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Bruce Fischer

An Electoral History of the United States of America

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Presidential Election of 1856: Wrap Up

Electoral vote (actually exactly the same as IRL 1856):

Capture.PNG.96035d0ae8f71cd9bcf8be72bbe0f6d5.PNG

Popular vote:

Pierce/Douglas: 2,256,735, 51.9%

Fremont/Dayton: 1,195,068, 27.5%

Fillmore: 900,526, 20.7%

(Played as: Pierce)

Congress

House:

Democrats: 133 (up 50)

Republicans: 90 (down 10)

Know-Nothings: 14 (down 37)

Senate:

Democrats: 34 (up 1)

Republicans: 15 (up 12)

Whigs: 3 (down 11)

Know-Nothings: 2 (up 1)

Free-Soilers: 1 (down 1)

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Pierce Cabinet, 1857-1861

President: Franklin Pierce

Vice President: Stephen A. Douglas

Secretary of State: Lewis Cass

Secretary of Treasury: Howell Cobb

Secretary of War: Jefferson Davis

Attorney General: Edwin Stanton

Postmaster General: Aaron Brown

Secretary of the Navy: Isaac Toucey

Secretary of the Interior: Jacob Thompson

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Honestly, the President and Vice President being forbidden lovers sounds like something out of fanfiction. But that would have been really interesting.

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Pierce/Douglas Term, 1857-1861

(trying a new format with this one too)

1857

President Pierce and Vice President Douglas are inaugurated again. Shortly afterwards, the Supreme Court handed down their opinion in the Dred Scott case, further increasing tensions over slavery. The Panic of 1857 also did not help Pierce's predicament. The Bleeding Kansas conflict also started this year. Pierce came to regret seeking (and winning) a second term.

1858

Bleeding Kansas remains a problem for Pierce for most of the year, taking up almost all of his time, to his dismay. Rumor has it that he is still depressed from his child's death several years ago, and is extremely stressed due to his administration not going anything like how he wanted; there is some speculation that he may resign. Minnesota joins the Union.

Midterms

House:

Republican: 140 (up 50)

Democrats: 98 (down 35)

Know-Nothings: merged with Republicans

Senate:

Republicans: 34 (up 19)

Democrats: 32 (down 2)

Whigs: merged with Republicans

Free-Soilers: merged with Republicans

Know-Nothings: merged with Republicans

 

1859

Shortly after the new Republican Congress came into office, President Pierce had had enough. He resigned on January 17th, and his Vice President, Stephen Douglas, took office as the 12th President of the United States. President Douglas promised to do nothing and wait until he was either voted out of office in 1860 or voted in for his own term before doing anything. In other news, Oregon joins the Union.

1860

President Douglas still doesn't do anything. He's unpopular and yet still runs for his own term. He is warned that states might succeed if the Republican candidate wins, and asks Congress to revitalize the neglected military and prepare to potentially send troops into revolting states. Congress complies.

1861

Kansas joins the Union.

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Presidential Election of 1860: Start

Senator Seward is almost certain that he'll be the next President of the United States. He's been preparing for this for over a decade. He pushed Abraham Lincoln out at the convention (with the promise that he would be made Attorney General, of course) which had led to a narrow Seward victory there. To Seward's chagrin, Benjamin Wade had been nominated for Vice President by the Republicans, but no matter. War was likely to break out if anyone short of Jefferson Davis was elected President. The next President will have a lot on his plate.

The current President, Stephen Douglas, is not going to win, plain and simple. The Democrats fractured along sectional lines, with the President running in the North and John C. Breckinridge running for the South. John Crittenden was running too, as a "Constitutional Unionist," whatever the hell that means. The Constitution's great, but the Union is perhaps not salvageable.

No matter. Seward is prepared. But now, he waits for the first calls to be made. He anxiously awaits the inevitable telegrams.

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As Seward waits, he gets the first calls of the night:

SEWARD WINS IN, NY, CRITTENDEN WINS KY, TN, MO

Seward nods his head; these were expected, save Missouri; that was supposed to go for the President. Oh well.

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President Douglas is infuriated. "I should have taken Missouri!" he screams to no one in particular.

Well, there's always New Jersey, the state where he had the widest lead prior to the election.

A piece of paper is handed to the President:

SEWARD WINS NJ, PA, OH, NEW ENGLAND

The President will not win. Infuriated, he tries to go to sleep.

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John C. Breckinridge is pleased with his electoral performance so far. He just got a series of telegrams telling him that he has won every state below the Mason-Dixon line besides Kentucky, Tennessee, and Missouri. It wasn't enough, but maybe he'd win a state or two in an upset...

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Seward received another telegram, just after midnight:

SEWARD WINS WI

That puts him at 151 electoral votes. 152 is a majority.

One more vote.

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SEWARD TAKES IL, MI, IA, MN, IS NEXT POTUS

Seward smiles. Finally, his time had come.

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Presidential Election of 1860: Wrap-up

Electoral vote:

Capture.PNG.23d996bc3f98ef2b05fc57e7a22600f8.PNG

Popular vote:

Seward/Wade: 1,573,775, 32.7%

Breckinridge/Lane: 1,133,344, 23.6% 

Douglas/Johnson: 1,066,112, 22.2%

Crittenden/Bell: 942,440, 19.6%

Liberty party nobodies: 90,881, 1.9%

(Played as: Seward)

Congress

House:

Republicans: 108 (down 32)

Democrats: 45 (down 53)

Constitutional Union: 30 (up 30)

Senate:

Republicans: 30 (down 4)

Democrats: 14 (down 18)

Unionist: 4 (up 4)

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Seward Cabinet, 1861-1865

President: William Seward

Vice President: Benjamin Wade

Secretary of State: John C. Fremont

Secretary of Treasury: Salmon P. Chase

Secretary of War: Simon Cameron

Attorney General: Abraham Lincoln

Postmaster General: Montgomery Blair

Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles

Secretary of the Interior: John Palmer Usher

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Seward/Wade Term, 1861-1865

1861

Before Seward and Wade are even inaugurated, 7 states secede from the Union and form the Confederate States of America. After their inauguration, President Seward does not recognize them as a sovereign nation but still commands the army to fight against them. 4 more states secede; the nation is embroiled in a civil war for the first time in its history. Secretary of State John Fremont was sent to Europe to prevent the war from becoming an international one. Confederate ports were blockaded and any slaves that were captured were set free. The war took up almost all of the President's time.

1862

The war was not ending as quickly as Seward had hoped, though he was strategizing with America's best military minds and was confident that the war would not last longer than 5 years at the very most. New taxes, a draft, and the suspension of habeas corpus happen in this year, all of which, combined with the war, are unpopular. To distract from this, President Seward announced that he would like to purchase Alaska from Russia if given the chance. Russia replied that it would consider the request but not until the civil war was over. Seward issues the Emancipation Proclamation this year as well, but it does not go into effect until January 1, 1863.

Midterms

House:

Republicans: 87 (down 21)

Democrats: 72 (up 27)

Unionists: 25 (down 5)

Senate:

Republicans: 31 (up 1)

Democrats: 10 (down 4) 

Unionists: 4 (no change)

Unconditional Unionists: 3 (up 3) 

 

1863

The Emancipation Proclamation goes into effect, freeing every slave in any state in rebellion against the Union. The Union Army makes gains and a clear path to victory starts to become clear, though not assured by any means. After Pickett's Charge in July, the Confederate paths to victory got much harder. The battle of Gettysburg happens in November, and President Seward delivers the Gettysburg Address (which is much, much different than IRL but still follows the same broad theme and is still regarded as one of the greatest Presidential speeches of all time). Sadly, an angry man with Confederate sympathies shot and killed Seward on November 22, 1863, leading to Vice President Wade becoming President of the United States. In other news, West Virginia is captured and becomes its own state, entering the Union in June.

1864

President Wade works very hard to continue the war effort, which is by this time going quite well for the Union. He puts Ulysses S. Grant in charge of all the Union armies, and he does a remarkably good job at commanding those armies. President Wade also announces that he will run for President himself. Nevada enters the Union.

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Presidential Election of 1864: Start

President Wade is afraid he might lose.

He's a President who took over when the old President died. That President only won 32% of the vote in his election, and the country broke apart afterwards. He couldn't even pick up the pieces without someone killing him.

Wade has concerned himself with finishing cleaning up that mess. The war is going well! Victory might even be sealed before the inauguration in March! However, Wade can't properly capitalize on that success for two reasons: if he stops strategizing and coordinating war efforts to campaign, he could lose the war, and if he loses the war he loses the election. The other reason? There's a massive "draft Grant" movement; people truly energized by the way the war is going are writing in General Ulysses S. Grant rather than voting for the Commander-in-Chief. Now, Grant has told them that he wouldn't accept the Presidency even if he won outright, but that hasn't stopped his supporters.

It does help that Wade's running against General McClellan.

Wade is uneasy as he awaits the results of the election.

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General McClellan thinks he stands a chance at victory.

Wade wasn't able to campaign at all, and neither could McClellan, so this was merely a battle of personalities and accomplishments. McClellan was betting that his status as an active-duty General was enough to usurp the current Commander-in-Chief.

He gets a telegram:

WADE TAKES IN, McCLELLAN TAKES KY

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President Wade gets a telegram that unsettles him mildly:

WADE TAKES MD, WV; McCLELLAN TAKES OH, NJ, DE

McClellan was ahead, but the night is still young.

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McClellan smiles as a telegram announces a large number of recently called states:

WADE WINS ME, VT, MA, RI; McCLELLAND TAKES NH, NY, PA, CT

That leaves him with 112 and the President with only 53! With 117 being a majority, McClellan is jubilant; he only needs 5 more votes and he's the next President of the United States, a fact he proudly tells his wife.

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Wade is very concerned. He knows he needs to win almost every single state in order to win his own term. He's nervous. The next calls come in:

WADE TAKES MI, WI, MN, IA, MO, KS. IL TOO CLOSE TO CALL

He'd swept the Midwest. The President now sits on 95 electoral votes. Getting closer to what he wants, but if Illinois goes to McClellan, it's all over...

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McClellan is getting a bit nervous, as Illinois was still too close to call when he last received an update on the state at around 4AM. He gets another one:

WADE TAKES NV, OR, CA

The election is coming down to Illinois. McClellan swears. The President had a 4,000 vote lead last he heard. Maybe he'd prevail, but it looks like he has lost...

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12,655 votes.

That was the margin in the state of Illinois.

President Wade cheered; he was getting a full term for himself.

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2 minutes ago, President Garrett Walker said:

McClelland is getting a bit nervous, as Illinois was still too close to call when he last received an update on the state at around 4AM. He gets another one:

WADE TAKES NV, OR, CA

The election is coming down to Illinois. McClelland swears. The President had a 4,000 vote lead last he heard. Maybe he'd prevail, but it looks like he has lost...

I believe you mean McClellan, this poor guy is sweating his balls off in anticipation of the results and can't even get his name spelled right!:P

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1 minute ago, Reagan04 said:

I believe you mean McClellan, this poor guy is sweating his balls off in anticipation of the results and can't even get his name spelled right!:P

WHOOPS, fixed way too many cases of this error in the above posts :P

(at least I know someone's reading :P)

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7 minutes ago, President Garrett Walker said:

WHOOPS, fixed way too many cases of this error in the above posts :P

(at least I know someone's reading :P)

Kek, yes I love this series.

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1864 Presidential Election: Wrap-Up

Electoral vote (this was actually almost an upset because Wade was projected to win 222 votes the week before the election):

Capture.PNG.3663ca37a7950417f753c3ea8572d1bf.PNG

Popular vote:

Wade/Fremont: 2,237,641, 49.9%

McClellan/Pendleton: 1,870,222, 41.7%

Ulysses S. Grant (write-in): 375,654, 8.4%

(Played as: Wade)

Congress

House:

Republicans: 137 (up 50)

Democrats: 38 (down 34)

Unionists: 18 (down 8)

Senate:

Republicans: 37 (up 6)

Democrats: 9 (down 1)

Unionists: 1 (down 3)

Unconditional Unionists: 1 (down 2)

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8 minutes ago, Reagan04 said:

Kek, yes I love this series.

OK cool, thanks! I guess people read this and don't reply (part of me doesn't want them to because then it messes up the format a little bit but part of me wants to make sure I'm not making this in vain)

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