Jump to content
270soft Forum
Sign in to follow this  
vcczar

If the South Never Joined the US -- A Playthrough

Recommended Posts

24. Franklin D. Roosevelt (NY), Progressive, 1933-1941: 

Roosevelt won on the promise that he'd flex more military muscle, while also pushing more Progressive reform. Roosevelt, who promised to turn the country up a notch, thrusting it into the 21st century as early as 1950. Many of his action were very controversial, but with a Progressive dominated Congress, he was able to pass nearly everything. This included government control of all banks, dropping the Gold Standard for fiat currency, increasing the number of Supreme Court Justices to 12, and the policy of intervening in the world for humanitarian reasons. FDR also presided over the direct election of Senators. In an effort to sap the strength of America's enemies, FDR signed the most lenient immigration law--the "Easy Citizenship Act," which gave any immigrant automatic citizenship after 5 years of full employment, good behavior, or military service for 4 years. Additionally, factory housing or military housing was provided, along with a job, to any immigrant opting for factory work or military work. FDR also sapped enemy strength by paying the greatest minds of Europe and Asia to work in America's laboratories, think tanks, universities, etc. A Time Magazine report found that 87 of the 100 top Global Thinkers of 1940 resided in America, while in 1934, 48 did, which was still the most for any country. FDR ordered a huge buildup in Space, rocket, and medical technology, saying the country would soon eliminate most fatal diseases, and would send a man to the Moon by 1950. FDR required government service at home or abroad for all US citizens. His huge transportation infrastructure project called for required highways linking up every city of over 25,000 people, and a required metro system (to cut down pollution, traffice and maintain walkability) for all cities of over 50,000 people, with metro system transition to high speed rail when traveling between cities. FDR passed the most complete Disability Law to date, which insured that all disabled persons unable to work full time, would be without the economic fears caused by their disabilities.  He also created and increased a pension system for all middle and lower class Americans over the age of 60, with the age to be adjusted to the average life span in the future. FDR came under some fire, even though only 20% of Americans identify as religious, for refusing religious building in public space, but allowed only on private properties. FDR also called for technology that would liberate humankind from boring or enslaving work. In foreign policy, FDR went fully into the war between Mexico and the European powers. After several setbacks due to inexperience of military activities by the country, America was able to throw Europe out of the Northwestern Hemisphere by sheer numbers by 1939. However, Europe, newly allied with China, kept returning. By 1940, Canada joined the European forces upon the election of an Anti-American candidate. In the election of 1940, the cost of FDR's policies were worrying economist, and some Americans, while initially overwhelmingly supportive of FDR's military intervention, were now afraid of a prolonged war, since they had been used to harmony for generations. FDR, who was still popular, planned on running for reelection, but after a near fatal stroke in early 1940, he opted not to run, allowing for an easy victory for the Federalists, since it was understood that the best of FDR's policies would stay intact by the new administration 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25. Robert Taft (OH), Federalist, 1941-1953:

Taft took office, promising to uphold the better parts of Roosevelt's policies, but also promised to end the War with Europe. By 1942, Taft had reached an agreement with European and Asian powers, which prohibited any other power from influencing the Northwestern hemisphere. Additionally an arms and navy reduction was agreed upon for every country. Trade agreements were made, requiring the US to be somewhat flexible, so that the other countries did not feel threatened by American trade dominance. Tariffs were adjusted in a way that promised an American lead in many areas of manufacturing. While the treaties ended the war, none of the countries involved were entirely happy. Taft then announced a renewed policy of isolationism, and exited the United Nations. Domestically, Taft cut taxes, and undid much of the more minor FDR domestic programs. The only major initiatives Taft undid was FDR's lenient immigration policy, required national service, and the payment for global thinkers. Taft's greatest moment was his declaration of a limited government in which he stated that American of the day was "not possessed by the gimmickry of religion and superstition as many are in other countries. All of our citizens are informed, cultured, logical, scientific, humanitarian. We need not fear the local governments of resorting to provincial barbarism, selfishness and ignorance. We are learned enough to govern ourselves." This became known as the Citizen's Day of Independence. Later, Taft admitted to worried Progressives that it was because of progressives modernizing our society that limited government is even possible, "because now equality, freedom, and the fulfillment of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness can be guaranteed for all in even the most remote towns of our country." Ultimately, Taft became popular by voters of both ideologies. Progressives for his sincere acceptance of some of  their values and recognition of their accomplishments beneficial to the country, and by Federalists for his adherence to relative fiscal spending, and desire for limiting the government in people's lives. Taft died soon after his last term ended. His death also marked the death of the Federalist Party, which seemed to Conservatives as being only light version of the Progressives. A new party, the Conservative Party was founded by Eugene McCarthy of Wisconsin, who would later die of alcoholism. The mantle was then taken by Barry Goldwater of Arizona. Many former Federalists joined the Progressives, while the rest went with the Conservatives. The diluting of the Progressives with former Federalists, eventually led to a slightly less pure form of Progressivism. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

continued...

26. Harry S Truman (MO), 1953-1957, Progressive: 

Truman's presidency was mostly uneventful. He struggled to restrain himself in the era of Taftian-limited government and Taftian-isolationism. As a moderate, he accepted some elements of Taftian philosophy, but as a natural interventionist, he made efforts to reintegrate America into the world scene. His only movement, however, was regaining US membership to the UN, after an absence of nearly a decade. Domestically, he made no original moves, except requiring the updating technologies in government-controlled areas, including the national metro systems. He also increased funding into space exploration, and presided over the first Moon landing in 1954 (four years after FDR's predicted landing date). Truman announced that America had plans to explore the other planets when practical. Underwhelmed by the presidency during a time of relative bliss and peace, Truman declined a second term, despite his popularity. 

27. Averill Harriman (NY), 1957-1961, Progressive:

Harriman easily won the election, as he ran on Truman's service. Like Truman, he reluctantly accepted Taftian-limited government, but not Taftian-isolationism. Under Harriman, the country expanded their protectorate status over the Northwestern hemisphere to include naval protection of ships from any country in that sphere. He also secretly worked with South American to ween their dependence on Europe and Asia, offering them good that were cheaper and could arrive much more quickly. The agreement leaked to China, which by this time was the competing power in the World. Harriman denied such talks existed, despite accurate accounts by Chinese spies. The episode increased tension. Harriman, anticipating a potential war, improved relations with European powers, mostly through trade deals, hoping to intimidate China from beginning a potential war. While America was technologically more advanced, China had a larger population and a history of successful warfare. Harriman declined to run for a second term. During the last months of his presidency, Harriman called for a renewed effort of local government in accepting federal aid in making further progressive domestic reform, stating, "Progress must always flow. We cannot rest on our laurels. Each generations is a new progressive age, which must address and anticipate new challenges." The new challenges dealt mostly with drugs, healthcare, urban congestion, general uncleanliness, election reform, corruption, education reform, technology taking jobs, overpopulation in certain areas, and general boredom with American politics. Harriman wanted renewed interest in national politics.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28. John F. Kennedy (MA), 1961-1969, Progressive:

 
JFK is easily elected president since the opposing party, the newly created Conservative Party, was still trying to build a national organization that could compete. JFK ran on Harriman's suggestion for a new progressive activism in the domestic sphere, and a shift away from Taftian limited government, and away from Taftian isolationism, both areas that the Conservative opted to pick up on. Under JFK, a new department of government workers were sent to new HQs built in every city with a population of 50,000 people. These departments were government mandated rehab centers, that also put those in rehab to work, cleaning the cities. JFK also approved of legislation requiring business and property owners to clean the streets, sidewalks and their own property every day. While initially unpopular, these measures proved popular by the end of Kennedy's presidency. However, criminal organizations briefly escalated violence in retaliation to JFK's successful implementation of national rehab centers. JFK's next move was to work on traffic congestion, which slowed down commerce, and reduced the quality of life. He put the people to work by constructing modernized highway systems of 8 lanes, including a protected lane without a speed limit, and a lane specifically for 18-wheelers. This national highway system was not completed until 1973. Additionally, JFK mandated that all healthy individuals with access to metro systems use them; although, one could easily purchase or apply to work around this. JFK updated the metro systems for efficiency for this purpose. By the 1970s, approximately 60% of full-time working adults in cities of over 100,000 were using public transportation (mostly trains and subways) to get to work. In foreign policy, JFK took a bolder stance in international affairs, forcing the UN to put the US in every UN committee. His role in trade deals and at international gatherings was considered by some as being too aggressive. JFK was said to legitimately fear the rise of China, and his time as president saw an increased animosity between the two powers; although, war was never on the table. His behavior, while strengthening relations with some European powers, caused some countries to fear America's international ambition, and led to some countries increasing their relations with China. Rather than running for a 3rd term, JFK announced his younger brother Robert F. Kennedy as his successor. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29. Robert F. Kennedy (NY), 1969-1973, Progressive:

JFK's brother easily won election, as the Conservative Party campaigned solely on limited government, and had very little ideas in a country with a progressive culture of ideas. Barry Goldwater resigned as nominal leader of the Conservative Party, handing the party over to Ronald Reagan, who was a vocal critic of RFK throughout the new president's administration. On top of Reagan's attacks, RFK's prickly personality with senators, made much of the senators and his own cabinet often defy him. However, when speaking with the people, he was such a benevolent voice, that his popularity remained high, despite drama within the government. He did make some notable changes. In foreign policy, he softened his brother's aggressive tone, while keeping American thoroughly in charge overseas. Many credit RFK with defusing a possible war with China; although, the Chinese government maintained a cool distance with America. RFK failed in attempts at Healthcare laws, technology laws, and education laws. He did make some real changes, however. To curb overpopulation in cities, he provided benefits and government job opportunities for people will to populate cities with a population of less than 100,000 people. This led to a great migration, as approximately 9 million Americans changed their location in 1970, and several million each year thereafter. Crime escalated tremendously in the first half of RFK's term as he inaugurated a full crackdown on organized crime. By 1975, organized crime was a shadow of what it once was. He also worked to get election and political reform passed, abolishing the electoral college, and redistricting voting districts to better represent the people. Tired of the drama of politics, RFK retired, but not before campaigning for his brother, Ted Kennedy, for president. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

30. Ted Kennedy (MA), 1973-1981, Progressive:

Ted Kennedy narrowly defeats Conservative Party candidate in both the 1972 and 1976 elections. In office, Kennedy continued the policies of both of his brothers, and established three parts of the policies that they could not get passed through Congress. Under Ted Kennedy, America established an affordable mandated, single-payer, universal healthcare. He also established the requirement that all technology companies involved in labor-based technologies must work with labor laws in the hopes of creating technologies that liberate humankind from work that is boring and enslaving. Kennedy also established a 30 hour work week, and a required 4 weeks of vacation/leave a year. In education, government education facilities were established in every city to educate children from daycare to college. All citizens are required to go to a technical college or academic college, if they are not employed or in the military. Kennedy also raised the requirements for passing classes for all grades in grade school, and for colleges. In foreign policy, Kennedy was considered too weak in establishing pro-American trade deals, as he was seen as focusing too much in finding a balance, which led to the assumption that other powers were taking advantage of him. Despite attempts at harmony, China consistently aimed at bullying America at international summits and meetings. China, a rising power, was nearly economically on par with China, and was attempting to win over Europe to their sphere. Kennedy, for the most part, chose to ignore their language or appease them, since he couldn't afford much of a military or national defense budget, since the Three Kennedys Domestic Policies were so expensive. The combination of a weak foreign policy and Kennedy's own scandals involving his personal life made it nearly impossible for Kennedy to seek a 3rd term. The family sought other viable Kennedys among their clans, but their children were under age, and polls showed that former presidents JFK and RFK were unlikely to win a non-consecutive term. Thus, brother-in-law Sargent Shriver was sent out to face perennial Conservative Party nominee Ronald Reagan, who now had a bold and active platform, in the election of 1980. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

31. Ronald Reagan (CA), 1981-1989, Conservative: 

After several attempts at the presidency, Ronald Reagan finally wins, becoming the first president of the Conservative Party. Reagan runs under the mission of putting China in its place and dismantling the federal government from domestic roles, except where it is "absolutely necessary." Throughout campaign, Reagan hearkened back to Taftian Limited Government and his message that "America's superior culture of secular reason, and it's embrace of both humanitarianism and science, and its drive for education and a high quality of life for all, means that Americans can govern themselves, without the need of federal government expenses." Reagan hammered the three Kennedys for driving taxes up to 70% for everyone (poverty was basically non-existent in this alternative America) in the course of their presidency. During his first term, Reagan focused primarily on foreign policy, allowing the Kennedy policies to stay; albeit with a smaller budget. The policies were not unpopular, but the taxation for them was, so Reagan slowly limited the budget to keep his polls high, but did not strip the programs. In foreign policy, Reagan ended all trade deals with China, and gave very favorable deals to all the other major economies. When China threatened war, Reagan dared them to attack, saying, "You may have a larger military, but our friends in commerce will protect us long enough to create a military much larger, and much more replaceable than yours." China stepped down, and then Reagan offered better trade deals if other countries would end all trade with China. The major economies mostly followed, and China's economy tanked, but this also caused the world economy to tank. Reagan gambled that China, which was internally struggling to stay unified, would collapse, and then he could reestablish trade with other countries. 

Going into the 1984 election, Reagan's population dive bombed because of the economic circumstances contrived by Reagan. The Kennedys tried to convince Congress to change the election laws to allow JFK, Jr., who was under 35, to run. RFK briefly considered running, but polls suggested he wouldn't win. They then contacted all of their cousins and sisters, but none seemed politically ready. Brother-in-Law Sargent Shriver, who had lost to Reagan in 1980, was nominated again. Reagan attacked Shriver as a reluctant tool of the Kennedys. Ultimately, this tactic work, allowing a narrow victory for Reagan, despite his unpopularity. Reagan, who had no intentions of a 3rd term, made the most of his second term. He and allied major economies tightened the grip on China until it shattered into several countries, mostly along traditional states from their history. Following this, he opened several trade deal with each of the various states. The economy improved slowly, but was never back to normal until 2000. Domestically, Reagan shifted all domestic responsibilities to the states (actually administrative districts, since states were altered in the 19th century). He helped pass a law that confirmed that these regional governments had full control on domestic law, so long as it didn't interfere with federal law. The law also established that a regional government could petition the Federal Government for aid, be it money, manpower or supplies. With the regions in firm control, Reagan cut Federal Taxes by 75%. 

Leading up to the 1988 election, Reagan's policies were greatly undermining his political party. First, since China was no longer to be feared, he reneged on the generous trade policies, and started demanding pro-American trade, much to the detriment of the other party (at least, relative to the former agreements). The international community was livid. Domestically, the regional governments were having a hard time making the transition to taking charge on what were formally federally-controlled domestic policies. As regional differences were practically nil, as far as social issues, the governments could be trusted to take care of the interest of all people, but some regions had more money than others to support their people. Reagan, who didn't believe in sharing the wealth, refused to aid the Southern region (former Southern US), and Middle Region (what some call fly over country today). Thus in 1992, despite having been elated that he destroyed China, the South, Middle America, and the always slightly more Progressive West Coast and New England regions were soundly against the Conservative. This left his support only in Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Mountain States and Southwest (which recently took Texas from the South). In short, the Conservative Party lost in a landslide in 1988; however, Reagan's legacy in destroying China and his move to decentralize domestic policy ultimately improved his legacy over time. He was never considered a great president, since he seriously hurt America's reputation overseas and also because many thought he ignored the American people in his last months of his presidency. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were the states that China broke into like the ones that were around right before Japanese invasion/WW2?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jvikings1 said:

Were the states that China broke into like the ones that were around right before Japanese invasion/WW2?

No, I imagine them being much more along ancient boundaries. Probably this: https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-0a25c219fa6f0f13be5db7f4c6c1305c

But with Hong Kong split off. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@CalebsParadox @President Garrett Walker

It's still going. I just have to have the time free to come up with alternative universe of America for each of these presidents. It actually gets harder the closer I get to the present, since this alternative US is much more advanced in about every way. This may get updated anytime between now and in about 4 days. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

32. Michael Dukakis (MA), 1989-1993, Progressive: 

Dukakis won an easy election, with a focus on modernization and preparing not only America, but the world, for the next step in the timeline of humanity. During the Reagan Presidency, Progressives became more and more focused on the future of the world and life itself, especially in light of astronomers finding life on planets that very much resembled our own. The frightening belief was that astronomers and physicists and intellectuals believed that Earth could probably launch a projectile to these other planets with precision accuracy in 100 years, and that if we could do this, then they may be able to as well. Worse yet, what if they were more advanced, and more malicious than us? 

As such, Dukakis set up a plan to get the world working together for common threats to humanity and to the planet. He started out by reaching out to fragmented China, and aiding them in their recovery as each Chinese state built up their separate governments. Other countries joined in, and as by product, the economy improved. 

Dukakis also presided during the introduction of the internet, which he anticipated and provided laws that guaranteed its neutrality, improvement, and its cost efficiency. He also advocated and signed a law that required all businesses to sell only goods made at the highest possible quality. Meaning, if a car company was capable of making a car that can last a lifetime, it aught to do that, rather than make cheaply made cars, that have to often be replace. This law, The Maximal Quality Act, proved immensely popular on campaign. 

However, the costs of goods increased, and the supply couldn't meet the demand in some areas. Dukakis, believe it would sort itself out, but he had no way of appeasing voters in the meantime. Fearing the Conservatives could retake the White House, Dukakis promised a single term, and focused on humanitarian and planetary improvements, of which he believed the Maximal Quality Act would eventually play a huge role. Dukakis campaigned for Jerry Brown of California for the next election. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll get back to this after I update the historical scenarios. I already have planned out what I will say about the remaining candidates. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2017‎-‎07‎-‎20 at 0:47 PM, vcczar said:

I'll get back to this after I update the historical scenarios. I already have planned out what I will say about the remaining candidates. 

I just stumbled across the synopsis of an old Alternate History book from 1953 called "Bring the Jubilee" by a Ward Moore that's so ridiculously biased, unrealistic, and smacking of pure wish fullfilment it's not even funny. I mention this here because of Alternate History fiction where the Northern and Southern U.S. become and grow as different nations (though unlike your project here, but more like, say some of Harry Turtledove's works, the changing point is at the U.S. Civil War, not before the ratification of the Constitution). Moore's view is that the Confederacy, after decisively winning the Battle of Gettysburg and forcing the Union to recoginize it's independence, then grow into a huge cultural, intellectual, economic, and miltary superpower, conquering all of Latin American and many Pacific Islands, such as Hawaii, with cities like one created by a fusio of Baltimore, Washington, and Alexandria (all of which fall on their side of the map, apparently) and "Leeburg" (the renamed Mexico City), taking the place of Paris as the major cultural, academic, artisitc centres of the world at the turn of the 20th Century, with their princiapal rival on the whole globe being the German Union, a Hohenzollern-Habsburg fusion that dominates Europe totally after the "Emperor's War" of 1914-1916. The Union is described as a "dirt-poor, backward, internally-squabbling, rump state in permanent envy of the glories achieved by the South." I've made criticisms, even a few sharp ones, of inaccuracies and unrealisms in Alternate History threads on this sub-forum, but this book (and just the synopsis, I might add) just left me gobsmacked and incredulous...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Patine said:

I just stumbled across the synopsis of an old Alternate History book from 1953 called "Bring the Jubilee" by a Ward Moore that's so ridiculously biased, unrealistic, and smacking of pure wish fullfilment it's not even funny. I mention this here because of Alternate History fiction where the Northern and Southern U.S. become and grow as different nations (though unlike your project here, but more like, say some of Harry Turtledove's works, the changing point is at the U.S. Civil War, not before the ratification of the Constitution). Moore's view is that the Confederacy, after decisively winning the Battle of Gettysburg and forcing the Union to recoginize it's independence, then grow into a huge cultural, intellectual, economic, and miltary superpower, conquering all of Latin American and many Pacific Islands, such as Hawaii, with cities like one created by a fusio of Baltimore, Washington, and Alexandria (all of which fall on their side of the map, apparently) and "Leeburg" (the renamed Mexico City), taking the place of Paris as the major cultural, academic, artisitc centres of the world at the turn of the 20th Century, with their princiapal rival on the whole globe being the German Union, a Hohenzollern-Habsburg fusion that dominates Europe totally after the "Emperor's War" of 1914-1916. The Union is described as a "dirt-poor, backward, internally-squabbling, rump state in permanent envy of the glories achieved by the South." I've made criticisms, even a few sharp ones, of inaccuracies and unrealisms in Alternate History threads on this sub-forum, but this book (and just the synopsis, I might add) just left me gobsmacked and incredulous...

There are a few authors that do that. They generally have all the Civil War generals and their descendants also becoming president, as if the South was composed of only 20 families. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×