Sunnymentoaddict

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About Sunnymentoaddict

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  • Birthday 09/25/1992

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    South Carolina, USA

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  1. Two questions: 1) I know Melenchon wants a constitution convention, but what are his proposals for said convention? Give parliament more power? 2) You didn't mention Part I Socialist, so I'm curious what they are doing. Are they trying to court FI voters or is the party still unpopular?
  2. With all due respect, it is far too early to assume this new generation will vote Republican. Many factors will come into play that might change this data set: 1) is President Trump a good president. If he isn't, you can expect a good subset of the generation avoid the Republican party. We can think of millennials leaning Democratic due to W. Now if Trump-somehow- became popular by the time he leaves the White House, I'm sure we will an entire generation treat him with the reverence that Reagan once had. But I don't see the latter happening, yet. 2) Party ideology. When I was born in 1992, the GoP nominee- HW Bush- was pushing hard for NAFTA; while Clinton was for it, under certain limitations. Note I'm simplifying this debate. But today, the GoP nominated a protectionist, and he has high approvals within his own party. This ideological shift can explain why the Midwest flipped for him (for many, first time since 1988). But it also explains why middle to upper middle class suburbs began shifting blue. Orange county voted for a Democrat for the first time since FDR. Fort Bend county in Houston Texas voted Democratic. So who is to say that in the next 25 years that two parties will keep the same ideology. I doubt they will.
  3. Let me preface this response by saying I'm not an expert on the Soviet Union, but a bit more knowledgeable on the socialist movements in the US. First, excellent counterpoint. Second, by no means am I trying to say that only opposing a war caused their downfall. If that were the case, isolationist Republicans should've faced a down fall as well, but they did not. But wanted to highlight the difference between the US and western Europe when it came to the difficult question: do we stick to our ideology and risk losing legitimacy, or do we compromise it in hopes of being able to change the government?
  4. Bernie Sanders [too old, I doubt he'd run in 2020] Elizabeth Warren [I can see her running] Joe Biden [too old to seriously run in 2020] Kamala Harris [I see her running. In fact she might get Clinton's support] Kirsten Gillibrand [another possible Clinton candidate] Tim Ryan [he might, but his base "white working class" would be far too small to win] Amy Klobuchar [Maybe, but again at this point too many possible Clinton backers] Cory Booker [I feel he won't if Murphy runs. ] Michelle Obama[ there will be a draft Her movement, but i doubt she will win in a crowded field, filled with much more experienced Candidates] Al Franken [Yeah. He says no, but progessives are saying yes] Deval Patrick [His time at bain will haunt him] Hillary Clinton [She won't. Let alone she shouldn't] Eric Garcetti [I love him, but I doubt the nation is willing to elect a mayor- even if it is LA] Steve Bullock [like him. I think he won't win due to not being left enough on some issues, but will be a solid VP pick] Dwayne Johnson[ he's a republican] John Hickenlooper [he might run, but he won't win the nomination. I doubt Democrats are willing to back a man that hintedf at a unity ticket after 4 years of Trump] Jason Kander [he needs to win an election before running] Chris Murphy [will run if Booker isn't running] Sherrod Brown [He might be the best candidate to win the 2016 Bernie voters.] Roy Cooper [maybe. I'm not sure how he'll do. He's From a state where the GoP isn't cooperating, so he can emphasize "this isn't just Trump" in down ballet races. ] Kasim Reed [He's a mayor of a much smaller city, and declined to run for governor. I doubt he'd run] Bill de Blasio [Mayor, but of the largest city. I can see him possibly running. His universal prek might do well to give him an edge.] Mark Zuckerberg [can we seriously stop trying to make this a thing! ] Mitch Landrieu[ mayor of an even smaller city. And if somehow he won the primary, his removal of Confederate statues will haunt him] Mark Cuban [He's more libertarian than democratic.] Martin O'Malley [He might, but he's been so far removed from politics voters will have to ask themselves, "who?"] Al Gore [ he's old. Plus why would he? ] Jeff Merkley [Another possible Bernie style candidate. I can see him run.] John Kerry [Again old, and I doubt he'd put himself through the stress of running a campaign again] Julian Castro.
  5. Several factors played into the socialist party failure to become a major party, but one that should be highlighted- and often overlooked (maybe from an American perspective)- is their refusial to approve of the US involvement in WW1. Being the only socialist/labor party to condemn the war. France's SFIO, and UKs Labour Party abandoned their antimilitarist views when war broke; and arguably gained legitimacy in the eyes of the voters. But ironically, the US Socialist Party, by sticking to their ideology, allowed them to lose favor in the eyes of the American populis.
  6. Ted Cruz liking incest porn on 9/11 is probably proof we have moved from the attacks. My take away.
  7. Here's an interesting question: would you- in theory- accept the position? Ambassador to a nation that's tied to a current investigation and also is hostile to our Western Allies; and the president has a net disapproval rating. Even if the investigation doesn't lead to an impeachment, you'll still have the stench of being "tied to Russia". Also, I thought Romney was a full time resident of Massachusetts still. Edit: I think McMullen is eying Hatch's seat as well. So it'll be a crowded field if mitt runs.
  8. Free men, free soil, Fremont!
  9. It's weird on that since some of the politicians in this state- like many southern states- were race baiters. Ben Tillman, as I've stated before, played a key role in the founding of Clemson; yet was a devout racist. While that's the most extreme example, he shouldn't be treated like an outlier. Even if I go further back, there's some good, yet race found its way to muddy up their legacy. In my town, there's a park named after the Pinckney family( a prominent political family in the early Republic era). Without Charles Coatsworth lobbying, I'm not sure if South Carolina would have ratified the Constitution. Now, he was very keen trying to get slaves count as a full person in the census; which taints the legacy of a man that fought for the state to join the union. But more recently, mayors like Joe Riley of Charleston led the way of integrating a segregated state by forcing the staff at MUSC(a training hospital) and city hall to no longer have segregated staffs. Apologies for my delay, between prepping for Irma and battling a cold, and work.
  10. As a South Carolinian, here's my two cents on the Governors: Strom: Sure he instituted some reforms to break apart of the political machine that dominated the state; but in the grand scheme of things, his governorship was fairly inconsequential. His tenure will shift South Carolina politics. Haley: She inherited a state that was in a state of distress. Politically, in the aftermath of Mark Sanford's sex scandal. And an economic mess, as the great recession was in full swing- and Sanford refused to accept any federal aid. But her tenure is mixed in my book. Her insistence to create a budget surplus came at the expense of the state's schools, and roads and dams( which the October floods of 2015 showcased their dire need of repairs ). The failing dams can't entirely be blamed on her, yet she did little as possible. Though,shortly after the time she would enter the Trump administration, the chamber of commerce wing of the GoP and Democrats voted on a bipartisan tax bill to repair the state's crumbling roads. When it came to business, one could not say she did little there. Almost appearing as a seasoned diplomat, she successfully brought several manufactures to the state by touting the state's "friendly business climate". So unions and labor rights didn't increase with the rise in manufacturing; but it did ease the pains of the recession. On social issues, she said just enough to keep the state's evangelical community from not being outright angry at her, and enough for the business community to not consider leaving the state. She, unlike North Carolina, did not consider a bathroom bill. But her most famous social issue moment, was the calling to remove the Battle Flag of Northern Virginia (aka the Confederate Flag) from the Statehouse. And we can debate where should the flag be; but in the aftermath of a racially charged shooting ( Dylann Roof), it was a strong of sign that governor will condemn racism in a state that had a history of electing race baitors. McMaster: Not a fan. And very few in the state can say they ate a fan. He's done little to address our state's education crisis. He tried vetoing the said tax bill that was written after Haley left the state, but thankfully it was overridden. And his current handling of the failed Santee Cooper nuclear plant showcases he lacks the administrative skills that Haley possessed. Mind you, I'm someone with Barack Obama as my profile picture, so I might have a bias
  11. I know Cuomo has his eyes on 2020, but is there anyone that can seriously primary him ? Or a centrist Republican (like Pataki) that can defeat him?
  12. Fun fact about Nelson Rockefeller: he once wrote a letter to NBC to keep his favorite show on the air, Star Trek. That alone is why you should vote for him. Also he was a terrific governor by offering affordable housing, and a staunch advocate for equal rights among women and minorities.
  13. My thoughts: 1) I'm for it. Would easily end the hypocrisy of the House GoP during the recent healthcare debate. 2) I'm for. How can we allow immigrants serve in the Senate and House, yet not be commander in chief? 3) I'm against term limits, it'll create a high turnover and constantly introduce legislatures whom lack the knowledge on passing legislation-thus making them prey for large lobbying firms. 4) this won't even pass. What is desecration? Me wearing it as a Pancho- a la Kid Rock in the Superbowl halftime show? Or me simply burning it? Would allowing my flag accidentally touch the ground be considered desecration? There's too many questions that would need to be answered that it wouldn't pass. 5) Line item veto's should exist, yet I doubt Congress would give the president a tool to weaken their influence. 6) Neither Hillary Clinton or Trump won 50% of the vote, that alone should be an argument of a two round system. 7) Yes!! Yes! 8) Yes. Willing to elaborate on how this should work
  14. I am, though Jackson (for better or worse, worse in my book) was a competent leader that actually followed through with many of his populist promises.
  15. You're correct on the origins of the GoP, but I'm trying to see what about Webster lines up with the modern GoP. Then again, if a Republican, I'm sure Webster would find great company with Murkowski in opposing Trump.