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MysteryKnight

2020 Election playthrough

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9 minutes ago, MysteryKnight said:

In the end, Gillibrand was not able to take the White House from Trump. But she did manage to win the popular vote by over 4% (6 million+ votes!). 

Blue states went even more blue this time (Dems got over 70% of the vote in Cali, NY, VT, and RI, as well as 60+% in a number of other states). Republicans barely held onto PA, WI, MI, and squeaked out a victory in MN too. Interesting win from the Dems in Indiana though. I attached the results file also if you want to see all the state results

 

 

fians.png

ree.csv

I wonder why at least one non-battleground state randomly goes to the other party. Trump keeps winning, but losing the popular vote. 

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7 hours ago, Kingthero said:

why tf is Indiana blue lmao

Because elections in PI end up being more fun and more variety and chance for turning states in dramatic ways than in RL. The fact that the majority of states statistically vote for the same party every election of late and it all comes down to swing states makes U.S. election maps a lot less dynamic and interesting than Canadian, where a commentator in the 1993 Federal Election said famous, "in Canada, there are no safe seats (as in the British political term) and no dark coloured Provinces (and in the American dark red and dark blue states)."

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19 hours ago, Patine said:

Because elections in PI end up being more fun and more variety and chance for turning states in dramatic ways than in RL. The fact that the majority of states statistically vote for the same party every election of late and it all comes down to swing states makes U.S. election maps a lot less dynamic and interesting than Canadian, where a commentator in the 1993 Federal Election said famous, "in Canada, there are no safe seats (as in the British political term) and no dark coloured Provinces (and in the American dark red and dark blue states)."

Alberta seems pretty close to being one.

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4 hours ago, Reagan04 said:

Alberta seems pretty close to being one.

That's why it just voted an New Democratic (Canada's main social democratic party) majority Provincial government in 2015, defeating a large and seemingly entrenched Progressive Conservative majority (the Progressive Conservative is formerly the main centre-right party in Alberta before the 2017 merger with further right-wing Wildrose Alliance into the United Conservative Party in 2017, also the name of the main Federal centre-right party until 1993; merged with the further right-wing Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party of Canada; still the name of the main centre-right party in six Provincial level political party schemes - also, dynamic party politics is another thing more interesting in Canada over the U.S. having the same two absolutely dominant parties for about a century-and-a-half without serious challenge)

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On 2/24/2018 at 6:47 PM, Patine said:

Because elections in PI end up being more fun and more variety and chance for turning states in dramatic ways than in RL. The fact that the majority of states statistically vote for the same party every election of late and it all comes down to swing states makes U.S. election maps a lot less dynamic and interesting than Canadian, where a commentator in the 1993 Federal Election said famous, "in Canada, there are no safe seats (as in the British political term) and no dark coloured Provinces (and in the American dark red and dark blue states)."

Yeah, ending gerrymanding would allow us to be more like Canada, in regards to competitiveness. It's odd, the US, which values competition, economically, doesn't seem to desire political competition at the state level. 

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3 hours ago, Patine said:

That's why it just voted an New Democratic (Canada's main social democratic party) majority Provincial government in 2015, defeating a large and seemingly entrenched Progressive Conservative majority (the Progressive Conservative is formerly the main centre-right party in Alberta before the 2017 merger with further right-wing Wildrose Alliance into the United Conservative Party in 2017, also the name of the main Federal centre-right party until 1993; merged with the further right-wing Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party of Canada; still the name of the main centre-right party in six Provincial level political party schemes - also, dynamic party politics is another thing more interesting in Canada over the U.S. having the same two absolutely dominant parties for about a century-and-a-half without serious challenge)

And Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maryland have Republican Governors. Montana, Louisiana, and North Carolina have Democratic Governors. Point is they still gave the Tories 29 seats, with 4 for the Liberals and only one for the NDP. Federally it seems to be close to safe. That is the point I was trying to make, not that it is, but it sure is the closest thing Canada has.

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On 2/25/2018 at 6:20 PM, vcczar said:

Yeah, ending gerrymanding would allow us to be more like Canada, in regards to competitiveness. It's odd, the US, which values competition, economically, doesn't seem to desire political competition at the state level. 

Ah yes, one of the fundamental contradictions of capitalism - the development of monopolies via successful competition snuffs out the opportunity for further competition.

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