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vcczar

1892 Election

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1892 is up. The map was made by JViking.

Updates will come eventually.

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If I may ask, how do you intend to manage the VERY early (First Party System, essentially) elections, if at all, that are a bit difficult by the current engine, as they had no party conventions (but at times competition for party nominations), and the split in state EV's (faithless electors) was much more common, and different electors often voted for different combinations of running mates to the point that a winner for President and VP often had different numbers of EV's to them each?

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To answer your questions incompletely, I'll probably have to be creative. Such as seeing what happens when I do an election from the primaries, but then never have a convention date. Or having a "convention date" a day before the real election. The "convention" actually being the election. I haven't thought about it much, but I'll figure something out. It may be trial and error.

For the Washington elections, Washington will probably be his own party and the VPs options will be another party.The "nominee" will be Washington's VP.

I could also have everyone run as independent parties and whomever gets second in the election is presumed to be the VP choice. I'd have to somehow split the EVs for each state with Washington off the ballot on one of the EVs, and the VP choices off the ballot on one of the EVs. Again, someone else would have to make the map and code it so it works properly.

The 1796 and 1800 will be difficult, but I'll figure it out. It may well be having the presumptive presidential options on one ticketand the VPs on the other. These elections will probably take me an entire day to figure out what works, but I'll figure something out. From 1804 on will be fine.

Something will work.

I probably won't have faithless electors until Anthony makes that as a possibility. I can try to be creative with the map, but someone else would have to fix the map up and program the possible faithless electors.

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A big what-if for candidates you could use for those elections is what if the Constitutional requirement for President was just "Citizen of the United States," as opposed to "Native-born Citizen of the United States." Then Alexander Hamilton and Albert Gallatin become potential what-if candidates.

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Hamilton was eligible to be president as he was a resident of the colony of New York before the United States became a country, otherwise none of the early presidents would fit the requirement. This answer is the usual response to the Hamilton question. I plan on including Hamilton. To strengthen this argument, Gallatin didn't move to the US until the 1780s and was nominated as Vice President in 1824, but he turned it down because it was a do nothing job.

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I have heard that Goldwater in 1964 defended his candidacy right (he was born a US citizen, but in the Arizona Territory before it became a state) by bringing up the early presidents being born British Subjects in British Colonies, but I had thought the early Constitutional interpretations still demanded being born in a Colony that actually became an American State (of which the Bahamas, where Hamilton was) didn't become such. I suppose I was mistaken on that.

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Well, the actual language should clear it up. I forgot about the "or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution." That would make Hamilton, Gallatin and the numerous British Isle-born politicians eligible for the presidency.

No Person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States, at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution, shall be eligible to the Office of President; neither shall any person be eligible to that Office who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty five Years, and been fourteen Years a Resident within the United States.

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Now, out of curiosity, does this mean, along with Goldwater's precedent, that, if Puerto Rico became a state soon, their residents would be eligible (assuming age and residency, and actual birthplace there) to run for president from that point, as I believe they're already stated as US citizens, just in a polity with no EV's?

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Yes, I think any US Citizen can run for president that is 35 years of age. Therefore, I think a Puerto Rican may be able to run for president now. They are considered citizens as of the 1917 Jones Act.

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