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I'm gonna create another "every election" playthrough except Alexander Hamilton is the first President of the United States. There are also some other things further down the line I didn't get to do in my "rewriting American history" playthrough so hopefully this'll let me do them.

List of Presidents of the United States and their Vice Presidents:

black = Federalist, green = Democratic-Republican, dark red = National Republican, blue = Democrat, yellow = Whig, red = Republican (GOP), purple = Liberal Republican

  1. Alexander Hamilton/John Adams (1789-1805)
    • Adams replaced with Aaron Burr in the election of 1800
  2. Aaron Burr/Thomas Jefferson (1805-1809)
  3. Alexander Hamilton/John Adams (1809-October 4th, 1810)a
  4. John Adams/[vacant office] (October 4th, 1810-1813)
  5. James Monroe/James Madison (1813-1825)
  6. Andrew Jackson/John Quincy Adams (1825-1829)
  7. William Henry Harrison/Richard Rush (1829-1833)
  8. Martin Van Buren/William Wilkins (1833-1837)
  9. John Quincy Adams/Francis Granger (1837-1845)
    • Granger replaced with John Tyler in the election of 1840
  10. Henry Clay/Theodore Frelinghuysen (1845-1849)
  11. James K. Polk/James Buchanan (1849-1853)
  12. James Buchanan/Franklin Pierce (1853-1861)
  13. Abraham Lincoln/Benjamin Wade (1861-1869)
  14. Benjamin Wade/James G. Blaine (1869-May 6th, 1871)a
  15. James G. Blaine/[vacant] (May 6th, 1871-1873)
  16. Benjamin Gratz Brown/Frederick Douglass (1873-1877)
    • Horace Greeley was elected in 1872, but died before taking office; Vice-President-elect Brown became President-elect
  17. Samuel Tilden/Winfield Scott Hancock (1877-1881)
  18. James A. Garfield/Rutherford B. Hayes (1881-August 22nd, 1883)a
  19. Rutherford B. Hayes/[vacant] (August 22nd, 1883-1889)
    • vacancy filled by Benjamin Harrison in the election of 1884
  20. Grover Cleveland/John Quincy Adams II (1889-1897)
    • Adams II replaced with Adlai Stevenson I in the election of 1892
  21. William Jennings Bryan/Arthur Sewall (1897-1901)
  22. William McKinley/Theodore Roosevelt (March 4th, 1901-March 14th, 1901)a
  23. Theodore Roosevelt/Robert M. La Follette, Jr. (March 14th, 1901-1909)
    • La Follette confirmed on March 17th, 1901
  24. Robert M. La Follette, Jr./Charles Evans Hughes (1909-1913)
  25. Woodrow Wilson/Thomas R. Marshall (1913-1917)
  26. T. Coleman du Pont/Henry Ford (1917-January 18th, 1918)a
  27. Henry Ford/Herbert Hoover (January 18th, 1918-October 24th, 1923)r
    • Hoover confirmed on January 27th
  28. Herbert Hoover/[vacant] (October 24th, 1923-1933)
    • vacancy filled by Calvin Coolidge in the election of 1924
  29. Franklin D. Roosevelt/John Nance Garner (1933-1941)
  30. Cordell Hull/Millard Tydings (1941-1949)
    • Tydings replaced with Henry Wallace in the election of 1944
  31. Thomas E. Dewey/Earl Warren (1949-1953)
  32. Hubert H. Humphrey/John F. Kennedy (1953-1957)
  33. Richard M. Nixon/Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (1957-1961)
  34. John F. Kennedy/Lyndon B. Johnson (1961-November 22nd, 1966)d
    • Johnson replaced with Robert F. Kennedy in the election of 1964
  35. Robert F. Kennedy/Edward M. Kennedy (November 22nd, 1966-June 6th, 1968)a
    • Edward Kennedy confirmed on November 25th
  36. Edward M. Kennedy/[vacant] (June 6th, 1968-January 20th, 1969)
  37. George Romney/Ronald Reagan (1969-1977)
  38. Ronald Reagan/Bob Dole (1977-1985)
  39. Bob Dole/Elizabeth Dole (1985-1989)
  40. Joe Biden/Al Gore (1989-1997)
  41. Al Gore/Mario Cuomo (1997-2001)
  42. Elizabeth Dole/Donald Trump (2001-2005)
  43. John Edwards/Hillary Clinton (2005-January 25th, 2010)r
  44. Hillary Clinton/Mark Warner (January 25th, 2010-January 20th, 2013)
    • Warner confirmed on January 27th
  45. Donald Trump/Kelly Ayotte (2013-2017)
  46. Barack Obama/Elizabeth Warren (2017-2025)

a: Assassinated

r: Resigned

d: Died in office

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Constitutional Convention

Nothing changes here EXCEPT Alexander Hamilton pushes for the Presidential minimum age to be 30 rather than 35. This change is accepted and the Constitution is ratified and goes into effect as it does in real life.

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GEORGE WASHINGTON DIES OF HEART ATTACK

General George Washington died this morning, September 8th, 1788, in his home. It has been determined that he died of a heart attack. He was considered a shoo-in for the Presidency; now, it seems that it will be a battle between Alexander Hamilton and John Adams, with the other becoming Vice President.

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Alexander Hamilton Elected 1st President of the United States in 1789

Alexander Hamilton has been elected the first ever President of the United States, and John Adams will be his Vice President.

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Hamilton's First Term

President Hamilton mostly used his first term to get the fledgling nation's economic situation under control. He oversaw the permanent establishment of the National Bank of the United States (not just a 20 year charter but one that is actually established), the assumption of state debt by the federal government, and the implementation of a system of tariffs.

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President Hamilton, Vice President Adams Reelected

President Hamilton and Vice President Adams were easily reelected by the Electoral College in 1792.

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Hamilton's Second Term

While continuing the economic policy of his first term, President Hamilton attempted to push Congress to draft an amendment to the Constitution that would create a more centralized government and a more streamlined electoral system, though he was not initially successful. Hamilton also pushed for the abolition of slavery, though this did not go anywhere during this term. President Hamilton is growing more and more frustrated by the limitations of his office.

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12th Amendment Ratified

President Hamilton has been pushing for a government and electoral reform amendment for most of his second term; Congress compromised and gave him just the electoral reform bit. Presidential candidates will now get to choose their running mates, and the Electoral College will now select a ticket as a whole rather than a candidate for each office. The 12th Amendment passed both houses and was ratified on July 10th, 1795.

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Hamilton Elected to Third Term Unanimously

President Hamilton and Vice President Adams have been reelected again unanimously. 1796 was the first election that was affected by the 12th amendment.

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10 minutes ago, Bruce Fischer said:

Hamilton Elected to Third Term Unanimously

President Hamilton and Vice President Adams have been reelected again unanimously. 1796 was the first election that was affected by the 12th amendment.

Capture.PNG

Was that a Mugabe or Putin election, or was that an honest vote?

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Just now, Patine said:

Was that a Mugabe or Putin election, or was that an honest vote?

This one was honest, people quite like Hamilton in 1796, but by the end of his third term sentiment won't be quite so unanimous.

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2 minutes ago, Bruce Fischer said:

This one was honest, people quite like Hamilton in 1796, but by the end of his third term sentiment won't be quite so unanimous.

Well, Mugabe's first win in Zimbabwe in 1980 against White Minority (Supremacist) Rhodesian Front leader Ian Smith was a legitimate landslide, too... :P 

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Just now, Patine said:

Well, Mugabe's first win in Zimbabwe in 1980 against White Minority (Supremacist) Rhodesian Front leader Ian Smith was a legitimate landslide, too... :P 

Note that I said "this one was honest," no guarantees that future ones will be :P

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Hamilton's Third Term

President Hamilton focused his third term on international relations after failing to get government reform through Congress (and mostly just continuing his economic policy). The Quasi-War with France resulted in a US victory, resulting in the Convention of 1800, was a major victory for the Hamilton Administration. Hamilton again tried to end slavery, but Congress again pushed back.

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Electoral College Deadlocks, House Chooses Alexander Hamilton as President and Senate Chooses Aaron Burr as Vice President in 1800

President Hamilton was pretty popular throughout his third term, though some of the people were beginning to tire of him. Hamilton/Adams was challenged by a ticket of Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, along with a ticket of John Jay and Charles C. Pinckney. Jay was surprisingly popular, but none of the candidates got close to a majority of the Electoral College votes necessary to become President. The election was decided by the House, who chose Alexander Hamilton to serve a fourth term, though the Senate chose Aaron Burr as his Vice President, much to Hamilton and Burr's mutual chagrin.

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Hamilton's Fourth Term

President Hamilton had the Congress (which the Federalists lost control of in 1802) pass libel laws, which were unpopular. The general sentiment of the nation is that Hamilton is trying to become a king, and they're obviously extremely averse to that, especially since he lost the popular vote (and electoral vote) by a lot in 1800. Anyway, when offered Louisiana by France, President Hamilton eagerly bought it. President Hamilton and Vice President Burr hated each other so very much that Burr even said "if we weren't serving together, I would duel him!"

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Hamilton Denied Fifth Term, Burr Elected by Convincing Margin in 1804

President Hamilton decided he wanted to run for re-re-re-reelection, and dumped Vice President Burr from the ticket for obvious reasons, replacing him with Charles C. Pinckney. Vice President Burr decided he'd attempt to boot Hamilton out of office himself, choosing former Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson as his running mate. Burr was successful after painting Hamilton as an elitist who was on the verge of becoming a king.

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Burr's First Term

President Burr, while elected by a wide margin, was not at all liked by the American people once they discovered that he was power hungry, has insatiable empleomania, and flip-flops on all kinds of issues. He also signs the Embargo Act of 1807, which hurts the economy and is extremely unpopular. Burr also tries to tighten libel laws, but meets resistance in both chambers of Congress (by his own party) and his Vice President, Thomas Jefferson.

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Hamilton Wins Fifth Term in 1808

President Burr is very unpopular, and while former President Hamilton is also not seen favorably by most Americans, he jumps in the race with John Adams as his running mate, then beats Burr in a fairly close electoral college result.

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President Hamilton Assassinated!

President Hamilton was visiting New York City on October 4th, 1809, when a disgruntled Burr voter shot him on the street (the man was later executed for this). A Constitutional crisis regarding whether the Vice President assumes the office or simply the duties of the Presidency ensues, but it is later worked out that the VP (John Adams in this case) fully assumes the office and duties of President.

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Fifth Hamilton Term/First Adams Term

President Hamilton pushed even harder for the abolition of slavery, and got Congress to pass a law making it illegal in any new states or territories, but could not get a total ban (if he had the Civil War probably would've started then and there). The South got agitated, but did not secede. Tensions with Europe were increasing, but then President Hamilton died and President Adams takes office.

Using diplomacy, Adams was able to stave off war with Britain at least until the next President takes office, as Adams will not run for his own term. Adams mostly maintained his fallen predecessor's policies.

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James Monroe Wins in 1812

Aaron Burr's Secretary of State, James Monroe, has been elected President of the United States, and his running mate James Madison as Vice President. They defeated DeWitt Clinton and Rufus King. The unpopularity of Presidents Hamilton and Adams has seriously damaged the Federalist party.Capture.PNG

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First Monroe Term

Shortly after his inauguration, Britain invaded the US. President Monroe is prepared, however, and quickly repels the British, winning the War of 1812 in a little over a year. Monroe then pushed for more infrastructure improvements, and made tours across the US to meet with citizens.

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