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vcczar

1992 Election: Poll

This elections follows the collapse of the Soviet Union, Desert Storm, and takes place during an economic downturn. The early stages of globalization are beginning.   

24 members have voted

  1. 1. Which candidate do you support in the 1992 election?

    • George Bush - TX - Republican (low tax, okay with multiculturalism, anti-abortion, pro-business, aggressive foreign policy, education reform, deregulation, globalization)
    • Pat Buchanan - VA - Conservative Republican (cater to Religious Rights, restrict immigration, low taxes, oppose multiculturalism, anti-abortion, anti-gay rights, America first)
    • Bill Clinton - AR - Moderate Democrat (low taxes, fiscal restraint, balance labor with business, okay with multiculturalism, okay with globalization, marital affairs, Healthcare, Civil Rights and Equal Rights, welfare reform, major focus on economic policies to help poor families)
    • Jerry Brown - CA - Progressive Democrat (flat tax, abolish dept of education, term limits for congress, pro-labor, living wage, oppose globalization, reform government, Civil Rights and Equal Rights)
    • Paul Tsongas - MA - Democrat (fiscal restraint, low tax, fiscally centrist, very socially liberal)
    • Ross Perot - TX - Independent (strongly opposes globalization, wants a balanced budget, opposes gun control, election reform)
  2. 2. Bush has been criticized for caring more about foreign policy than domestic policy. As a member of Congress, how do you respond to questions about this?

    • I think the president's primary job is foreign policy and foreign trade. The state governments and our Congress are supposed to focus on domestic matters.
    • I think Bush lacks interest in the economy, and he's focusing purely on what interests him. Sometimes a president has to focus in the areas that he might not enjoy at all. Domestically, we need a president that is interested in our lives, not in fields in the Middle East.
    • I don't know/I don't care. I think he cares about domestic policy just as much as foreign policy.
  3. 3. As a member of Congress, how do you feel about globalization?

    • I think it will benefit the country. By outsourcing jobs overseas, businesses can raise higher profits, we can better influence the world, and provide better jobs for people in other countries. It's sound business and sound foreign policy.
    • I oppose globalization during times of economic slowdown. We need jobs in America while people are struggling. Allow jobs overseas, only when the economy is very strong and unemployment isn't a problem.
    • Leave the jobs for Americans! We want American made products by American workers. Globalization will just make the rich richer, and benefit other countries more than our workers, who need jobs.
    • I don't know/I don't care.
      0


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Here's 1992. 10 votes and I go to 1996. Past polls are in the forum.

This is the first election that I kind of kept of with. I remember watching SNL and the news as a kid. My dad voted for Clinton, even though my dad was conservative. He liked Perot, too. 

The first election I remembered was 1988. I was in 3rd grade. Me and one other person were the only people in the class that "voted" for Dukakis. The teacher had us place stickers on the candidate we wanted. I voted for Dukakis in the class, because no one wanted to--I didn't have any political ideology at the time. 

Also, I've started the semester, so the rest of these might not be as detailed as the previous polls, since I'll be spending about 10 minutes on them instead of 15 to 30 minutes. Also, I may only post one poll every day or two. I'll try to keep up with the 10 votes though. 

@vcczar

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This was a hard one for me. I picked Brown, but he was kind of all over the place in this election.

As far as globalization goes, this is kind of a two-edged sword. I don't believe in the American first mentality. Personally, I think nationalism, patriotism, borders, etc. are currently necessary, but ultimately cause more problems than not. As such, I think businesses and people should aim to do what is best for the entire world, rather than selfishly help only their own people. Although, I don't fault them for doing this. It's preferable to help all of humanity. In this sense, I support globalization, since the jobs are often a step up from whatever job the foreign workers had before. What I don't like, is when the motive is increased profit at the expense of America workers who are laid off for cheap foreign labor. Multiculturalism is fine with me. That was another big issue in this time. I would support a reformed version of NAFTA, allowing some protection for American workers that are currently employed for companies that send jobs overseas. I'd also have a measure that in times of economic downturn, businesses with be heavily penalized if they assign new jobs overseas. 

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1) Buchanan in primaries, Bush in general.

2)2

3) Amerca First! (I am now a free-trader but in the early 90's not so much. I think that in the early 90's and late 80's even starting in the mid-70's, protectionism would be beneficial, unlike today) 

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33 minutes ago, vcczar said:

This was a hard one for me. I picked Brown, but he was kind of all over the place in this election.

As far as globalization goes, this is kind of a two-edged sword. I don't believe in the American first mentality. Personally, I think nationalism, patriotism, borders, etc. are currently necessary, but ultimately cause more problems than not. As such, I think businesses and people should aim to do what is best for the entire world, rather than selfishly help only their own people. Although, I don't fault them for doing this. It's preferable to help all of humanity. In this sense, I support globalization, since the jobs are often a step up from whatever job the foreign workers had before. What I don't like, is when the motive is increased profit at the expense of America workers who are laid off for cheap foreign labor. Multiculturalism is fine with me. That was another big issue in this time. I would support a reformed version of NAFTA, allowing some protection for American workers that are currently employed for companies that send jobs overseas. I'd also have a measure that in times of economic downturn, businesses with be heavily penalized if they assign new jobs overseas.

The problem is that thinking patterns like hard nationalism and parochialism (like Trump, and many US Republicans, all of those far-right-wing reactionary, eurosceptic parties springing up in the EU countries, United Russia, the BJP in India, Likud in Israel, certainly most hard-right parties in predominantly Islamic countries, and many others besides) doesn't work anymore in the modern world in the long-term like it did even a few decades ago. The world is now FAR more politically, socially, economically, culturally, - and, of recently, digitally, - intertwined than it EVER has been before. The "butterfly effect" is far more pronounced today than it was ever previously. International mega-corporations, de facto beholden to no one nation's laws, dictate terms to whole governments, even World Powers and Superpowers. Sensationalist and over-dramatized "solutions" to border problems like building big walls are completely impractical and stupid to propose to the point that it should insult most people's intelligences (this is NOT 3rd Century BC China). Even the currently-existing nation today that empirically tries the hardest to isolate itself from the rest of the world, North Korea, "the Hermit Nation," still has many notable cracks in it's barriers.

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Good points, @Patine

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1) George Bush

2) Option 1

3) Option 2

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Assuming that everyone who voted Democratic in the primaries, would vote for Bill Clinton in the general election Republicans going to lose this forum election surprisingly badly. At least at the moment.

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@Conservative Elector 2

I'm actually quite surprised how often the forum goes for the more liberal or progressive candidate, considering that the forum is probably center-right if you pool everyone's ideologies together and average them. I've noticed that, on the whole, the forum prefers a reform, anti-corruption, candidate more than someone that may have a more similar platform. I think someone that runs as an outsider, favor civic reform, will wipe out corruption would probably have a hard time doing just that. In part, the forum is picking on favorability in these elections; although, in another forum poll about the current election, people in the forum didn't consider favorability to be the major factor in choosing a candidate. 

 

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1 hour ago, vcczar said:

@Conservative Elector 2

I'm actually quite surprised how often the forum goes for the more liberal or progressive candidate, considering that the forum is probably center-right if you pool everyone's ideologies together and average them. I've noticed that, on the whole, the forum prefers a reform, anti-corruption, candidate more than someone that may have a more similar platform. I think someone that runs as an outsider, favor civic reform, will wipe out corruption would probably have a hard time doing just that. In part, the forum is picking on favorability in these elections; although, in another forum poll about the current election, people in the forum didn't consider favorability to be the major factor in choosing a candidate. 

 

I guess through this whole process you can see I am truly center-left,even though I'm supporting Trump. And I agree.

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1. Pat Buchana. Ross Perot in the general election.

2. Option # 1

3. Option #3

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@TheMiddlePolitical

Yeah it is an odd anomaly. You have a La Follette icon (Far-Left to Left), you say you're (Center-left), your name is the middle politician (center), you're voting Trump who is (center-right to far-right depending on the day of the week). I think your name used to be the Libertarian if I remember correctly. I'm sure you have your reasons voting for Trump, but all signs point to you supporting Clinton, Stein or possibly Johnson over Trump. If you like La Follette progressivism, then you'd probably like Clinton's platform, which is considered the most progressive platform in Democratic history--since it's half-Bernie Sanders.  The only appeal to Trump for me is entertainment value. I think he's too unpredictable to vote for him on his platform. I don't think he can make much change unless he aligns himself with one of the major parties more completely. So he'll probably be ineffective domestically. I think Clinton will operate center-left to center the first years of her presidency until both houses are won (if that happens). Then she'll try to make Sanders voters happy. She'll throw out a few token progressive proposals that will be blocked by Congress until then. However, she'll get some compromised things through. Obviously, the other parties can't win. 

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44 minutes ago, vcczar said:

@TheMiddlePolitical

Yeah it is an odd anomaly. You have a La Follette icon (Far-Left to Left), you say you're (Center-left), your name is the middle politician (center), you're voting Trump who is (center-right to far-right depending on the day of the week). I think your name used to be the Libertarian if I remember correctly. I'm sure you have your reasons voting for Trump, but all signs point to you supporting Clinton, Stein or possibly Johnson over Trump. If you like La Follette progressivism, then you'd probably like Clinton's platform, which is considered the most progressive platform in Democratic history--since it's half-Bernie Sanders.  The only appeal to Trump for me is entertainment value. I think he's too unpredictable to vote for him on his platform. I don't think he can make much change unless he aligns himself with one of the major parties more completely. So he'll probably be ineffective domestically. I think Clinton will operate center-left to center the first years of her presidency until both houses are won (if that happens). Then she'll try to make Sanders voters happy. She'll throw out a few token progressive proposals that will be blocked by Congress until then. However, she'll get some compromised things through. Obviously, the other parties can't win. 

Ahaha I know a bit confusing my centrist views come from Australian centrist platform (as most know I am Australian,but am going to university in the US) I guess I could be considered Far left besides my views on abortion (not for religious reasons) and gun control,and refugee crisis,I'm far-left across the bored (immigration though I'm for just amnesty not tottaly open borders)

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-Bill Clinton

-That is his job!

-No!More jobs for Americans!

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