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President Garrett Walker

An Electoral History of the United States of America

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Congressional Vote for President, 1801

House vote for President
MA: Burr
VT: Burr
NH: Burr
RI: Burr
CT: Burr
NY: Burr
NJ: Burr
PA: Jefferson
MD: Jefferson
DE: Jefferson
VA: Jefferson
KY: Jefferson
TN: Jefferson
NC: Jefferson
SC: Jefferson
GA: Jefferson

Total:
Jefferson: 9
Burr: 7

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Jefferson Cabinet, 1801-1805

President: Thomas Jefferson

Vice President: Aaron Burr

 

Secretary of State: Elbridge Gerry

Secretary of Treasury: Albert Gallatin

Secretary of War: James Monroe

Attorney General: Caesar A. Rodney

Secretary of the Navy: Robert Smith

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I don't believe the Senate would have voted for VP in this situation.

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8 minutes ago, jvikings1 said:

I don't believe the Senate would have voted for VP in this situation.

Yes you are right, fixing it now. The loser of the House vote (Burr in this case) would become VP, correct?

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Jefferson Term, 1801-1805

  • March 4, 1801: President Jefferson and Vice President Burr inaugurated
  • March 1801: Jefferson reshuffles a few Cabinet members, and continues his economic policies from his first term
  • May 1801: Jefferson’s Cabinet votes to send naval forces to the Mediterranean to intimidate Tripoli; escalates into Barbary War
  • March 16, 1802: US Military Academy at West Point established in the Military Peace Establishment Act, which also does other things
  • October 1802: Jefferson again calls on states to institute universal white male suffrage
  • Circa 1803: Ohio joins the Union

Midterms

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 103 (up 35)

Federalists: 39 (up 1)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 22 (up 7)

Federalists: 9 (down 8)

Vacant: 1

  • December 9, 1803: 12th Amendment approved by Congress, establishes a new procedure for electing Presidents and Vice Presidents (same as IRL)
  • 1803: Louisiana territory purchased from France
  • September 1803: Jefferson calls for the end of the slave trade in 1808; some say he may be considering running for a third term to see this through, though Jefferson denies it
  • May 1804: Jefferson sends Lewis and Clark out to explore the new territory
  • June 15, 1804: 12th Amendment ratified
  • July 1804: Jefferson announces he will not seek a 3rd term; Vice President Burr announces he will run for the Presidency
  • September 1804: Several more expeditions into various territories are begun

Conclusion

Unshackled from a Federalist Vice President, Jefferson can finally do what he wants. His purchase of the Louisiana purchase from France massively increases the size of the United States, and he sends out what would become legendary explorers to survey the new land. He presided over the destruction of the Federalist party by his own Democratic-Republicans in the 1802 midterms. And he also saw the 12th Amendment ratified, which changed the electoral process substantially. Content with his Presidency, he let his Vice President, Aaron Burr, run in his place.

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Supreme Court, 1801-1805

Chief Justice: John Marshall (1801-)

Associate Justices

  • William Paterson (1793-)
  • William Cushing (1789-)
  • Bushrod Washington (1798-)
  • Samuel Chase (1796-)
  • John Breckinridge (1800-)

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28 minutes ago, President Garrett Walker said:

Supreme Court, 1801-1805

Chief Justice: John Marshall (1801-)

Associate Justices

  • William Paterson (1793-)
  • William Cushing (1789-)
  • Bushrod Washington (1798-)
  • Samuel Chase (1796-)
  • John Breckinridge (1800-)

But John Breckinridge wasn't born until the 1830's...

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Elections of 1804

President

President Jefferson did not break with tradition, and did not run for a third term. Instead, his power-hungry Vice President, Aaron Burr, decided that he wanted the Presidency for himself. Meanwhile, John Jay took complete control of the Federalist party and evicted every party member who was seen as a threat to his own Presidential ambitions. He would not stop at anything to get what he wanted, but democracy has its limits...

This election being the first impacted by the 12th Amendment, the Electoral College voted for a ticket as a whole, rather than for a President and then a Vice President. The Federalist ticket was John Jay and Alexander Hamilton, the same as it was four years before. They went against the Democratic-Republican ticket of Aaron Burr and Elbridge Gerry. Jay, a weak candidate who nevertheless had total control over the Federalist party, found himself going head-to-head with another weak candidate for the first time. He took advantage of this and traveled across the nation giving speeches on issues that mattered to people, and attempted to paint Burr as a dangerous demagogue. Burr returned the favor, calling Jay weak and two-faced.

The election ended up being a landslide for Burr but was in actuality quite close. Jay came very close to winning his home state of New York, NH, RI, PA, NC, and SC; if he had held every state he won and then won each of these, he would have been the 3rd President of the United States. But no, he narrowly lost each of these states and only narrowly won Maryland. Burr would get to be President – for now. Jay’s running mate, Hamilton, also wanted the Presidency one day and is furious at Burr for depriving him of a plausible pathway to that office. He challenged the President-Elect to a duel, knowing Burr’s ego would not allow him to decline. He accepted, and the date was set for March 11th in Weehawken, New Jersey.

1804.PNG.673a9ba090ea7d1ee7e58d4003731f0a.PNG

Popular vote:

Burr/Gerry: 87,821, 60.5%

Jay/Hamilton: 57,415, 39.5%

(Played as: Jay)

Congress

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 114 (up 11)

Federalists: 28 (down 11)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 27 (up 5)

Federalists: 7 (down 2)

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YE OLDE NEWSPAPER

March 11, 1805

PRESIDENT BURR KILLED BY SECRETARY HAMILTON IN DUEL

Today, former Secretary of Treasury and Vice-Presidential nominee for the Federalist party in 1800 and 1804 Alexander Hamilton shot President Burr in a duel in Weehawken, New Jersey. The President was killed instantly as the bullet was a direct hit to the heart. Vice President Gerry will assume the duties of the Presidency immediately, though whether or not he is the President is up in the air.

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Burr/Gerry Cabinet, 1805-1809

President: Aaron Burr (March 4, 1805 - March 11, 1805)

  • Elbridge Gerry takes office on March 11, 1805 following Burr's death

Vice President: Elbridge Gerry (March 4, 1805 – March 11, 1805)

  • Office vacant until March 4, 1809

 

Secretary of State: James Monroe

Secretary of Treasury: Albert Gallatin

Secretary of War: Henry Dearborn

Attorney General: Caesar A. Rodney

Secretary of the Navy: Robert Smith

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Burr/Gerry Term, 1805-1809

  • Entire term: US remains neutral in the Napoleonic Wars
  • March 4, 1805: Aaron Burr and Elbridge Gerry inaugurated
  • March 11, 1805: Former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton cheats and kills President Burr in a duel, Elbridge Gerry assumes duties of the President
  • March 1805: Elbridge Gerry insists that he has become the 4th President of the United States rather than just “Acting President.” Most agree with him, and this is confirmed much, much later, though the Constitution is not definitive either way. He is commonly derided as “His Accidency.” Meanwhile, Alexander Hamilton is arrested for murder and found guilty
  • April 23, 1805: Alexander Hamilton is hanged for murdering President Burr
  • October 1805: President Gerry starts to re-implement toned-down versions of some, but not all, aspects of Hamilton’s economic system, to the chagrin of the Treasury Secretary
  • May 1806: President Gerry calls on Congress to pass legislation to limit the federal government’s powers. This goes nowhere whatsoever
  • September 1806: Lewis and Clark report back with their findings from their exploration of the Louisiana Territory
  • September 9, 1806: William Paterson dies, Henry Brockholst Livingston given a recess appointment

Midterms

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 116 (up 2)

Federalists: 26 (down 2)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 28 (up 1)

Federalists: 6 (down 1)

  • December 14, 1806: Justice Breckinridge dies, William Johnson nominated to take his place
  • December 17, 1806: Henry Brockholst Livingston formally confirmed
  • January 19, 1807: William Johnson confirmed
  • February-March 1807: Congress creates a new Supreme Court seat, President Gerry nominates Thomas Todd to that seat and he is confirmed
  • June 1807: President Gerry comes out in favor of universal white male suffrage but does little to actually attempt to reach that point
  • December 22, 1807: President Gerry vetoes the Embargo Act of 1807, stating that it will help nothing and only encourage smuggling
  • January 1808: President Gerry signs legislation to end the slave trade, in accordance with former President Jefferson’s wishes

Conclusion

President Burr dies quickly (probably for the best, to be honest) and President Gerry assumes the office. His term is pretty uneventful and moderate, but he is popular-ish. He is desperate for a full term of his own and the legitimacy it would bring.

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Supreme Court, 1805-1809

Chief Justice: John Marshall (1801-)

Associate Justices

  • William Paterson (1793-1806)
    • replaced with Henry Brockholst Livingston (1806-)
  • William Cushing (1789-)
  • Bushrod Washington (1798-)
  • Samuel Chase (1796-)
  • John Breckinridge (1800-1806)
    • replaced by William Johnson (1807-)
  • Thomas Todd (1807-)
    • new seat created

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Elections of 1808

President

Elbridge Gerry was thrust into a bit of an interesting scenario, seeing as he was Vice President for only a week before President Burr was shot and killed. He was often referred to has "His Accidency" due to this; he was an accidental President. He did maintain that he was indeed President rather than just Acting President; most people kind of just went along with that.

Gerry set out to win an election of his own so as to gain legitimacy in the eyes of the American people. Thankfully for him, his opponent is John Jay. Jay has basically taken over the Federalist party, forcing them to nominate him in every election. Jay has had his heart set on the Presidency since the Presidency was established, and he won't stop until it's his (or he dies).

Gerry runs with his Secretary of State James Monroe, while Jay runs with C. C. Pinckney. Gerry wins in a landslide.

1808.PNG.7e064320babf48a94206948165dc97de.PNG

Popular vote:

Gerry/Monroe: 58.1%

Jay/Pinckney: 41.9%

(played as: Jay)

Congress

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 114 (down 2)

Federalists: 28 (up 2)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 27 (down 1)

Federalists: 7 (up 1)

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Gerry Cabinet, 1809-1813

President: Elbridge Gerry

Vice President: James Monroe

Secretary of State: James Madison

Secretary of Treasury: Albert Gallatin

Secretary of War: William Eustis

Attorney General: Richard Rush

Secretary of the Navy: Paul Hamilton

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Gerry Term, 1809-1813

  • March 4, 1809: Gerry and Monroe inaugurated
  • June 1809: President Gerry restates his commitment to his first term's achievements, hailing his landslide in 1808 as a sign that the voters want more of his fiscal policy which is sort of like a halfway point between Jefferson and Hamilton
  • 1810: West Florida is liberated by rebels, then annexed by the United States
  • March 1810: President Gerry starts asking for more appropriations in preparation for possible war with Britain. Congress complies, and the Northeast throws its militias together in support of any plan the Gerry Administration puts together (the Embargo Act of 1807 was vetoed so the Northeast does not hate Gerry the way they hated Madison IRL)
  • September 13, 1810: William Cushing dies, John Quincy Adams is later nominated to replace him
  • October 1810: Militias rally to the flag and invade Canada. Britain, a bit tied up at the moment with the whole "Napoleonic Wars" thing, is shocked

Midterms

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 117 (up 3)

Federalists: 25 (down 3)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 30 (up 3)

Federalists: 4 (down 3)

  • December 1810: Secretary of State Madison meets with the British Foreign Minister and demands an end to impressment and any future invasion plans in exchange for Canada
  • 1811: First National Bank is rechartered after President Gerry strongarms Vice President Monroe into breaking the Senate tie in favor of rechartering
  • February 1811: Talks between the Americans and the British are ongoing and intense
  • May 8, 1811: Secretary Madison and the British Foreign Minister reach an agreement; Canada will be returned, impressment will stop, and the British will not invade the United States. President Gerry hails this as America becoming a truly legitimate nation on the international scale, and calls it "a major victory over our former masters"
  • June 19, 1811: Samuel Chase dies, Gabriel Duvall is later nominated to replace him
  • November 18, 1811: John Quincy Adams and Gabriel Duvall confirmed
  • March 1812: President Gerry, extremely popular due to his diplomatic victory over the British (averting the war of 1812), nevertheless declines to run for another term, stating that he served almost 2 terms and did not want to be perceived as power hungry or breaking tradition needlessly. His Vice President, James Monroe, will run, however
  • April 30, 1812: Louisiana joins the Union

Conclusion

Unexpectedly, President Gerry becomes great during his first term, and will frequently make the top 10 best Presidents of all time in future historical rankings. He averts a major war while reaching a diplomatic end to any hostilities, plus conquest like that of Canada plays well with voters. He could easily run for and win another term but he does not.

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Supreme Court, 1809-1813

Chief Justice: John Marshall (1801-)

Associate Justices

  • Henry Brockholst Livingston (1806-)
  • William Cushing (1789-1810)
    • replaced with John Quincy Adams
  • Bushrod Washington (1798-)
  • Samuel Chase (1796-1811)
    • replaced with Gabriel Duvall
  • William Johnson (1807-)
  • Thomas Todd (1807-)

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Elections of 1812

President

Extremely popular President Gerry did not pursue a third term, so his Vice President, James Monroe, took up the Democratic-Republican helm. House Speaker Henry Clay was chosen as his running mate.

John Jay had a total and complete lock on the Federalist party's Presidential nominating process, and because there was no viable option other than him, he was the nominee. Rufus King was the Vice Presidential nominee.

Interestingly, DeWitt Clinton decided to run, taking advantage of a Federalist Party demolished by John Jay. He hoped to be the real opposition in 1812, which mostly worked.

Jay and Clinton focused on the northeast and on Pennsylvania. Problem was, they ended up splitting the vote in several states and handed Vermont and New Hampshire to Monroe because of it. In the end, there was no way Monroe was going to lose. He won in a landslide.

1812.PNG.19946d75f69bf6dd24b98619854cb2ca.PNG

Popular vote:

Monroe/Clay: 268,547, 47.8%

Clinton/Ingersoll: 179,147, 31.9%

Jay/King: 114,475, 20.4%

(played as: Monroe)

Congress:

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 142 (up 25)

Federalists: 40 (up 15)

Senate: 

Democratic-Republicans: 32 (up 2)

Federalists: 4 (no change)

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Monroe Cabinet, 1813-1817

President: James Monroe

Vice President: Henry Clay

Secretary of State: Richard Rush

Secretary of Treasury: William Crawford

Secretary of War: William Henry Harrison

Attorney General: William Wirt

Secretary of the Navy: Benjamin Crowninshield

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Monroe Term, 1813-1817

  • March 4, 1813: Monroe and Clay inaugurated
  • March 1813: Monroe picks Cabinet secretaries, choses mostly based on qualifications rather than party
  • September 1813: Monroe proposes a major internal improvements plan, which would dump a relatively enormous amount of money (which America now kind-of has because we didn't screw up with the Embargo Act and a war) into building new roads, canals, bridges, and more, to Congress
  • September 1813-February 1814: The Internal Improvements Act is fleshed out in Congress
  • March 7, 1814: The Internal Improvements Act passes and is signed into law
  • March 1814-the rest of the term: American infrastructure is improved and expanded substantially

Midterms

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 147 (up 5)

Federalists: 36 (down 4)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 33 (up 1)

Federalists: 3 (down 1)

  • January 1814: American economy is steadily growing
  • October 1814: Term "Era of Good Feelings" is coined, deemed to have begun with the election of President Monroe in 1812
  • April 1815: The economic growth begins to slow down a little, though the internal improvements keep unemployment low
  • December 1815: President Monroe states that he will be running for reelection, which at this point basically means that he will be elected as he is very popular, the Federalists are on the brink of total collapse, and DeWitt Clinton's main platform plank (internal improvements) mean that he will not stand a chance against the President in 1816
  • May 1816: DeWitt Clinton endorses President Monroe and says that he will not be a candidate in 1816
  • December 11, 1816: Indiana joins the Union[, insert Mike Pence joke here]

Conclusion

Monroe's first term is horribly uneventful except for the internal improvements. The Era of Good Feelings begins four years early. The Federalists may be on the verge of being relegated to history textbooks; they have never won the Presidency (and sure as hell won't in 1816), have inexplicably tied themselves to John Jay in Presidential elections, and have lost any real influence in Congress.

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Supreme Court, 1813-1817

Chief Justice: John Marshall (1801-)

Associate Justices

  • Henry Brockholst Livingston (1806-)
  • John Quincy Adams (1811-)
  • Bushrod Washington (1798-)
  • Gabriel Duvall (1812-)
  • William Johnson (1807-)
  • Thomas Todd (1807-)

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Elections of 1816

President

President Monroe is basically a shoo-in for reelection. He keeps Clay as his VP, since they get along quite well, while the Federalists take the Jay/King ticket from 1812 and insert it into 1816. It's not successful, and the entire election is rather uneventful.

1816.PNG.7d1b06e961ed697ead2ffd0c2c1e39a6.PNG

Popular vote:

Monroe/Clay: 80,560, 61.3%

Jay/King: 43,254, 32.9%

Clinton/Ingersoll (write in, they didn't actually run): 7,686, 5.8%

(Played as: Jay)

Congress

House:

Democratic-Republicans: 148 (up 1)

Federalists: 37 (up 1)

Senate:

Democratic-Republicans: 33 (no change)

Federalists: 3 (no change)

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Monroe Cabinet, 1817-1821

President: James Monroe

Vice President: Henry Clay

Secretary of State: Richard Rush

Secretary of Treasury: William Crawford

Secretary of War: Andrew Jackson

Attorney General: William Wirt

Secretary of the Navy: Smith Thompson

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So I've realized that this has basically been mostly the same as IRL except with Gerry averting the War of 1812. We're about to go into a long stretch of time where I realized it was just going to be basically IRL with a few changes (Clay wins in 1820 and basically does the same stuff as Monroe did IRL) so instead of painstakingly laying everything out, I'm going to summarize everything from 1816 to the next interesting thing, which is the election of 1836. That'll be interesting, and I have plans for the 1860's and, spoiler alert, things will get crazy in the 1910's and 1920's which should be interesting to you guys, more interesting than a play-by-play of things you can read off Wikipedia.

TL;DR: I have plans for this thread that do not include 1816-1836, therefore I will skip past them

Monroe's Second Term

More or less the same as IRL with the Panic of 1819, Missouri Compromise, etc.

1820 Election

Federalists collapse, with Jay being the nominee one last time before dying. Clay is the nominee for President, while John Quincy Adams resigns from the Supreme Court (is replaced by Henry Thompson) and is Clay's VP. One MD elector votes for Jay so Clay doesn't win unanimously (an honor which solely belongs to President Washington).

1820.PNG.95a986989cf572093a67175d0fd01ccc.PNG

Popular vote:

Clay/Adams: 162,794, 71.6%

Jay/King: 64,462, 28.4%

(Played as: Jay)

Clay's First Term

Clay governs as Monroe did IRL, basically everything happens as it actually did. He runs for reelection in 1824, which is interesting because the Federalists no longer exist.

1824 Election

President Clay and Vice President Adams run against populist former War Secretary Andrew Jackson, and former Treasury Secretary William Crawford. Clay narrowly wins, and Clay's ensuing distaste for the common man and his voting rights may come back to haunt him, and Jackson seems poised to run again in '28

1824.PNG.0f7b4018b64a9b1f5d21e41a66eaf594.PNG

Popular vote:

Clay/Adams: 154,566, 49.8%

Jackson/Calhoun: 96,309, 31%

Crawford/Macon: 59,805, 19.2%

(Played as: Clay)

Clay's Second Term

Basically JQA's term. He decides to run for a third term, which is a big no-no.

1828 Election

Clay and Adams run for a third term, which upsets the masses (of white men), who have recently gained more enfranchisement. Jackson runs again and calls Clay elitist, which is not untrue. Meanwhile the Democratic-Republican party has split into the Democrats, which Jackson is running under, and the National Republicans, which Clay is running under. Jackson crushes Clay.

Capture.PNG.48d83e1bc56597bc06c1d225b30e997a.PNG

Popular vote:

Jackson/Calhoun: 767,046, 64%

Clay/Adams: 432,256, 36%

(Played as: Clay)

Jackson's first term

The same as IRL, except isn't as terrible for the banking system since it's proven to be good and is not controversial like it was IRL.

1832 Election

President Jackson goes against former Vice President and Supreme Court Associate Justice John Quincy Adams (running with former War Secretary William Henry Harrison) plus a few other candidates. The race is initially a blowout for Jackson, but then narrows, only for Adams' campaign to collapse in the final month before the election.

Capture.PNG.8ee8946bfd582177d19c2e0cd814b11f.PNG

Popular vote:

Jackson/Van Buren: 899,580, 61.4%

Adams/Harrison: 399,519, 27.3%

Wirt/Ellmaker: 111,442, 7.6%

Floyd/Lee: 54,722, 3.7%

(Played as: Adams)

Jackson's Second Term

Same as IRL except the Panic of 1837 happens in 1836 instead, damaging the Democrats in the election of 1836. He might run for a third term but might not, as public opinion is starting to shift away from him a little bit.

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Elections of 1836

President

President Jackson's popularity was waning by the middle of the 1830's, so he declined to run for a third term. Instead, his Vice President, Martin Van Buren, decided he would like to run for the office himself. He was easily nominated by the party he helped create, though by this time a relatively new invention had usurped the old nominating process: the Presidential Nominating Convention.

The National Republicans quickly went up in flames, and by 1836 they had gone the way of the Federalists. In their place, a new party, the Whigs, sprang up in opposition to the Democratic party. They nominated General and former War Secretary William Henry Harrison for President and Rep. Francis Granger for Vice President.

The general election was fierce and extremely close the entire time. Harrison knew he had to win Martin Van Buren's home state of New York if he had any hope of winning the Presidency, so he focused most of his time there and in Pennsylvania, which he also had to win (he offered James Buchanan, a Democratic Senator from Pennsylvania, the position of Secretary of State if he endorsed him, which helped deliver the state decisively). The week before the election, word has it that the entire thing was a tossup and that no one could predict who would win.

The thing was, Van Buren led in the popular vote the entire time, and by double digits, no less.

Harrison waited anxiously for the Electoral College's decision to be finalized and announced. Van Buren was confident he had the election in the bag, but it turns out he lost in one of the narrowest elections (by Electoral College margins) in American history. It later came out that the outgoing Vice President had lost his home state by a measly 0.8%.

Capture.PNG.baff8c8003115a95b0b573256d520d5a.PNG

Popular Vote:

Harrison/Granger: 628,144, 41.3% (won Electoral College)

Van Buren/Johnson: 893,253, 58.7% (lost Electoral College)

(Played as: Harrison, I thought I'd lose because NY, PA, CT, NJ, and DE were all tossups 6 days before the election, and MI, PA, and IL were closer than they had been at any point previously)

Congress

House:

Democrats: 128 (down 15)

Whigs: 100 (up 25)

Anti-Masons: 7 (down 9)

Nullifiers: 6 (down 2)

Senate:

Democrats: 34 (up 3)

Whigs: 17 (down 2)

Nullifiers: 1 (down 1)

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