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LegolasRedbard

UK 1979 - 2015

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CALLAGHAN LOSES NO CONFIDENCE VOTE

29th March 1979

 

In what may possibly be the most dramatic night in Westminster's history, James Callaghan's government has been brought down by one vote. An election has been called for May 3rd, and Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives hold an initial lead over Labour, with the Liberals facing electoral wipeout following the Thorpe affair. The SNP as well are facing major losses, as they were instrumental in the downfall of the government. Current projections from our polls give the following projections for seat gains and losses

CON: 318 (+32)

LAB: 286 (-24)

LIB: 1 (-13)

SNP: 1 (-8)

OTH: 14

UNDECIDED: 15

 

Who will win? We will find out in 35 days

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34 minutes ago, LegolasRedbard said:

CALLAGHAN LOSES NO CONFIDENCE VOTE

29th March 1979

 

In what may possibly be the most dramatic night in Westminster's history, James Callaghan's government has been brought down by one vote. An election has been called for May 3rd, and Margaret Thatcher's Conservatives hold an initial lead over Labour, with the Liberals facing electoral wipeout following the Thorpe affair. The SNP as well are facing major losses, as they were instrumental in the downfall of the government. Current projections from our polls give the following projections for seat gains and losses

CON: 318 (+32)

LAB: 286 (-24)

LIB: 1 (-13)

SNP: 1 (-8)

OTH: 14

UNDECIDED: 15

 

Who will win? We will find out in 35 days

And that was the day that British society began the great tumble downwards...

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2 minutes ago, Presidentinsertname said:

no that was the day Churchill resign.

Churchill was a great and masterful (and needed) wartime Prime Minister - probably the best the UK has had, along with perhaps William Pitt the Younger. As a peacetime Prime Minister, Churchill was a bigger bomb than any dropped during the Blitz - his viewpoints were anachronistic and outdated by half a century, and his bulldog-like tenacity that served him so well during the war just made him and unadaptive, inefficient, tyrannical, uncharismatic dinosaur whose bigotries and stubbornness were on full display in his second term in the early '50's.

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LABOUR LOSES SAFE SEAT TO SCANDAL RIDDEN LIBERALS

30th March 1979

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Despite being seriously damaged by the Thorpe Affair, the Liberals last night proved they still have some fight left in them. They won almost 65% of the vote in the by-election held in Liverpool, Edge Hill last night, gaining the seat from Labour, who have held the seat since 1945. It is yet another blow to the Government, who are now have one less seat in their minority government

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Conservative MP Airey Neave has been killed in a car bomb attack outside the House of Commons. The 63 year old, the Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary and a lawyer who served the International Millitary Tribunal in Nuremberg, was assassinated by a group calling itself the Irish National Liberation Army. Margaret Thatcher said of him:

"He was one of freedom's warriors. No one knew of the great man he was, except those nearest to him. He was staunch, brave, true, strong; but he was very gentle and kind and loyal. It's a rare combination of qualities. There's no one else who can quite fill them. I, and so many other people, owe so much to him and now we must carry on for the things he fought for and not let the people who got him triumph."

 

The attack comes two days after the vote of no confidence which brought down Prime Minister James Callaghan's government...

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TORIES WIN MAJORITY

Capture.PNG.0d036330f55a238a33b262f0922b7658.PNG

Margaret Thatcher has became the first female Prime Minister in British history, after leading the Conservative Party to a comfortable majority in the House of Commons. They gained 68 seats, with the governing Labour Party losing 58 seats. The Liberal Party mostly weathered the storm that the Thorpe Affair had caused, losing only 3 seats, while the Nationalist Parties combined won 5 seats, losing 7

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The Thatcher Cabinet, May 1979

 

Prime Minister - Margaret Thatcher

Home Secretary - William Whitelaw

Sir Geoffrey Howe - Chancellor of the Exchequer

John Biffen - Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Lord Carrington - Foreign Secretary

Peter Walker - Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Norman St John-Stevas - Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Francis Pym - Defence Secretary

Mark Carlisle - Education and Science Secretary

James Prior - Employment Secretary

David Howell - Energy Secretary

Michael Heseletine - Environment Secretary

Patrick Jenkin - Health and Social Security Secretary

Keith Joseph - Industry Secretary

Humphrey Atkins - Northern Ireland Secretary

Angus Maude - Paymaster-General

Teddy Taylor - Scotland Secretary

John Nott - Trade Secretary

Nicholas Edwards - Wales Secretary

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1 hour ago, LegolasRedbard said:

The Thatcher Cabinet, May 1979

 

Prime Minister - Margaret Thatcher

Home Secretary - William Whitelaw

Sir Geoffrey Howe - Chancellor of the Exchequer

John Biffen - Chief Secretary to the Treasury

Lord Carrington - Foreign Secretary

Peter Walker - Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Norman St John-Stevas - Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Francis Pym - Defence Secretary

Mark Carlisle - Education and Science Secretary

James Prior - Employment Secretary

David Howell - Energy Secretary

Michael Heseletine - Environment Secretary

Patrick Jenkin - Health and Social Security Secretary

Keith Joseph - Industry Secretary

Humphrey Atkins - Northern Ireland Secretary

Angus Maude - Paymaster-General

Teddy Taylor - Scotland Secretary

John Nott - Trade Secretary

Nicholas Edwards - Wales Secretary

I knew Teddy Taylor was going to be the Scotland Secretary! It's not like Thatcher was spoiled for viable, loyal, and reliable choice there, though.

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Thatcher's first term in office was a time of great social strife in the United Kingdom. Thatcher's main focus when it came to the economy was to control inflation, rather than unemployment. The raising of VAT to 15%, along with the general pressure on the economy hit businesses hard, and by the end of 1980, unemployment had risen to 2 million. With many commentators, and notably former Prime Minister Ted Heath, urging her to reverse her liberalization of the economy, Thatcher delivered a defiant speech at 1980's party conference, where she famously said:

 

"To those waiting with bated breath for that favourite media catchphrase, the 'U-turn', I have only one thing to say: 'You turn' if you want to. The lady's NOT for turning."

 

Ironically it was in 1980 that Mrs. Thatcher u-turned over another issue, and reversed her previous endorsement of higher defence spending, and began to make cuts, with one particular area of cuts being the Royal Navy, a move that would later come to haunt the Prime Minister. Thatcher also had to deal with riots in inner cities, and by Christmas 1981, Thatcher was being encouraged by higher-ups in her party to resign as Prime Minister. She rejected these suggestions, and by 1982, inflation had dropped from 18% to 8%, allowing interest rates to fall.

 

Thatcher also proved herself to be a staunch fighter against terrorism. In 1980, Iranian terrorists took over the Iranian Embassy in London, and Thatcher's authorization to take decisive action and order the SAS to storm the embassy with lethal force, created an image of a strong leader. Despite the hardships, many Britons supported the Prime Minister, and going into 1983, her approval rating was at 40%. Surprisingly, Thatcher called an early election for June 1983, hoping to capitalise on the strength of the economy and the weakness of the Labour Party

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Election 1983

 

With Thatcher's approval rating getting higher as the economy improved, she also benefitted from the absolute chaos that was occurring on the opposite side of the House of Commons. Deputy Leader under Jim Callaghan, Michael Foot was narrowly elected in 1980 as leader of the Labour Party, as a left-wing compromise candidate. Despite an initial lead in opinion polls over the struggling Thatcher, Foot's age and hard-left views (and his apparent resemblance to Worzel Gummidge) led to moderate Labour voters worrying about the future of the party under their new Leader. In January 1981, four senior politicians on the right wing of the party defected, and formed the Social Democratic Party (Roy Jenkins, Shirley Williams, David Owen and William Rodgers, with Jenkins being elected as their first leader), which was joined by 28 Labour MPs. In the Tory safe seats of Corby and Glasgow Hillhead, Williams and Jenkins won by-elections to join the House of Commons. Concerned about Foot's popularity, a small group of left-wing allies of Foot met with him privately, and after much debate, convinced Foot to step aside, and endorsed another left-winger, Tony Benn. Benn narrowly beat Dennis Healey to become leader in October 1982. With the Tory lead narrowing, Benn could stand a chance of increasing Labour's seats, although outright victory looks unlikely. The SDP, now in an outright electoral Alliance with the Liberals could prove to be their undoing, tied with Labour in the polls

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37 minutes ago, LegolasRedbard said:

Thatcher's first term in office was a time of great social strife in the United Kingdom. Thatcher's main focus when it came to the economy was to control inflation, rather than unemployment. The raising of VAT to 15%, along with the general pressure on the economy hit businesses hard, and by the end of 1980, unemployment had risen to 2 million. With many commentators, and notably former Prime Minister Ted Heath, urging her to reverse her liberalization of the economy, Thatcher delivered a defiant speech at 1980's party conference, where she famously said:

 

"To those waiting with bated breath for that favourite media catchphrase, the 'U-turn', I have only one thing to say: 'You turn' if you want to. The lady's NOT for turning."

 

Ironically it was in 1980 that Mrs. Thatcher u-turned over another issue, and reversed her previous endorsement of higher defence spending, and began to make cuts, with one particular area of cuts being the Royal Navy, a move that would later come to haunt the Prime Minister. Thatcher also had to deal with riots in inner cities, and by Christmas 1981, Thatcher was being encouraged by higher-ups in her party to resign as Prime Minister. She rejected these suggestions, and by 1982, inflation had dropped from 18% to 8%, allowing interest rates to fall.

 

Thatcher also proved herself to be a staunch fighter against terrorism. In 1980, Iranian terrorists took over the Iranian Embassy in London, and Thatcher's authorization to take decisive action and order the SAS to storm the embassy with lethal force, created an image of a strong leader. Despite the hardships, many Britons supported the Prime Minister, and going into 1983, her approval rating was at 40%. Surprisingly, Thatcher called an early election for June 1983, hoping to capitalise on the strength of the economy and the weakness of the Labour Party

"A bottle of medicine helps the sugar go down." :P

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On 7/11/2018 at 12:09 PM, LegolasRedbard said:

TORIES WIN MAJORITY

Capture.PNG.0d036330f55a238a33b262f0922b7658.PNG

Margaret Thatcher has became the first female Prime Minister in British history, after leading the Conservative Party to a comfortable majority in the House of Commons. They gained 68 seats, with the governing Labour Party losing 58 seats. The Liberal Party mostly weathered the storm that the Thorpe Affair had caused, losing only 3 seats, while the Nationalist Parties combined won 5 seats, losing 7

liberal seats numbers same as vote %

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any place we could download these scenarios? I have the Canada version of PMI and it lacking scenarios is jarring to say the least

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2 hours ago, Ido said:

any place we could download these scenarios? I have the Canada version of PMI and it lacking scenarios is jarring to say the least

I highly doubt it. Anthony will want to string us up to buy an effectively redundant game engine just for official TheorySpark made scenarios alone (that almost certainly do work across the two games, given all fan made PMI scenarios do), and that way filling his coffers all the more...

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On ‎12‎/‎25‎/‎2018 at 6:11 PM, Ido said:

any place we could download these scenarios? I have the Canada version of PMI and it lacking scenarios is jarring to say the least

They are on the 270soft campaigns website, under the UK section

http://campaigns.270soft.com/category/prime-minister-infinity/u-k/

They will play on the Canada version as well, I am relatively sure

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(Trying this again)

 

CAMPAIGN OVERVIEW

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At the start of the campaign, Labour is almost tied with the SDP/Liberal Alliance for support, with the Tories 8 points ahead. Labour's leftward drift has left them in the dust. They'll be hoping that their decision to dump Michael Foot with the more charismatic, but equally as left-wing Tony Benn. Benn's chances at forming the next government, however, seem slim, and things are complicated slightly by the fact that Benn's seat has been abolished by boundary changes. He lost out at a shot at a safe seat and was selected as candidate for Bristol East, which was less of an issue before he became leader. Benn's struggles to win his seat highlight just how hard Labour has to fight to win - Bristol East's results should be a sign of how the night is going for Labour.

 

The Tories, although secure in their vote share, should not go into this election overly confident of victory. A swing of two or three percentage points to Labour during the campaign could put them in danger of a less than comfortable majority, perhaps only of ten or so. The threat, however, is exacerbated by the threat of the SDP/Liberal Alliance. Although primarily taking centre-left voters from the Labour Party, it cannot be understated how much of a threat they could pose to the government. The SDP took two safe Tory seats in by elections in 1981 and 82, and they prove a serious threat in the West Country, where a dozen seats could potentially go to the SDP. Will Mrs. Thatcher regret her decision to call a snap election?

 

The SDP/Liberal Alliance are polling at 21%, a massive achievement for a coalition formed only very recently. Their joint leadership of David Steel and Roy Jenkins, despite internal tensions, has proved to be effective, and the Alliance could even surpass Labour as the second largest party in terms of vote. In seats, however, the First Past The Post electoral system prevents them from gaining a proportionate number of seats, and in many areas they are only splitting the vote. Current polls only predict them gaining 5 new seats. A good night for them would be gains going into the double digits, with a gain of 25 seats the absolute best case outcome, with a terrible night being any losses, and potentially the loss of Shirley Williams in Crosby, with the Tories determined to win that seat back following their by-election loss, and even more shocking, the potential loss of one of their joint leaders, Roy Jenkins in Glassgow Hillhead, if Labour achieves a big enough swing.

 

There's still 69 days to the election, and everything to play for.

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41 days remaining until the election, and things haven't changed much in terms of percentage of the vote in our poll of polls:

 

29th April 1983

 

CON - 33% (+1)

LAB - 25% (+2)

ALL - 21% (-)

Undecideds - 17%

 

Although the percentage tracker shows that there has been little change, the seat change should be worrying for the Conservatives

 

(+/- last election)

 

CON - 347 seats (-7)

LAB - 228 seats (-24)

ALL - 25 seats (+1)

OTH - 19 seats

Undecided - 26 seats

 

Compared to the predictions of 365+ seats for the Tories at the beginning of the campaign, it is clear that the momentum in the campaign is moving away from the Tories, but where this support is going is not yet clear. Although there's been a bounce of 2% to Labour, the Tories have also gained a percentage point. Although the Tories should be worried by these figures, the Alliance should be worried even more. A gain of 1 seat is what our seat tracker says is likely at the moment. Labour is expected to gain Glasgow Hillhead from Roy Jenkins, with Crosby too close to call. Worryingly for Labour also, is that although Tony Benn is expected to retain his seat, he is expected to win by only a handful of votes.

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27 days until the election. Momentum is moving away from the Conservatives towards Labour, however it appears that more voters are going from Labour to the Alliance than they have gained from the Conservatives

 

13th May 1983

 

CON - 31% (-2)

LAB - 25% (-)

ALL - 22% (+1)

Undecided - 16%

 

When that is transferred into our prediction for the amount of seats won versus the last election

 

CON - 331 seats (-23)

LAB  - 242 seats (-10)

ALL - 29 seats (+5)

OTH - 26 seats

Undecided - 23 seats

 

These figures will be making a lot of people at CCHQ very nervous. Despite the Tories having a clear six point lead over Labour, they are 6 seats away from losing their overall majority. Although Labour won't have a chance at forming the government as things stand, the Tories would be forced to make some sort of deal with the other parties, perhaps the Ulster Unionists, to form the next government. The battleground for this election, it seems, isn't actually Labour/Tory marginals, but places like the West Country, where the Alliance could sweep Tory seats.

 

West Country Polls

 

CON -  37% (-2)

ALL - 33% (+3)

LAB - 12% (-2)

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With one final week of campaigning ahead, it looks as if the Tories have gained ground once more, with Labour losing votes and the Alliance failing to make ground

 

CON - 34% (+3)

LAB - 23% (-2)

ALL - 22% (-)

Undecided - 17%

In terms of seats...

 

CON - 357 seats (+3)

LAB - 216 seats (-36)

ALL - 27 seats (+3)

OTH - 23 seats

Undecided - 27 seats

 

It's looking more likely now that the Conservatives will win re-election. Worrying news also for Labour, as our seat tracker predicts that leader Tony Benn WILL lose his seat in Bristol East

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Hello, and welcome to our coverage of Election 1983. After two months of campaigning up and down the country, today the country has gone to the polls to vote on the future of the country. Mrs. Thatcher called this early election hoping to secure her majority in the face of weak opposition, and if our final opinion poll is correct, it suggests that she is on the way to doing this:

 

CON - 34% (-)

LAB - 24% (+1)

ALL - 22% (-)

 

We're predicting a seat count of anywhere over 360 seats for the Conservatives on that vote share, a major achievement and a landslide majority for Mrs. Thatcher.  The scene up and down the country is looking very poor for Labour. A snap poll in Tony Benn's constituency of Bristol East produced this shocking result:

 

CON - 35%

LAB - 26%

ALL - 20%

 

If this is right, then Labour will be without an immediate leader in the next parliament. Mr. Benn may be rueing his decision to turn down a safe seat in the interests of fighting in his old constituency's area. On the subject of party leaders losing their seats, it is looking like the Alliance may be losing at least one of their leaders. Whilst David Steel looks certain to hold his seat in Berwickshire, Glasgow Hillhead is too close to call, with Mr Jenkins not totally confident in holding his seat:

 

LAB - 29%

ALL - 29%

CON - 15%

 

The Tories stand a chance at standing as the only major party with a full set of leadership after tonight

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12:20 AM

 

Two and a half hours after the close of polls, we have our first gain of the evening, in the West Country seat of Yeovil. Former Royal Marine Paddy Ashdown has won the seat for the Alliance, beating Tory candidate David Martin by a considerable margin:

Capture.PNG.54a783b7d1827acd2f636377be994785.PNG

(AN: Interesting fact, David Martin is the uncle of Coldplay singer Chris Martin)

 

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BREAKING NEWS: Major blow for the Alliance, as founding member Shirley William loses her seat to the Conservatives

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With a majority of 5.1%, the result has not been in any doubt. Things are looking quite dicey for the Alliance, apparently Glasgow Hillhead is going to be a close result. If we look at the national vote share at the moment...

 

CON - 40%

LAB - 31%

ALL - 25%

OTH - 5%

 

Things are looking good for the Conservatives...

 

1.16 AM

 

BREAKING NEWS

 

Social Democratic Party Roy Jenkins has lost his seat to the Labour Party

Capture.PNG.c5779566aacd0fd61873661f9992a048.PNG

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2 AM, and the Tories have taken a 11% lead nationally, and are well ahead of Labour in terms of seats:

Capture.PNG.cd093d70f683767d0c4ee8e8d8de643c.PNG

Well it's been a dramatic night so far, with the loss of several high profile figures from the SDP, with three of their four founders losing their seats, with David Owen the only one remaining and a clear candidate for the leadership now. And things are only going to get more dramatic, it seems, as we go live now to Bristol East.

 

The candidates are assembled on stage, Tony Benn there with a smile on his face, with the Alliance candidate looking rather despondent. With the split between the Tory and Labour vote here, the Alliance had hoped that this seat could be one that they would win, cementing a good night for the party. However, it seems here, as with up and down the country, they aren't going to get what they want:

 

"I the returning officer for the Bristol East constituency do declare the result as follows... Benn, Tony - fourteen thousand, six hundred and twenty eight votes... Foster, Donn - ten thousand eight hundred and thirty three votes... Sayeed, Jonathan - seventeen-"

 

And the cheers erupting from the room confirm the fact that the Labour Party's worst nightmare has happened. Tony Benn, their leader, their best hope at forming the next government, has lost his seat to the Conservatives. I reckon there's probably quite a few bottles of champagne just been opened in CCHQ

Capture.PNG.ca015eb050bed132f250bf969b3792df.PNG

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