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vcczar

Political Party BOARD Game

Political Party Board Game (Read the First LONG Comment  

17 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you be interested in playing such a board game? (Read the first LONG comment)

  2. 2. Would You be able to help in any of the following areas?

    • Coming up with ideas for the game (Least important for VCCzar)
    • Helping with artistic elements -- designing the cards, tokens, board---while VCCzar compiles the information for the cards, etc (Crucially important for VCCzar).
    • Converting this from a board game to a PC game (This would be ideal. It doesn't have to be fancy, just workable, working, and attractive enough to not turn people away)
    • Other (list below)
  3. 3. Do you hope that Admin/Anthony will take this project from VCCzar some day and have him make it into a 270Soft game, so you don't have to play it as a board game?

    • Yes, but only if he wants to make this game or he has time to make this game.
    • No. He should focus on updating and expanding his current election games.


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Here is the setup and some of the rule of the game, as I have it so far. Perhaps @admin_270 would consider making this a 270Soft game, as a PC always simplifies board games. 

 

ON THE TABLE: 

 
The Game Board
Several dice, calculator, pen/pencil & paper (optional)
Gilded Age Era Card (bonus for +1 or more Business and Self-Reliance) 
10 EV Alabama card (bonus for +2 or more States Rights and Majority Rule)
6 EV Arkansas card  (bonus for +2 or more States Rights)
6 EV California card  (bonus for +1 and +2 Nativist)
3 EV Colorado card (bonus for +1 or more Reform)
6 EV Connecticut card (bonus for +1 Protectionism)
3 EV Delaware card (bonus for +1 Free Trade)
4 EV Florida card (bonus for +2 or more States Rights)
11 EV Georgia card (bonus for +2 or more States Rights and Majority Rule)
21 EV Illinois card (bonus for +1 Tradition)
15 EV Indiana card (bonus for +1 Reform)
11 EV Iowa card (bonus for +1 or more Reform)
5 EV Kansas card (bonus for +1 or more Reform)
12 EV Kentucky card (bonus for +1 or +2 States Rights)
8 EV Louisiana card (bonus +2 or more States Rights and Majority Rule)
7 EV Maine card (bonus +1 or more Reform)
8 EV Maryland card (bonus +1 Free Trade)
13 EV Massachusetts card (bonus +1 Nativist; +2 Protectionism)
11 EV Michigan card (bonus 0 Reform/Tradition)
5 EV Minnesota card (bonus +1 Reform)
8 EV Mississippi card (bonus +2 or more States Rights and Majority Rule)
15 EV Missouri card (bonus for +1 Reform)
3 EV Nebraska card (bonus for +1 Reform)
3 EV Nevada card (bonus for +1 Reform)
5 EV New Hampshire card (bonus for +1 Protectionism)
9 EV New Jersey card (bonus for +1 Business and Immigration)
35 EV New York card (bonus for +1 Business, Immigration and Tradition)
10 EV North Carolina card (bonus for +1 and +2 States Rights)
22 EV Ohio card (bonus for +1 Tradition and Business)
3 EV Oregon card (bonus for +1 Reform and Nativist)
29 EV Pennsylvania card (bonus for +1 Tradition and Immigration)
4 EV Rhode Island card (bonus for +2 Protectionism and +1 Nativist)
7 EV South Carolina card (bonus +2 or more States Rights and Majority Rule)
12 EV Tennessee card (bonus +2 or more States Rights)
7 EV Texas card (bonus +2 or more States Rights)
5 EV Vermont card (bonus +2 Protectionism, +1 Nativist)
11 EV Virginia card (bonus +1 and +2 States Rights and +1 Free Trade)
5 EV West Virginia card (+1 States Rights)
10 EV Wisconsin card (+1 or more Reform)
 
On the Board: 
 
Year: 1880
Current Score: Republicans 0; Democrats 0
Cash Meter: Republicans at +1; Democrats at +0
Unity Meter: Republicans 2/3; Democrats 2/3
Momentum Meter: Republicans at -1; Democrats at +1
Protectionism/Free Trade Meter: Reps +1 Protectionism; Dems +2 Free Trade
Isolationism/Intervention Meter: Reps mixed; Dems +2 Isolationism
Social Welfare/Self-Reliance Meter: Reps +2 Self-R; Dems +1 Self-R
Pro-Immigrant/Nativist Meter: Reps +1 Nativist; Dems +1 Immigrant
Labor/Business: Reps +2 Business, Dems +1 Business
Minority Rights/Majority Rule: Reps +1 Minority; Dems +2 Majority
Federal Prerogative/States Rights: Reps mixed; Dems +2 States Rights
Reform/Tradition: Reps mixed; Dems mixed
 
President: R (Pres. Rutherford B. Hayes)
Supreme Court: R+7
 
State: AL (10)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+7
President: D+5
 
State: AR (6)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+4
President: D+5
 
State: CA (6)
Gov: R
Senate: M
House: R+2
President: M
 
State: CO (3)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+2
President: R+1
 
State: CT (6)
Gov: R
Senate: M
House: R+2
President: M
 
State: DE (3) 
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+2 
President: D+1
 
State: FL (4)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+3
President: D+2
 
State: GA (11)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+7
President: D+7
 
State: IL (21)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+7
President: R+1
 
State: IN (15)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: R+1
President: M
 
State: IA (11)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+9
President: R+3
 
State: KS (5)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+3
President: R+5
 
State: KY (12)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+10
President: D+3
 
State: LA (8)
Gov: D
Senate: M
House: D+6
President: D+6
 
State: ME (7)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+5
President: R+1
 
State: MD (8)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+4
President: D+2
 
State: MA (13)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+9
President: R+4
 
State: MI (11)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+9
President: R+2
 
State: MN (5)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+2
President: R+6
 
State: MS (8)
Gov: D
Senate: M
House: D+6
President: D+7
 
State: MO (15)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+11
President: D+2
 
State: NE (3)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+2
President: R+6
 
State: NV (3)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+2
President: D+1
 
State: NH (5)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+4
President: R+1
 
State: NJ (9)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: R+1
President: M
 
State: NY (35)
Gov: R
Senate: M
House: R+14
President: M
 
State: NC (10)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+4
President: D+1
 
State: OH (22)
Gov: R
Senate: D
House: D+2
President: R+1
 
State: OR (3)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+2
President: M
 
State: PA (29)
Gov: R
Senate: M
House: R+11
President: R+1
 
State: RI (4)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+3
President: R+6
 
State: SC (7)
Gov: R
Senate: D
House: D+5
President: D+7
 
State: TN (12)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+8
President: D+2
 
State: TX (7)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+4
President: D+7
 
State: VT (5)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+3
President: R+10
 
State: VA (11)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+7
President: D+5
 
State: WV (5)
Gov: D
Senate: D
House: D+3
President: D+2
 
State: WI (10)
Gov: R
Senate: R
House: R+2
President: R+2
 
Cards in 1880 Event Deck:
Species Resumptive Act 
Presidential Convention and VP Selection
Campaign Issue: Civil War loyalties
Campaign Issue: Tariffs 
Campaign Issue: Chinese immigration 
Prohibition Law 
Presidential Election Day
 
Examples of Cards in General Draw Deck:
Natural Disasters
Domestic Violence
Religious Demands
Economic Cards
Presidential Popularity Cards
Combat corruptions
Corrupt cards
Scandal cards
Campaign Blunder cards
Great Speech Card
Fundraise Card
Malaise Card
Weak Candidate Card
Strong Candidate Card
Disharmony within the Party
Harmony within the Party
Loss of Senator
Loss of US Rep
Loss of Justice
Loss of Governor
Etc. 
 
Uses of Political Power gained from Cash, Momentum, Pres and Gov Control:
1) Attempt to flip or protect governor seat on election year 
2) Attempt to flip or protect all US Reps in a single state in an election year
3) Attempt to flip or protect a US Sen in an election year (post-17th amendment)
4) Attempt to increase presidential polling in a single state
5) Attempt to influence the presidential convention/primary in election year (legal pre-1972; illegal but optional after 1972)
6) Attempt to alter the party platform meters
7) Attempt to increase Momentum
8) Attempt to increase Cash
9) Use to influence an Event Card to minimize damage or increase gain
10) Presidential barnstorm
11) Presidential veto
12) Override veto
13) Attempt to declare law unconstitutional
Scoring for each turn (Each Turn alternates btwn Pres Election Year and Midterms):
1) A point for holding the majority of SC justices--more points for leading with more justices.
2) A point for majority of state governors, more points for larger leads
3) A point for majority of the Senate, more points for supermajority
4) A point for majority of the US House, more points for supermajority
5) A point for holding the presidency, more points for landslide victory
6) A point for leading in momentum.
7) A point for leading in party unity.
 
Special Supreme Court Justice Rules:
1) Party the controls the presidency may appoint a Conservative, Liberal, or Swing Judge. 
2) The Senate can attempt to block the pick once; but must confirm the second judge, which must be of a different judicial persuasion. Thus, the president can appoint a Liberal, but if that judge is block, he must now appoint a swing or conservative, which must be accepted. 
3) The party that appoints the judge will benefit when scores are calculated. Conservative, Liberal or Swing judges can be colored Red (Republican) or Blue (Democrat). 
4) Court can test Constitutionality of a Law or in reaction to an event. 
 
Special US Senate Rules:
1) US Senate must vote on laws after House does so. Party unity effects vote cohesiveness. 
2) US Senators are selected by the Governors until the 17th Amendment is passed. 
3) US Senate must approve or deny Justices
4) VP breaks tie votes
5) Can override the veto of the president.
 
Special US House Rules:
1) US House must vote on laws before the Senate does. Party unity effects vote cohesiveness. 
2) US House selects President in the case of a tie. 
3) The Speaker of the House determines the order that Laws will be voted on, and when they will be voted on, but they must be voted on by the end of the year. 
4) Can override the veto of the president. 
 
Special Governors Rules:
1) Governors select US Senators before the 17th Amendment is passed. 
2) Governors determine if an Amendment is ratified. 
3) Governors select replacements for Senators and US Reps that die/resign in office. 
4) Governors influence Presidential Polling number more than US Senate or US House.
 
Special Presidential Rules:
1) President appoints Justices
2) President has sole decision making powers on some events. 
3) Can veto laws
4) Can barnstorm to influence support (diluting negative effects or raising positive effects)
 
Game Span and End Score: 
1) Game starts in 1880.
2a) Game ends at any predetermined election year not to exceed 2020. Recommend ends dates are 2020, 2016, 2008, 1980, 1968, 1948, 1932, 1920, 1912. This all depends on how much time you want to invest in a single game.
2b) You can set a score number to reach 
3) Each round alternatives between presidential election year and midterm year. 
4) All the scores for each round are added up throughout the game. 
 
 
 
 
 

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What's the range on the scales? Is it like what I suggested: -12 to +12. Or more like the 270soft games? 

Also, I'm liking how this is turning out. 

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56 minutes ago, Sunnymentoaddict said:

What's the range on the scales? Is it like what I suggested: -12 to +12. Or more like the 270soft games? 

Also, I'm liking how this is turning out. 

The platform meters are a scale of 7, somewhat equivalent to Far-right, Right, Center-right, Center, Center-left, Left, Far-left. However, I don't want to label them that, since neither party will ever be really radical as a whole. It's mainly how strong the preference is towards something. For instance, the scale will be something like this for the platform meters:

+3 Free Trade, +2 Free Trade, +1 Free Trade, Mixed, +1 Protectionism, +2 Protectionism, +3 Protectionism 

Cash and Momentum will be a larger scale, and both award Political Points that allow you to make your moves:

Momentum can be from -5 to +5 (The former taking away 5 PP, and the latter giving 5 PP)

Cash can be from -5 to +5 also (The former giving 0 PP, and the latter giving 32 PP)

Then there is the short unity meter, which is only three scales. This determined the likelihood of a unified vote for your party on bills and such. A 1 in unity means your more likely to role only a 75% support for your party for a bill, a 2 is 90%, and a 3 is 100%.

Say you have 52 senators, and you need 60 to support a bill. You have a 3 in unity, and the other party has a 2 in unity. Let's say you both role your likely support. You would have all 52 votes. You would gain only 5 Democrats, if the party opposes the measure. You'd have 57 votes, and the measure wouldn't pass. Let's say they had a 1 in unity, then they would give you 12 votes and it would pass. A bill that doesn't pass, I guess, could probably be brought up again at the discretion of leading Congressional Party, but probably not for that round. 

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What's also interesting about this hypothetical game is that some of the laws will really test your integrity. You might vote for things that are considered backwards by today's standards, and even consider somewhat immoral then, just for the sake of boosting your momentum, cash, or regional support. You might get caught in a situation where you have to choose doing the right thing or losing an election, potentially setting your party back for several years. 

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23 minutes ago, vcczar said:

What's also interesting about this hypothetical game is that some of the laws will really test your integrity. You might vote for things that are considered backwards by today's standards, and even consider somewhat immoral then, just for the sake of boosting your momentum, cash, or regional support. You might get caught in a situation where you have to choose doing the right thing or losing an election, potentially setting your party back for several years. 

Fascinating! I also think voting according to your campaign promises or what is doable is another interesting dichotomy.

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14 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

Fascinating! I also think voting according to your campaign promises or what is doable is another interesting dichotomy.

There will be bonuses and negatives for voting for or against the Party Platform. 

For instance, if you are playing as the Democrats, you are wise to diverge from your party platform only if you have a sound strategy in mind---basically a calculated risk. For instance, you might upset your base in the South, lose momentum and cash, for a boost in NY, because you know you'll need that to win, and you bank on holding the South, and your other states, despite the loss of Political Points from a loss of cash and momentum. 

I think I might post a hypothetical playthrough at some point. At least for 1880-1884, so people get an idea for the game. It will also let me find any holes in my system. I really hope someone with PC skills can convert this into a PC game, because otherwise everyone is going to have to construct the game themselves, once I type out all the information for cards and etc. I obviously can't mass produce the game. I wonder how people produce these things, where they aren't making it by hand at home without assistance?  

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1. YES
2. Ideas (and perhaps basic artistic elements, but probably not)
3. Didn't know, so I just put no.

Hope @NYrepublican helps you with this. I have no idea whatsoever at making multiplayer stuff, but if he knows how and helps you, I'd definitely play it.

@Reagan04, I'm challenging you first m8

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I'll have a playthrough for a hypothetical first round soon. 

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5 hours ago, ThePotatoWalrus said:

1. YES
2. Ideas (and perhaps basic artistic elements, but probably not)
3. Didn't know, so I just put no.

Hope @NYrepublican helps you with this. I have no idea whatsoever at making multiplayer stuff, but if he knows how and helps you, I'd definitely play it.

@Reagan04, I'm challenging you first m8

A Battle of Titans: The Far-Right Paleoconservative Preacher versus the Radical Libertarian Coke and Strippers Enthusiast Warrior

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I posted a playthrough in the playthrough Forum folder. 

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This seems pretty cool. I have to set aside some time to wrap my head around it, but it seems right up my alley. I'll check out the playthrough too, I suppose. But I may not be able to make a substantive reply until closer to the weekend.

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@vcczar Can I play Foster, Browder, and Hall's Communist Party of the USA, just for a fun challenge, or would such a very small party not work in the game engine you have in mind?

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1 hour ago, Reagan04 said:

A Battle of Titans: The Far-Right Paleoconservative Preacher versus the Radical Libertarian Coke and Strippers Enthusiast Warrior

Didn't need to cross that out, it's true, lol. John Mcafee is my spirit animal.

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10 minutes ago, Patine said:

@vcczar Can I play Foster, Browder, and Hall's Communist Party of the USA, just for a fun challenge, or would such a very small party not work in the game engine you have in mind?

Maybe if it were converted to PC

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I left a message on the Twilight Struggle Steam discussion board to see if I can find a PC guy and any other people hoping to help me make this game into something resembling an actual PC and/or board game. Naturally, I would hope @admin_270 would be ecstatic about the idea. I'm not looking to make any money off of this, it's just a game I want to be able to play. As no one has such a game, I had to make it myself. 

I'm tinkering with it to simplify it as we speak. 

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@vcczar I like where your priorities lie and hope you can find someone else who shares that view.

Too many people do it as a job instead of a hobby. I'm only making one to serve as a substitute until a possible official one is made.

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@Sunnymentoaddict @ThePotatoWalrus @Lyly @Reagan04 @Patine @Wiw

I've started typing out instructions. It's not done yet, but this gives an idea of what to expect in the instruction manual. You may have read my playthrough, but I think I've simplified the game a bit. 

 

i. Table of Contents

ii. Introduction
 
1. Contents
 
2. The Game Board
 
The game board present a map divided into 12 regions, each containing at least one state. Here is a list of these regions and states.:
  • New England (Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine)
  • Mid-Atlantic (New York, Pennsylvania, New York)
  • Midwest (Ohio, Indiana, West Virginia, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota)
  • Great Plains (North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, Oklahoma
  • Upper South (Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas)
  • Deep South (South Carolina, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana)
  • Texas (Texas)
  • Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah)
  • Mountain States (Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, Idaho)
  • West Coast (California, Oregon, Washington)
  • Hawaii (Hawaii)
  • Alaska (Alaska)
Each region is influenced by its Region Card (see 2.1.3).
 
State Boxes
 
Every state has four boxes. Here is a list of these four boxes:
  • The Governor's box
  • The box for US Senators
  • The box for US Reps
  • The Presidential Preference Box
A Blue (for Democrat). Red (for Republican), or Yellow (for Tied/Other) square will generally be placed in these boxes. 
  • For the Governor's Box, a simple colored square will represent the political affiliation of that state's governor. 
  • For the box for US Senators, a simple Blue or Red square will represent that both US Senators in that state are of the same party. A simple Yellow square means that the US Senator seats are split between the two major parties. In rare event that a 3rd Party takes a US Senator seat, then a simple Yellow square roughly shares the square with a Red or Blue simple square. 
  • For the box for US Reps, a numbered Blue or Red square, corresponding with the number of US Reps for the majority party in that state, will be placed on the box. If tied, then a simple yellow square will do. 
  • The Presidential Preference Box represents the support of the preferred party for the next Presidential Election. A Blue or Red square numbered 1 through 10 will represent the strength of support for that state's preferred party in the presidential election. If there is no preference, then a simple Yellow square will do. 
Region Cards and Region Card Spots
 
Region Cards present the unique qualities of each region, electorally speaking. Additionally, these cards will inform the player if any state diverges in any way from the other states in its region. Each election cycle will often present at least one new Region Card, which will amend a particular Region for however long the card is in play. Region Cards will generally present the following information:
  • How many electoral votes particular states in the region have for as long as the Region Card is in play. 
  • What campaign issue or issues are critically important to that region for as long as the Region Card is in play. 
  • Which of the region's States are not yet US States--therefore, not on the board--for as long as that Region Card is in play.
  • Which of the region's states might differ from the other states in the region--generally, on a campaign issue or issues--for as long as that Region Card is in play. 
Region Cards should be placed on the associated spots for Region Cards on the Game Board. When a new Region Card is activated, then the old Region Card for a specific Region must be replaced by the new Region Card for that Region. 
 
Enthusiasm Meter
 
The Enthusiasm Meter is above the map on the Game Board. This meter denotes voter enthusiasm for each party. The meter boxes go from +5 (ecstatic enthusiasm) to -5 (a dearth of enthusiasm). A 0 denotes indifference. Democratic Party enthusiasm is denoted by a simple Blue square on one of these boxes. Similarly, a simple Red square denotes enthusiasm for the Republican Party. 
 
This meter is the primary determinant for Political Points (PP). Cards, events, decisions, results and PP affect this meter. It also plays a role in voter enthusiasm, or lack thereof, on voting day. 
 
Unity Meter
 
The Unity Meter denotes the cohesiveness of a political party. The Unity Meter has three squares. The first square represents total unity. The second square represents strong unity. The third square represents partial unity. The unity of Democrats and Republicans will be represented by a simple Blue square and a simple Red square, respectfully. 
 
This meter helps to determine party cohesiveness for legislative votes in the US Senate or US House.  
 
Platform Meters
 
The following meters represent the political issues for each party. 
  • Protectionism vs. Free Trade
  • Isolationism vs. Intervention
  • Social Welfare vs. Self-Reliance
  • Pro-Immigrant vs. Nativist
  • Labor vs. Business
  • Minority Rights vs. Majority Rule
  • Federal Prerogative vs. States Rights
  • Reform vs. Tradition
As can be seen each issue has two sides. Each issue has seven squares. For instance, for Protectionism vs. Free Trade, we have have squares, +3, +2, +1, M, +1, +2, +3. As usual, a simple Blue (Democrats) or Red (Republican) square will denote where that party rests on this issue. The M stands for Mixed, which means the party is sitting on the fence on this issue if their colored square is on the M. If the party square is to the left of the M, then that party is devoted to Protectionism, and if it rests right of the M, then the party is devoted to Free Trade. The larger the number, the greater the devotion. 
 
Year Slot and Election Year Card
 
The game board allows for a Year Slot for the Election Year Card, so that players know what year they are currently in for the game. 
 
President Slot
 
The President Slot denotes the political party of the president. A simple Blue (Democrat) or Red (Republican) square will rest on this slot. 
 
US Senator Slots
 
The two two-slotted US Senator Slots denotes the total number of US Senators for each party.  The two Red slots are for the number of Republican Senators, and the two Blue slots are for the number of Democratic Senators. Corresponding, numbered squares are placed in the two slots to represent the total number of US Senators for that party. In the rare event of 3rd Party Senators, simple Yellow squares above these slots will due, with the total number of Yellow squares representing the number of 3rd Party Senators. 
 
The party with the largest number of US Senators will be the Senate Majority Party. If there is a tie vote, then the President's Party will be the Majority Party, since the Vice President votes in the case of a tie. 
 
The three markers marked 1, 2, and 3, above the two US Senator slots mark whether or not the Senate majority is a 1) a simple majority of less than 60% of the senators; 2) a super majority of more than 59% of the senators but less than 66% of the senators; 3) An invincible majority of 66% or more of the senators, which generally means the senate is veto proof. These markers simplify the voting process.  
 
These numbers of the US Senators for both parties will be adjusted following each election day. 
 
US House Slots
 
The two three-slotted US House Slots denote the total number of US Reps for each party. The three Red slots are for the number of Republican Representatives, and the three Blue slots are for the number of Democratic Representatives. Corresponding, numbered squares are placed in the three slots to represent the total number of US Reps for that party. In the rare event of 3rd Party Reps, simple Yellow squares above these slots will due, with the total number of Yellow squares representing the number of 3rd Party Reps. 
 
The party with the largest number of US Reps will control the US Speaker of the House. If there is a tie vote, the motion fails, unlike in the US Senate. 
 
The three markers marked 1, 2, and 3, above the two US House slots mark whether or not the House majority is a 1) a simple majority of less than 60% of the reps; 2) a super majority of more than 59% of the reps but less than 66% of the reps; 3) An invincible majority of 66% or more of the reps, which generally means the US House is veto proof. These markers simplify the voting process.   
 
These numbers of US Reps for both parties will be adjusted following each election day. 
 
The Supreme Court Slots
 
The nine Supreme Court Slots represent the justices of the Supreme Court. The justice squares are labeled L (for Liberal), S (for Swing), and C (for Conservative), and they are colored Red (Republican) or Blue (Democrat), according to the party that appointed the judge. The left most slot represent the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 
 
The Era Slot and Era Cards
 
The Era Slot is reserved for the Era Cards, which represent the Historical Era. Each Era Card offers bonuses to parties that aim to align with the ideals of the historical era in play. They must be in play in the years they represent. Era Cards include:
  • The Gilded Age (1880-1896)
  • The Progressive Era (1898-1916)
  • The Conservative High Tide (1918-1928)
  • The New Deal Era (1930-1944)
  • The Cold War Era (1946-1962)
  • The Liberal Revolution (1964-1978)
  • The Conservative Revolution (1980-2000)
  • The Era of Terror (2002-2014)
  • A Populist Era (2016-present)
Era Cards are kept with the Event Cards. 
 
The Score Slot
 
The Score Slot shows the overall score for the game, which is calculated after each Election Day and Midterm Election day. Numbered squares, Blue for Democrats and Red for Republicans, will represent the scores. 
 
3. Cards
 
Hand Cards
 
There are numerous Hand Cards in the game, each with different qualities that could affect different areas of the game. Each card has a title, a brief description, and an explanation of what the card can do. 
 
Each player will have five hand cards per round, all of which must be played prior to the results on election day. These cards can be played at any time during the round. 
 
After Hand Cards are used, they go to a discard pile (unless otherwise stated). All hand cards are reshuffled prior to every round. 
 
Event Cards
 
There are Event Cards for every year, all of which are revealed at the beginning of their respective years.  There are many types of Event Cards, each with a title, a type, a brief description, and an explanation of what the card does. The types of event cards that may show up in any given year include:
  • Election Year Card, which informs the players of the election year. 
  • Era Cards, which are used to denote the historical era. 
  • Legislation Cards, which are handed to the Speaker of the House's party and are used at times when Congress meets. 
  • Executive Cards, which are given to the President's party, and which are played during the times when noted on the card. 
  • Judicial Cards, which are given to the party that appointed the current Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 
  • Campaign Issue Cards, which are placed anywhere on the board or table. 
  • Presidential Convention Cards, which are placed anywhere on the board or table. 
  • Miscellaneous Event Cards, which are placed on the board or table and activated at the beginning of the year, unless otherwise stated. 
4. Markers
 
There are numerous markers in this game. They include the following:
  • Simple Blue (Democrat), Red (Republican), and Yellow (Mixed or Other) squares that represent their respective parties in instances that do not require a number. 
  • Numbered Blue (Democrat) and Red (Republican) squares that represent their respective parties in instances that do require numbers. 
  • Lettered Blue (Democrat-appointed) and Red (Republican-appointed) Supreme Court Justice Squares. 
The numbered squares range from 0-9, and they can be used for larger numbers required by the US Senate and US House. For instance, by placing a Blue 2, followed by another Blue 2, followed by a Blue 8 in the US House Slot for Democrats, you show that there are 228 Democratic US Representatives. Similarly, the US Senate has two slots for each party as well. Therefore, a Red 5 followed by a Red 4 would show the players that Republicans have 54 US Senators. 
 
5. Game Set Up
 
6. Game Sequence
 
7. Card Play w/ Examples
 
8. Legislation Rounds w/ Examples
 
9. Judicial Rounds w/ Examples
 
10. Executive Rounds w/ Examples
 
11. Presidential Convention Round w/ Examples
 
12. Campaign Issues Round w/ Examples
 
13. Miscellaneous Event Play w/ Examples
 
14. Political Points Play w/ Examples
 
15. Election Day Round w/ Examples
 
16. Scoring
 
17. Victory
 
18. Example Playthrough
 

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6 minutes ago, Caprice said:

PPBG.thumb.png.eae2f001249c20075b415199162f4c84.png

 

I put together a mock-up of what the game board might look like.

That's pretty cool! Something like that would work with some adjustments. 

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1 minute ago, Reagan04 said:

@vcczar What might a Judicial card be?

A court case on a landmark ruling or an attempt to strike something down as unconstitutional. 

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3 minutes ago, vcczar said:

That's pretty cool! Something like that would work with some adjustments. 

Like? Maybe I could put "G", "S", "H", and "P" into the state squares.

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11 minutes ago, Caprice said:

Like? Maybe I could put "G", "S", "H", and "P" into the state squares.

I'll have to draw out sort of what I have in mind, and then post the drawing on here. Its more about placement and size. For instance, if the squares can be a little bigger, then the board can be smaller, since the squares will be somewhere between the size of a nickel and a quarter, except square. The Era and Year cards will be about the size of a poker card, just like all the other cards, and so they should be longer than they are wide. Region Cards would also have spots on the board, ideally. The board also has the Enthusiasm Meter, Unity Meter, and the Various Platform Meters. You can either attempt to work with this information, or I could draw roughly what I was thinking of, but if you have a better idea on how to present this on the board, then I'm open to seeing your idea. 

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