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gopprogressive

Canada Election 2015 for 2008 engine

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Hey all,

So I wanted to express inerest in making a Canada 2015 election scenario for the 2008 engine. What are the issues for the official 2015 scenario?

I'd suggest these based on what I've read- but please feel free to correct me on anything.

Leadership 2

Integrity 2

Experience 2

Issue Familiarity 1

Aboriginal Affairs 3

Business Taxes 1

Childcare 2

Crime 1

Defense 2

Democratic Reform 3

Economy 4

Energy 3

Environment 3

Gender Equality 2

Healthcare 2

Marijuana 3

Multiculturalism 2

Pensions 1

Personal Taxes 3

Quebec 1

Trade 2

Terrorism 3

And old/new/updated endorsements:

The Sun Chain

The Globe and Mail

Toronto Star

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Actually, strangely for the first time in decades, Quebec and it's "national" status doesn't seem to be a visible or real significant issue this election, especially with the BQ on it's death bed and the NPD, who control the lion's share of incumbants in Quebec (including many who've promoted separatism in the past), not making an issue of it at all really either. So, though being strange for any Canadian federal election since the '70's, I'd take the Quebec issue off the list for something else myself. However, strangely for what one would expect in Canada in the 21st Century, women's rights has come up, as the Harper Government is under attack by all opposition parties for deliberately denigrating great progress already made before he became PM in that area.

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It is going to be a very low profile issue.

I suppose Gender Equality could replace the Government issue ((which would be Stick with Harper (Tory) vs Change (Grit) vs a Centre-Left Coalition (NDP) or Left-wing Coalition government (Green, BQ)).

What should be the highest profile issues (3 and 4), middle profile (2), and lowest profile (1)?

Please note this would include Leadership, Integrity, Experience, and Issue Familiarity.

Actually, strangely for the first time in decades, Quebec and it's "national" status doesn't seem to be a visible or real significant issue this election, especially with the BQ on it's death bed and the NPD, who control the lion's share of incumbants in Quebec (including many who've promoted separatism in the past), not making an issue of it at all really either. So, though being strange for any Canadian federal election since the '70's, I'd take the Quebec issue off the list for something else myself. However, strangely for what one would expect in Canada in the 21st Century, women's rights has come up, as the Harper Government is under attack by all opposition parties for deliberately denigrating great progress already made before he became PM in that area.

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Aboriginal Affairs seems higher-profile than usual this election, with the wrangling over the Missing and Murdered Aboriginal Women's Report and Mulcair, May, and Trudeau I believe doing the first campaign stops (if only a few) on First Nations Reservations of any major party leaders in a federal election since the 1988 election in the aftermath of Aboriginal Manitoba MLA Elijah Harper (no relation to Stephen Harper) single-handedly dealing the death blow to the proposed Meech Lake Constitutional Accord. Terrorism is also quite big, but I definitely think the controversial Bill C-51 meant to combat it and it's potential for abuse, which is just as big an issue as Terrorism, should be worded prominently into the stances of that issue. Trade also, as the TPP has strongly polarized that issue just recently. Democratic Reform, the Economy, Marijuana, and Personal Taxes have also come up quite a bit, but not nearly as much as the above, though, strangely, in Democratic Reform and Personal Taxes, Harper and Trudeau are closer (mostly status quo in Democratic Reform, as Harper hasn't brought up his vaunted elected Senate policies for quite a while, especially with all the Conservative Senator scandals hanging over such an issue, and both leaders seem to lean to various tax cut schemes of different sorts), while Mulcair, May, and Duceppe are more demanding of sharp Democratic Reform and the rich paying more taxes, but on the Economy and Marijuana, Harper stands mostly alone, denouncing Marijuana as universally destructive and that only hard criminal justice can deal with the issue, and touting a reputation on economic achievement that many opponents and independents say isn't warranted, while all the opposition leaders favour relaxing Marijuana laws to legalizing it outright and say various degrees of economic reform or even restructuring are needed.

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It is true that in Quebec Duceppe said that he wanted the "balance of power" but, for the english on this forum, they will smile.

Contrary to Nick Clegg the former leader of the Liberal Democrats in UK Duceppe is a strong leader who refuses to have a coalition without serious gains for Quebec.

He made that when he had 50 seats under Harper in 2006 and 2008 untill the Orange wave of 2011.

So the nature of "coalition" for Gilles Duceppe is enough strange, he voted for the budget if he was winning in the major lines.

In contraty to the Green I totally agree, it's surely their goal to have the balance of power, but just to do a coalition with Trudeau or in a worst possibility, Mulcair.

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I'm going to redo the 2004 and 2006 elections first, like I did with 2008 and 2011 (both of which turned out really well).

Issues in 2004:

Abortion

Business Tax

Corruption

Debt Reduction

Defense

Environment

Families

Gun Registry

Immigration

Marijuana

National Security

Personal Tax

Provincial Powers

Public Health Care

Quebec

Same-Sex Marriage

Trade

US Relations

Let me know what you think.

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