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LegolasRedbard

UK 1979 - 2015

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CALLAGHAN LOSES NO CONFIDENCE VOTE

29th March 1979

 

In what may possibly be the most dramatic night in Westminster's history, James Callaghan's government has been brought down by one vote. An election has been called for May 3rd, and Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives hold an initial lead over Labour, with the Liberals facing electoral wipeout following the Thorpe affair. The SNP as well are facing major losses, as they were instrumental in the downfall of the government. Current projections from our polls give the following projections for seat gains and losses

CON: 318 (+32)

LAB: 286 (-24)

LIB: 1 (-13)

SNP: 1 (-8)

OTH: 14

UNDECIDED: 15

 

Who will win? We will find out in 35 days

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34 minutes ago, LegolasRedbard said:

CALLAGHAN LOSES NO CONFIDENCE VOTE

29th March 1979

 

In what may possibly be the most dramatic night in Westminster's history, James Callaghan's government has been brought down by one vote. An election has been called for May 3rd, and Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives hold an initial lead over Labour, with the Liberals facing electoral wipeout following the Thorpe affair. The SNP as well are facing major losses, as they were instrumental in the downfall of the government. Current projections from our polls give the following projections for seat gains and losses

CON: 318 (+32)

LAB: 286 (-24)

LIB: 1 (-13)

SNP: 1 (-8)

OTH: 14

UNDECIDED: 15

 

Who will win? We will find out in 35 days

And that was the day that British society began the great tumble downwards...

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2 minutes ago, Presidentinsertname said:

no that was the day Churchill resign.

Churchill was a great and masterful (and needed) wartime Prime Minister - probably the best the UK has had, along with perhaps William Pitt the Younger. As a peacetime Prime Minister, Churchill was a bigger bomb than any dropped during the Blitz - his viewpoints were anachronistic and outdated by half a century, and his bulldog-like tenacity that served him so well during the war just made him and unadaptive, inefficient, tyrannical, uncharismatic dinosaur whose bigotries and stubbornness were on full display in his second term in the early '50's.

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LABOUR LOSES SAFE SEAT TO SCANDAL RIDDEN LIBERALS

30th March 1979

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Despite being seriously damaged by the Thorpe Affair, the Liberals last night proved they still have some fight left in them. They won almost 65% of the vote in the by-election held in Liverpool, Edge Hill last night, gaining the seat from Labour, who have held the seat since 1945. It is yet another blow to the Government, who are now have one less seat in their minority government

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Conservative MP Airey Neave has been killed in a car bomb attack outside the House of Commons. The 63 year old, the Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary and a lawyer who served the International Millitary Tribunal in Nuremberg, was assassinated by a group calling itself the Irish National Liberation Army. Margaret Thatcher said of him:

"He was one of freedom's warriors. No one knew of the great man he was, except those nearest to him. He was staunch, brave, true, strong; but he was very gentle and kind and loyal. It's a rare combination of qualities. There's no one else who can quite fill them. I, and so many other people, owe so much to him and now we must carry on for the things he fought for and not let the people who got him triumph."

 

The attack comes two days after the vote of no confidence which brought down Prime Minister James Callaghan's government...

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TORIES WIN MAJORITY

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Margaret Thatcher has became the first female Prime Minister in British history, after leading the Conservative Party to a comfortable majority in the House of Commons. They gained 68 seats, with the governing Labour Party losing 58 seats. The Liberal Party mostly weathered the storm that the Thorpe Affair had caused, losing only 3 seats, while the Nationalist Parties combined won 5 seats, losing 7

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The Thatcher Cabinet, May 1979

 

Prime Minister - Margaret Thatcher

Home Secretary - William Whitelaw

Sir Geoffrey Howe - Chancellor of the Exchequer

John Biffen - Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Lord Carrington - Foreign Secretary

Peter Walker - Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Norman St John-Stevas - Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Francis Pym - Defence Secretary

Mark Carlisle - Education and Science Secretary

James Prior - Employment Secretary

David Howell - Energy Secretary

Michael Heseletine - Environment Secretary

Patrick Jenkin - Health and Social Security Secretary

Keith Joseph - Industry Secretary

Humphrey Atkins - Northern Ireland Secretary

Angus Maude - Paymaster-General

Teddy Taylor - Scotland Secretary

John Nott - Trade Secretary

Nicholas Edwards - Wales Secretary

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1 hour ago, LegolasRedbard said:

The Thatcher Cabinet, May 1979

 

Prime Minister - Margaret Thatcher

Home Secretary - William Whitelaw

Sir Geoffrey Howe - Chancellor of the Exchequer

John Biffen - Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Lord Carrington - Foreign Secretary

Peter Walker - Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Norman St John-Stevas - Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Francis Pym - Defence Secretary

Mark Carlisle - Education and Science Secretary

James Prior - Employment Secretary

David Howell - Energy Secretary

Michael Heseletine - Environment Secretary

Patrick Jenkin - Health and Social Security Secretary

Keith Joseph - Industry Secretary

Humphrey Atkins - Northern Ireland Secretary

Angus Maude - Paymaster-General

Teddy Taylor - Scotland Secretary

John Nott - Trade Secretary

Nicholas Edwards - Wales Secretary

I knew Teddy Taylor was going to be the Scotland Secretary! It's not like Thatcher was spoiled for viable, loyal, and reliable choice there, though.

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Thatcher's first term in office was a time of great social strife in the United Kingdom. Thatcher's main focus when it came to the economy was to control inflation, rather than unemployment. The raising of VAT to 15%, along with the general pressure on the economy hit businesses hard, and by the end of 1980, unemployment had risen to 2 million. With many commentators, and notably former Prime Minister Ted Heath, urging her to reverse her liberalization of the economy, Thatcher delivered a defiant speech at 1980's party conference, where she famously said:

 

"To those waiting with bated breath for that favourite media catchphrase, the 'U-turn', I have only one thing to say: 'You turn' if you want to. The lady's NOT for turning."

 

Ironically it was in 1980 that Mrs. Thatcher u-turned over another issue, and reversed her previous endorsement of higher defence spending, and began to make cuts, with one particular area of cuts being the Royal Navy, a move that would later come to haunt the Prime Minister. Thatcher also had to deal with riots in inner cities, and by Christmas 1981, Thatcher was being encouraged by higher-ups in her party to resign as Prime Minister. She rejected these suggestions, and by 1982, inflation had dropped from 18% to 8%, allowing interest rates to fall.

 

Thatcher also proved herself to be a staunch fighter against terrorism. In 1980, Iranian terrorists took over the Iranian Embassy in London, and Thatcher's authorization to take decisive action and order the SAS to storm the embassy with lethal force, created an image of a strong leader. Despite the hardships, many Britons supported the Prime Minister, and going into 1983, her approval rating was at 40%. Surprisingly, Thatcher called an early election for June 1983, hoping to capitalise on the strength of the economy and the weakness of the Labour Party

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Election 1983

 

With Thatcher's approval rating getting higher as the economy improved, she also benefitted from the absolute chaos that was occurring on the opposite side of the House of Commons. Deputy Leader under Jim Callaghan, Michael Foot was narrowly elected in 1980 as leader of the Labour Party, as a left-wing compromise candidate. Despite an initial lead in opinion polls over the struggling Thatcher, Foot's age and hard-left views (and his apparent resemblance to Worzel Gummidge) led to moderate Labour voters worrying about the future of the party under their new Leader. In January 1981, four senior politicians on the right wing of the party defected, and formed the Social Democratic Party (Roy Jenkins, Shirley Williams, David Owen and William Rodgers, with Jenkins being elected as their first leader), which was joined by 28 Labour MPs. In the Tory safe seats of Corby and Glasgow Hillhead, Williams and Jenkins won by-elections to join the House of Commons. Concerned about Foot's popularity, a small group of left-wing allies of Foot met with him privately, and after much debate, convinced Foot to step aside, and endorsed another left-winger, Tony Benn. Benn narrowly beat Dennis Healey to become leader in October 1982. With the Tory lead narrowing, Benn could stand a chance of increasing Labour's seats, although outright victory looks unlikely. The SDP, now in an outright electoral Alliance with the Liberals could prove to be their undoing, tied with Labour in the polls

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37 minutes ago, LegolasRedbard said:

Thatcher's first term in office was a time of great social strife in the United Kingdom. Thatcher's main focus when it came to the economy was to control inflation, rather than unemployment. The raising of VAT to 15%, along with the general pressure on the economy hit businesses hard, and by the end of 1980, unemployment had risen to 2 million. With many commentators, and notably former Prime Minister Ted Heath, urging her to reverse her liberalization of the economy, Thatcher delivered a defiant speech at 1980's party conference, where she famously said:

 

"To those waiting with bated breath for that favourite media catchphrase, the 'U-turn', I have only one thing to say: 'You turn' if you want to. The lady's NOT for turning."

 

Ironically it was in 1980 that Mrs. Thatcher u-turned over another issue, and reversed her previous endorsement of higher defence spending, and began to make cuts, with one particular area of cuts being the Royal Navy, a move that would later come to haunt the Prime Minister. Thatcher also had to deal with riots in inner cities, and by Christmas 1981, Thatcher was being encouraged by higher-ups in her party to resign as Prime Minister. She rejected these suggestions, and by 1982, inflation had dropped from 18% to 8%, allowing interest rates to fall.

 

Thatcher also proved herself to be a staunch fighter against terrorism. In 1980, Iranian terrorists took over the Iranian Embassy in London, and Thatcher's authorization to take decisive action and order the SAS to storm the embassy with lethal force, created an image of a strong leader. Despite the hardships, many Britons supported the Prime Minister, and going into 1983, her approval rating was at 40%. Surprisingly, Thatcher called an early election for June 1983, hoping to capitalise on the strength of the economy and the weakness of the Labour Party

"A bottle of medicine helps the sugar go down." :P

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