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vcczar

Final Update: US 1820

US 1820 Election Final Update  

4 members have voted

  1. 1. Will you be able to help with any of the following?

    • Play through the scenario and offer general feedback.
    • Play through as the Federalists or Independents. (It should be very difficult)
    • Help with other aspects such as double-checking information in the editor or in the .xls files, etc.
    • Sorry, I can't help with this scenario
      0


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Update:

  • I've add what-if Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr (both in their early 60's now).
  • I've added two unpledged anti-Monroe voter parties, one for Republicans and one for Federalists, which will be turned ON
  • I've added Martin Van Buren as a VP option, but may move him to a presidential candidate. 
  • Amended candidate abilities and campaign strengths, generally weakening Monroe opponents, but also reducing Monroe's charisma to 2, since my research is showing that there was zero Monroe enthusiasm despite everyone supporting him. 
  • Filled out the candidate descriptions
  • Wrote out a bunch of new events to add, which will be typed in later. 

Note: While this is an uncontested election, the what-if candidates allow for an exciting campaign. 

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Update:

  • Added even more events on the Missouri Compromise. 
  • Changed the party colors and logos for the Undpledged and Independent parties. 

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Update:

  • Have more newspaper endorsers to ad (Will also send this list to @jvikings1 for his 1824, in addition to the other emails I already sent to him). 

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Update: Added what-if James Madison

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Updated: Added far-left and far-right descriptions and amended platforms of the candidates

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@Lyly here's 1820 for the map. Also, if anyone wants to test 1820. I also need testers for 1816 and 1812. 

 

United States - 1820 Test.zip

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@Lyly any update on the map? There really isn't too much of a rush, since I still need to post 1812 and 1816 after a little more tinkering. 

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I will have the map done soon. Sorry I cannot offer to play most of the campaigns that need attention right now. You can tell I've been away from things for about a week or so.

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On 1/29/2018 at 2:45 PM, Lyly said:

I will have the map done soon. Sorry I cannot offer to play most of the campaigns that need attention right now. You can tell I've been away from things for about a week or so.

No worries. Glad you're back. 

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Here is the 1820 scenario with updated map! Lots of new states this time around. I will be so happy come the 1840s and the default map alignment can be used again.

United States - 1820m.rar

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@jvikings1 As @Lyly has given me the 1820 map. You might want to upload your latest version of 1824 to here, so that he can add the 1824 map to it (unless you want to keep your map).

Thanks, Lyly!

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Going to finish up 1820 now. Should be done within a week, if not a couple of days. 

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I've begun adding more endorsers to this election. 

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I added about 15 more endorsers. I have a lot more to go, so this update may take a little longer than expected; although, I'd say about 80% of the update is finished. 

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On ‎2‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 12:06 PM, vcczar said:

@jvikings1 As @Lyly has given me the 1820 map. You might want to upload your latest version of 1824 to here, so that he can add the 1824 map to it (unless you want to keep your map).

Thanks, Lyly!

I haven't had much time to work on other things (or even visit the forum for that matter), so there isn't much to upload yet (18 credit hours brings on quite a bit of work).  I'll probably use @Lyly's map once the time comes to upload.

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@jvikings1 No prob. 

@ everyone else 

I've completed the 1820 endorsers. 

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Added Harrison Gray Otis to the Federalists, adjusted platforms, and added General Election bonuses. This scenario, which is mostly a what-if scenario, is close to done. I just need to double check a lot of things and then test it. Hopefully, I'll have it up by this weekend. 

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On ‎2018‎-‎02‎-‎13 at 4:27 PM, jvikings1 said:

I haven't had much time to work on other things (or even visit the forum for that matter), so there isn't much to upload yet (18 credit hours brings on quite a bit of work).  I'll probably use @Lyly's map once the time comes to upload.

You know, it's been SOOO long since I was in school, that when people in my general circles say they have pressing problems and demands on them with the word "credit" in them, it means paying off debts and the bills... :P

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11 minutes ago, Patine said:

You know, it's been SOOO long since I was in school, that when people in my general circles say they have pressing problems and demands on them with the word "credit" in them, it means paying off debts and the bills... :P

@jvikings1 18 credit hours is a lot. I think I took 15 credit hours one semester, but all other semesters, I took 12 hours. I always had so many ongoing personal projects and side-gigs that I never desired to take more than that. For a few semesters, when I was still a teenager, and when I was at a community college to get the basics for cheap, I took less than 12 hours because I was a still the manager at a video game store. I don't remember how I balanced homework and working full time. 

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On ‎2018‎-‎02‎-‎13 at 4:27 PM, jvikings1 said:

I haven't had much time to work on other things (or even visit the forum for that matter), so there isn't much to upload yet (18 credit hours brings on quite a bit of work).  I'll probably use @Lyly's map once the time comes to upload.

 

55 minutes ago, vcczar said:

@jvikings1 18 credit hours is a lot. I think I took 15 credit hours one semester, but all other semesters, I took 12 hours. I always had so many ongoing personal projects and side-gigs that I never desired to take more than that. For a few semesters, when I was still a teenager, and when I was at a community college to get the basics for cheap, I took less than 12 hours because I was a still the manager at a video game store. I don't remember how I balanced homework and working full time. 

I also not quite sure what these credit numbers mean, as our system of allotment of education slots and time in schools up here is VERY different...

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35 minutes ago, Patine said:

 

I also not quite sure what these credit numbers mean, as our system of allotment of education slots and time in schools up here is VERY different...

US colleges use credit hours for graduation. You have to have so many credit hours for a major, for a minor, and for core classes, and for graduation. Grad school programs also have their own credit hours. A credit hour is roughly equivalent to an hour's time. 18 credits means that a student is probably taking six classes, since most classes are 3 credit hours, meaning the class meets for about an hour three days a week, or it meets longer for two days a week. In grad school, it it generally one class a week that is about three hours. Honors classes are like this as well. 

 

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4 minutes ago, vcczar said:

US colleges use credit hours for graduation. You have to have so many credit hours for a major, for a minor, and for core classes, and for graduation. Grad school programs also have their own credit hours. A credit hour is roughly equivalent to an hour's time. 18 credits means that a student is probably taking six classes, since most classes are 3 credit hours, meaning the class meets for about an hour three days a week, or it meets longer for two days a week. In grad school, it it generally one class a week that is about three hours. Honors classes are like this as well. 

 

Ah, we just have the flat credits, without the hours factor. This makes it easier for mature students returning to school in adulthood to gain a diploma they may not have as an actual adolescent or take post-secondary course outside of typical "college age." I know the U.S. uses private correspondence colleges extensively for such purposes (U.S. correspondence colleges advertise in and to Canadian markets), but I don't what, if anything, the main institutional U.S. educational system has for mature student returner education.

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26 minutes ago, Patine said:

Ah, we just have the flat credits, without the hours factor. This makes it easier for mature students returning to school in adulthood to gain a diploma they may not have as an actual adolescent or take post-secondary course outside of typical "college age." I know the U.S. uses private correspondence colleges extensively for such purposes (U.S. correspondence colleges advertise in and to Canadian markets), but I don't what, if anything, the main institutional U.S. educational system has for mature student returner education.

I really don't like the credit hour system, since it seems like the student just has to spend time, like it's a prison. The student should be able to go through the courses as quickly or slowly as he or she wishes. Attendance shouldn't be required, except on test days, since some students learn better independently. Multiple Choice tests should be outlawed in favor of essays, long answer, short answer, or oral equivalent tests. Classes should have no more than 12 students per class. College should be free and attainable; however, the standard for graduation should be much higher. A diploma should mean something much more than time spent in a classroom. Students should be able to craft their core classes in ways that make much more sense with their degree. A drama student shouldn't have to take a math course by force, for instance. Logic would be a better substitute that uses the same part of the brain. 

I have some other thoughts on this as well. I think High School should also be reformed in a way that specifically prepares students for college, rather than rehashing a lot of the things learned in Middle School. Students that are college ready should be able to start college early. High School students that graduate and are not college ready have the option to go to a trade school or some sort of Summer intensive course designed to help students become college ready. 

Both High School and Colleges should gear some of the academics towards finding a job and learning about the job and basic life skills. This could be a separate class, so as to not interfere with the academic section of the courses. 

Colleges should hire numerous HR people who are employed to help find jobs for their students, so that they have a place to work upon graduation. Colleges can work with companies to have online interviews with company and student. The college or university that adopts this would obviously see an increase in enrollment if it is successful.  Currently, colleges don't seek jobs for their students; although, Harvard has the reveres, as it is consistently bombarded by Hedge Funds and other similar organization that attempt to get commitments from math-oriented ivy leaguers before they even graduate. 

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I work nights at my uni (I clean classrooms, hallways, bathrooms, etc.) to pay for classes during the day, but I have to work full time to be able to afford any class at all, so I can only do 2 at a time to balance with working 40+ hours a week. Between the job and classes, plus studying, plus making/consuming food, plus the lax time between when my night job lets off and classes begin (during which I unfortunately cannot take a nap), it adds up to a little less than two full time jobs, but with less than half as much income.

In the United States, without scholarships, the only way to not have to work-study is to take out massive and ballooning loans, which I am not willing to be subject to.

I agree generally with all of vcczar's arguments above - especially in educating people about how to participate smartly in the workforce. There are entire industries that rely on the ignorance of young workers who have not learned yet how to negotiate for themselves or apply their skills and motivation into getting something better out of their job. And of course, unions in this country are practically dead. Even those that continue to exist actively discourage their members from collective action or recruitment - Jimmy Hoffa the Younger is a complete tool, for example.

And the secondary education system (that is, middle and high schools - because of course Americans don't even tend to recognize which levels of education exist, so I have to specify) is almost entirely a re-hashing of everything already established in primary education. How many times do we have to go over the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and Civil War in detail, rush through everything else before we get to advance to the damn class that picks up where we left off? Here in Texas, American History is taught something like 3 times over the course of primary and secondary years, but it is literally the exact same material each and every time. I cannot name a student who graduated with me who was ever educated more than a paragraph's worth of cursory introduction on anything in American history that occurred after 1900.

Granted, I'm a poor country boy and my school was mostly just athletics coaches who were also accredited as teachers, so it's not reflective of the education that kids get in the suburbs. But, frankly, shouldn't that be the point? American education sucks, except where it doesn't - which is rich, white suburbs. Excuse me, I should reframe that to mean engorged property tax districts, not that I know the difference between the two!

I'm not totally opposed to the traditional American degree program, actually (of, say, asking that a drama student have core understandings of mathematics, etc.), but I'd rather both models be available to students. I'm also not completely in agreement that classes should max out at 12 students. I have taught before and my classes have varied in sizes, so I do have personal experience on the matter. For me, the sweet spot was definitely 12, don't get me wrong, but I can just as easily teach up to twice that size. When I got up to 60 kids in a class though - it was effectively like not even being in a class. There's too much for the teacher to do aside from teaching - making sure people are paying attention, making sure people aren't disrupting others, giving people permission to go to the bathroom, anything involving administrative tasks takes several minutes (think about taking roll of 60 people, not all of whom are in the classroom at the time you begin, so you'll be going over the list at least twice; handing back grades; handing out assignments - all of things become exponentially more time draining the more students are added). At the tertiary/college level, I'm not so sure where the line ought to be drawn, but I'm sure as hell opposed to the 120-seat remedial math classes I've seen. How the hell anyone can help 120 people improve their varying math skills within 45 minutes is beyond me.

I guess I ought to say I am skeptical of practically all schemes to match education standards to jobs training requirements, mostly because that's typically code for cutting support for students, slashing teachers' pay, and offloading your precious 12-students-1-professor model into a 600-online-students-1-proctor model. I know that's not your argument, and don't get me wrong, on a theoretical level I am not so opposed, but when it comes down to what really plays out when universities and corporations team up is just what I've described.

And of course, to hell with standardized testing and especially to hell with linking school funding cuts to poor standardized test scores (the formula is backward).

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This election might be up today. 

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