm. 2) Leading in PP used to influence US House race. 3) Having played helpful Hand Cards. 4) Having more politicians elected in the five states with the most EVs. 5) Having a platform in line with the Era Card
    • The House Meter determines if the majority party has a 65% or more majority, a 60% majority, 55% majority, or if there is no majority party. A major lead in enthusiasm (must have max enthusiasm) and a lead in PP will determine if a wave occurs. If a wave doesn't occur, then a roll to shift the meter one or two spots, or  keep it the same is performed. First a roll is conducted, using the factors that increase the chance of victory mentioned above, to see who will win the House Race. Then a second roll will be done to see how strong the victory is, or if no change really occurs. 
    • Republicans, who invested heavily with PP in US House races, easily win the roll. A second roll occurs, leading to the maximum victory for a non-wave election victory. Republicans increase their standing in the US House by a meter movement of two! 
    • Democratic US House lead falls from 65%+ in the US House to 55% of the US House
  • US Presidential Election! For the US Presidential election, factors that increase the chance of victory in a state are: 1) Leading in the presidential poll. 2) Leading in Party Enthusiasm. 3) Leading in PP influence for that state. 4) Having helpful Hand Card in that state. 5) Having a platform in line with the Era Card. 6) Having a platform in line with that state's preferred platform. 7) Having the incumbent governor. 8) Having control of all the US Senators of that state. 9) Having an incumbent president running for reelection. 10) Challenging a party that has held the presidency for two or more terms in a row. 
    • With these factors included, dice are rolled in the tossup election, that appears to lean Republican
    • Democrats barely win the US Presidency! LBJ defeats Nixon in 1960! [Had JFK been the nominee, and gone into the election with the same poll numbers, he might have lose because JFK allows for Southerners to go 3rd party, but JFK probably would have score better in some other states.]
    • See the presidential election result map below

SCORING for ROUND 1:

  • Democratic Party Points
    • 25 pts for finishing the election with a simple majority in the US House
    • 40 pts for finishing the election with a supermajority in the US Senate (60+ seats)
    • 100 pts for finishing the election with the presidency, while controlling both Houses of Congress
    • 9 pts for holding a simple lead in the Mid-Atlantic region
    • 6 pts for a simple lead in the Upper South
    • 20 pts for a major lead in the Deep South
    • 6 pts for a monopoly lead in Texas
      • Total Points: 206 points
  • Republican Party Points
    • 5 pts for holding a one judge lead in the Supreme Court
    • 4 pts for a simple lead in the New England region
    • 11 pts for a simple lead in the Midwest region
    • 1 pt for a simple lead in the Southwest
    • 2 pts for a simple lead in the Mountain States
    • 5 pts for a simple lead in the West Coast
    • 5 pts for a simple lead in the Great Plains region
      • Total Points: 43 points
  • Game Points given to the Victory of 1960: Dem Points minus Rep Points, leads to 163 Game Points given to the Democrats!
    • Democrats lead Republicans in the game 163-0

Brief Analysis: Despite the score, Republicans outplayed the Democrats. They made major gains, and were more likely to win the White House, but the roll fell into the Democrats favor, despite Republicans having a much stronger chance of winning the roll. LBJ (who is not yet a Liberal) strengthened support in the South, but places himself in a bad position when the Liberal Revolution Era, which begins in two elections. If Republicans can avoid Goldwater in 1964, then they may have a chance for victory. 

Patine @Reagan04 @jvikings1 @Conservative Elector 2 @Kingthero @Lyly @thr33 @Wiw @WVProgressive @TheLiberalKitten @Sunnymentoaddict @SeanFKennedy @Presidentinsertname @CalebsParadox @Sandy @lok1999 @LokiLoki22 @SirLagsalott @NYrepublican @ThePotatoWalrus @pilight @jnewt @LegolasRedbard @avatarmushi @victorraiders @Bruce Fischer @vcczar @michaelsdiamonds @European Qoheleth (SANC) @MysteryKnight @TheMiddlePolitical @quakercane @Caprice  

 

1960Results.jpg

It does look quite intriguing, indeed. I'm still just trying to absorb how this would fully work. I'm going to have to read these several threads over again in their entirety that I previously only read piecemeal as they were posted.

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19 minutes ago, Patine said:

It does look quite intriguing, indeed. I'm still just trying to absorb how this would fully work. I'm going to have to read these several threads over again in their entirety that I previously only read piecemeal as they were posted.

I'll have the instructions typed out in full; hopefully, in a week. It's a pain in the ass to type out the playthroughs, since I have to explain everything. It actually isn't as complicated as I had initially designed it. I'd say it's about Twilight Struggle complexity. 

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7 minutes ago, vcczar said:

I'll have the instructions typed out in full; hopefully, in a week. It's a pain in the ass to type out the playthroughs, since I have to explain everything. It actually isn't as complicated as I had initially designed it. I'd say it's about Twilight Struggle complexity. 

Alright. I may pop into Steam this evening, by the way.

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38 minutes ago, Patine said:

Alright. I may pop into Steam this evening, by the way.

What is your account.

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39 minutes ago, NYrepublican said:

What is your account.

Did you see the result of this playthrough?

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2 minutes ago, vcczar said:

Did you see the result of this playthrough?

Yes.

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28 minutes ago, NYrepublican said:

Yes.

Any thoughts?

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

Any thoughts?

Looks good. Not much more than that.

I also discovered an article on malware threats I began writing April 2016.(as well as a bunch of other stuff in that folder including a video of a Trump vs Trump debate by Stephen Colbert)

 

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I should add that if the game had a popular vote, that the Republicans probably won that convincingly. NV (3 EVs) was probably won by Democrats by a hair, as well. That state determined the election. 

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I'd like to here thoughts from @Sunnymentoaddict @ThePotatoWalrus @Reagan04 and @Caprice on this, after they read the playthrough and the results. My only changes at the moment are 1) Figuring out exactly what I want for hand cards. 2) I'm going to make state polls go from either 0-5, instead of M-10 (M was for mixed). This will cut down on the number of pieces drastically. 0-2 are battleground and leaning states. 3-5 are levels of safe states. 6-10 becomes unnecessary, and ultimately could make it impossible for a weaker player to win an election after a few elections, if the good player manages to get too many states past 5.

If this ends up being too complicated for a player (let me know), then I may simplify it into something similar to what @ThePotatoWalrus is doing except historical. It would focus just on the presidency, with the other elections (Gov, US House, Sen) being very simplified. Maybe @NYrepublican @Patine have something to say in regards to this. Which would you all prefer? Are you all more likely to play a game that focuses on presidential decisions or one that is Democrats vs. Republicans? I could feasibly try to make both, but I would need two passionate assistants that I can delegate some things to, especially if I do the president one.  

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@vcczar PLEASE don't simplify it anymore! You already cut the House down which I opposed, so Definetly keep it. Also, for SCOTUS, does ideology of the judges factor in?

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