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jvikings1

Eurosceptic UK

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I'll start with 1979 and move on using the Eurosceptic Parties

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At 2:30, the Tories have 91 seats and 49.2% of the vote.  Labor has 59 and 38.7%.  National Front is polling at 0.9%.  Northern Ireland hasn't reported yet.

In Hackney South and Shoreditch, John Tyndal received 12.4% of the vote.

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1 minute ago, jvikings1 said:

At 2:30, the Tories have 91 seats and 49.2% of the vote.  Labor has 59 and 38.7%.  National Front is polling at 0.9%.  Northern Ireland hasn't reported yet.

In Hackney South and Shoreditch, John Tyndal received 12.4% of the vote.

What about the Liberals, SNP, and Plaid?

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1 minute ago, Patine said:

What about the Liberals, SNP, and Plaid?

They didn't have any seats at that point.

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Result:

Tories 450 52.9%

Labor 158 34.2%

Liberals 9 8%

UUP 5 0.6%

Independent 4 0.7%

PC 3 0.4%

DUP 3 0.2%

UUUP 1 0.1%

SDLP 1 0.4%

SNP 1 1.7%

Alliance 0.2%

Workers 0%

Ecology 0.1%

NF 0.6%

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What is the most pro-Immigration UK party?

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1 minute ago, vcczar said:

What is the most pro-Immigration UK party?

At the time of this election or right now irl?

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8 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

At the time of this election or right now irl?

IRL right now

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Just now, vcczar said:

IRL right now

Of the national parties, I'd say the Liberal Democrats.  The Labor Party is somewhat split on this which is why there was a Labor rebellion during Brexit (almost 1/3rd of Labor voters voted to Leave).  The left wing Nationalsit Parties (SNP, Plaid Cymnru, and Sinn Fein) are as well.  But, they are mostly focused with getting out of the UK.  The Green Party is as well, but it doesn't have much influence.

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1983

Tories: 380 39.3%

Labor: 188 25.3%

Alliance: 56 30.5%

UUP: 8 0.7%

DUP: 5 0.5%

SNP: 5 1.2%

PC: 4 0.4%

SDLP 3 0.5%

Independent: 1 0.5%

Ecology: 0.2%

Sinn Fein: 0.3%

Alliance (NI): 0.2%

Workers: 0.1%

NF: 0.2% (16.9% in Hackney South and Shoreditch)

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18 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

1983

Tories: 380 39.3%

Labor: 188 25.3%

Alliance: 56 30.5%

UUP: 8 0.7%

DUP: 5 0.5%

SNP: 5 1.2%

PC: 4 0.4%

SDLP 3 0.5%

Independent: 1 0.5%

Ecology: 0.2%

Sinn Fein: 0.3%

Alliance (NI): 0.2%

Workers: 0.1%

NF: 0.2% (16.9% in Hackney South and Shoreditch)

John Tyndel - what a frightening individual...

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2 hours ago, vcczar said:

IRL right now

Most likely the Greens, the Libdems have a large pro immigration stance but even they have gone against complete unfettered immigration in the past.

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1987

Tories: 350 41.4%

Labor: 245 33.9%

Alliance: 28 20.3%

DUP: 8 0.5% (4th in SW NI but took 2/4 seats; 2nd in NE NI but took the most seats)

UUP: 6 0.7%

SNP: 5 1.3%

Independent: 3 0.5% (John Tyndall elected in Hackney South and Shoreditch with 36.5% of the vote; Ian Anderson in 3rd in Newham South with 18.8% of the vote)

PC: 3 0.4%

SDLP: 1 0.4%

Sinn Fein: 1 0.3%

Alliance (NI): 0.3%

Workers: 0.1%

Green: 0.3%

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1992:

After a rise in Eurscepticism, due in part to success of Eurosceptic candidates, Margaret Thatcher survived a challenge and remained leader of the Tories.  

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Tyndall actually won a seat? According to Wikipedia, he didn't run in Hackney South and Shoreditch in 1987 (or anywhere else as far as I can tell).

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20 hours ago, RI Democrat said:

Tyndall actually won a seat? According to Wikipedia, he didn't run in Hackney South and Shoreditch in 1987 (or anywhere else as far as I can tell).

He didn't but since he did so well there in 1979, I had him run there again.  The, after he gained more  in 1983, I had him run for a 3rd time.

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On 11/07/2017 at 0:16 AM, jvikings1 said:

I'll start with 1979 and move on using the Eurosceptic Parties

Would you mind saying which parties you are playing as? As I'm sure you're aware, Euroscepticism embraces Labour in 1983 and the Greens in the 1980s but also the NF, BNP, and UKIP. Heck, in 2017, at least both of the main parties could be described as such.

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30 minutes ago, JDrakeify said:

Would you mind saying which parties you are playing as? As I'm sure you're aware, Euroscepticism embraces Labour in 1983 and the Greens in the 1980s but also the NF, BNP, and UKIP. Heck, in 2017, at least both of the main parties could be described as such.

Sure

I have played as the National Front and the DUP for the first 2 elections.  Then independent and DUP for 1987.  In 1992, I'll play as independent and DUP (and maybe Sinn Fein)

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1992

Tories: 398 45.6% (last poll showed a coalition with the DUP would be necessary)

Labor: 211 32.2%

Lib Dems: 12 14.6%

DUP: 9 0.5%

SNP: 7 2.1%

PC: 5 0.5%

UUP: 5 0.6%

SDLP: 2 0.5%

Independent: 1 1.8% (Tyndall wins re-election by 5.5%; Ian Anderson narrowly gets 3rd in Newham South with 26.6%; Dave Nellist narrowly looses his seat by 2% taking 31.8% of the vote)

Sinn Fein: 1 0.2% (narrowly lost Fermanagh and South Tyrone by 3%)

Liberal 0 0.5%

Alliance: 0 0.2%

Green: 0 0.7%

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Halfway through her term, Margaret Thatcher steps down as Prime Minister citing the advice of her doctor because of recent health issues.

The Tory leadership election was between John Major and John Redwood.  Major was narrowly elected, but that created a rift in the Conservative Party.  Some on the Eurosceptic side broke off from the Tory Party and joined the new and rising Eurosceptic party, UKIP.

On the Labor side, Tony Blair was elected leader of Labor. He faced some competition from Bryan Gould, who surprised many by actually being a challenge.  Many have seen this as a threat of disunity over the European issue much like what is going on within the Tory Party.

James Goldsmith has started the Referendum Party which aims to force a referendum on the UK's membership in the EU.

Tyndall is running a larger list of candidates as part of his BNP.

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1997

Labor: 49.1% 468

Tories: 27.3% 133

Lib Dems: 13.3% 20

DUP: 0.8% 12

SNP: 2.1% 7

PC: 0.5% 4

UUP: 0.5% 4

Referendum: 2.9% 3 (Jeffrey Titford wins by 0.5% in Harwich; John Aspinall wins by 3% in Folkestone and Hythe; George Gardiner wins reelection in Reigate by 13.5%)

Independent: 1.1% 2 (Dave Nellist was a little less than 4% away from retaking his seat)

BNP: 0.2% 2 (Tyndall wins reelection by 20%; Ian Anderson elected in Poplar and Canning Town by 17%;David King is second by 7.8% in Bethnal Green and Bow)

Liberal: 0.3% 1

Sinn Fein: 0.3% 1

UKIP: 0.5% 1 (Roger Knapman wins reelection by 1.6% as UKIP candidate);Farage gets 16.6% in Salisbury)

SDLP: 0.5% 1

Green: 0.2% 0

Alliance: 0.2% 0

Socialist Labor: 0.2% 0

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Roger Knapman is elected UKIP leader after Alan Aked steps down citing far right elements of the party.  Nigel Farage is elected chair of UKIP.  Jeffrey Titford is elected Deputy Leader.  George Gardiner is elected leader in the House of Commons

James Goldsmith dies shortly after the election.  His party merges with UKIP shortly after and all 3 MPs joined UKIPs ranks.  UKIP and the DUP form an agreement whiere the parties will work closely together (sort of an informal coalition).  There have been talks of a possible merger by the DUP and UUP.  The UUP doesn't have any safe seats left (2 seats threatened by DUP and 2 threatened by the Irish Republican parties).  Speculation is that the agreement will make sure current UUP MPs stay in their spots in exchange for a unified unionist ticket.  A small minority within UKIP is suggesting a unification or alliance with the BNP.  UKIP leadership have declined this as a possibility.

John Major steps down as leader of the Tories early on election night.  A leadership election will be held.  The media is speculating that a more Eurosceptic candidate will become the next leader because of recent Eurosceptic success.  There have even been rumors of talks with between the Tories and UKIP/DUP about a potential electoral alliance.

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William Hague has been elected leader of the Conservative Party.  This selection has been seen as a place holder while the party recovers from its divisions.  It is also seen as an attempt to win over voters who were with the Referendum Party and UKIP.  The rumors about a possible alliance between the Tories and the UKIP/DUP alliance have died down as major party officials in the Tory ranks have shot down that possibility.

There are rumors that Tyndall, the leader of the BNP, might be forced out of the leadership spot over some controversial statements which have caused his polls to tank.  Despite being re-elected with over 40% of the vote, he is now in third behind the Labor and Tory generic candidates.  There are also rumors he might step down rather than suffer a loss.  Nick Griffin, formally a part of the National Front, is rumored to be the person that opposition is unifying around.  He claims to want to move the party away from the Nazi image and into a position more like other Eurosceptic parties in Europe, specifically the Nation Front in France.

Charles Kennedy was elected as leader of the Lib Dems.  He is seen as a new and exciting face in the party.

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